Monday May 20, 2019

Permanent solution for pollution in Delhi

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New Delhi: Keeping in mind the rising pollution level in Delhi, Prakash Javadekar on Thursday said in an interview that Delhi’s experiment with odd -even was a “short-term solution” but the union government is taking steps which would result in a permanent solution.

Minister of Environment, Forests and Climate Change Prakash Javadekar said the government would notify new construction and demolition rules.

Also, bypass for trucks has been ordered to be built and Euro VI emission norms would be brought in by 2020.

“Every initiative has its importance, but (odd-even plan) is a short-term solution. The steps we are taking offer a long-term solution to the problem,” Javadekar said in an interview.

A visit for journalists to the Paldev gram panchayat in Madhya Pradesh has been organized by the Ministry of Environment, where Javadekar has adopted six villages for setting up their social infrastructure.

Odd-even formula was introduced by the Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal to control pollution level wherein odd numbered four wheelers were allowed to ply on odd dates and even numbered on even dates.

The formula was on a trial basis for 15 days, beginning on 1st January 2016.

Two-wheelers and CNG vehicles were exempt. Experts said that the impact on pollution was limited during this fortnight though there was a sharp drop in traffic congestion in the capital.

Javadekar argued that construction and demolition waste was one of the major contributors to the pollution levels in the National Capital Region. “For the first time in India, we are ready with construction and demolition rules which will be declared in the next 15 days,” Javadekar said.

With the construction of a bypass for thousands of non-Delhi bound trucks and other vehicles pollution level will reduce permanently, said, minister.

“The project was being discussed for the last 10 years but Modiji got the construction started and it will be ready in the next 18 months,” he said. “This will bring big relief to the citizens who will also have to contribute by maintaining their vehicles, sticking to their lanes, cycling to nearby places and using public transport as much as possible,” Javadekar said.

He also said the government’s target of having Euro VI emission norms by 2020, fours years in advance to the previous UPA government’s target of having it by 2024, was a “huge target” which his government was confident of achieving.

According to the statement, some 150,000 e-rickshaws would ply on the roads of the national capital in the next couple of years as the government had already passed the e-rickshaw bill. “This will change the whole scenario in Delhi.”

The minister was upbeat about the progress in the clean Ganga campaign and said the government was considering a policy whereby the contractors for the effluent treatment plants would be asked to maintain it as well.

Following the CoP21 climate change meeting in Paris last December, the minister said that by June this year discussions on how to achieve emission targets in the next five years in every state and district will be carried out.

“Currently, India’s contribution to the world emissions is only five percent, whereas China, Europe and the US together account for more than 60 percent of the emissions,” he said.

“Our emissions will grow because we are on a growth trajectory but it will grow on a sustainability basis,” he said.

He said his government’s focus was on water saving, energy saving and efficiency measures as well as on increasing forest cover and green initiatives.(IANS)

Next Story

Electric Cars Can Help You Live Longer: Study

The study pointed out that governments have not been keen to support charging infrastructure due to a variety of industry players being involved and their responsibility to carry some of the cost

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Electric cars are gaining more and more popularity in India and are sure to see a boom in their sales and production in the coming future. Photo: M. Rittgerott
Cadillac Unveils a Photo of What You Would Call its First Electric Car. VOA

Migration from polluting vehicles that burn fossil fuels to electric vehicles, ideally using electricity generated sustainably could significantly reduce the incidence of cardiopulmonary illness due to air pollution, says a study.

This could lead not only to less employee absence from work through illness but also lead to broad improvements in the quality and length of life.

The researchers, Mitchell House and David Wright from the University of Ottawa in Canada, analysed the health benefits associated with driving an electric vehicle, and compared them with the cost of expanding the electric vehicle-charging infrastructure between 2016 and 2021.

The study, published in the International Journal of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, found that in the majority of plausible scenarios of balanced growth, when the number of vehicles rises so does the number of charging stations, and there is a positive net benefit to society.

Charging problems with electric car
Tesla cars recharge at a Tesla station at a shopping center in Charlotte, N.C., June 24, 2017. Buyers of Tesla’s luxury models have access to a company-funded Supercharger network. VOA

“Since health benefits accrue to governments, businesses, and individuals, these results justify the use of government incentives for charging station deployment,” the study said.

“The savings that can be achieved by 2021 are higher than the cost of installing charging station infrastructure over a wide range of scenarios,” the researchers added.

Also Read- Deliveroo: Amazon Invests in UK-based Food Delivery Platform

The study pointed out that governments have not been keen to support charging infrastructure due to a variety of industry players being involved and their responsibility to carry some of the cost.

This would include electric utility companies who would profit directly from charging vehicles, out-of-town shopping centres that could attract more customers with charging points in their car parks, the manufacturers of vehicles and a new generation of “gas station” operators. (IANS)