Saturday January 20, 2018

Photographer Moaz Bowman Captures Faces to show human spirit persevering against all odds in War-torn Syria

The photographers took the pictures from different regions of the country, which aims to reach behind the statistics, combat pictures, and global maneuvering to show the real Syria.

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After aerial bombardment by the Syrian government of rebel-held areas of Azaz in Aleppo governorate. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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  • A team of Syrian volunteer photographers part of the “The Humans Of Syria” project, showcased their work at an exhibition at the Capitol hill in the US
  • The photographs are arranged in two circles at the rotunda of the US Senate office building. The photographers also spoke at the opening of the exhibit via video message
  • Republican Senator, Bob Corker, spoke at the opening of the exhibit, saying that it was the greatest humanitarian disasters of modern time and we stood by and let this happen

Sept 09, 2016: His dark eyes glare at the camera as if it caught him doing something forbidden. The nine-year-old boy doesn’t attend school because of the civil war in the country, is shown holding a pen. The caption says he misses school but, “I carry a pen with me wherever I go and write on anything I can.”

The photograph of Moaz from Eastern Ghouta, Syria, is part of an exhibition in the rotunda of a U.S. Senate office building. It captures the human spirit persevering against all odds, despite living in the midst of a five-year-long conflict that has killed about 400,000 people.

A photograph from the Humans of Syria project, on display at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (M. Bowman/VOA)
A photograph from the Humans of Syria project, on display at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (M. Bowman/VOA)

“The Syrian people, if you talk to them, they feel like they’ve been left alone,” says Dr. Lina Murad of the Syrian American Medical Society. Murad left Syria years ago to escape the Assad government. She says the lack of international monetary assistance has meant a complete collapse of humanitarian support.

‘Nation of heroes’

A team of Syrian volunteers took the photos in different regions of the country to show what they call “a nation of heroes who are doing everything they can to live, to love and to dream.”

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGy5L98EwYY

The Humans of Syria project aims to reach behind the statistics, combat pictures, and global maneuvering to show the real Syria. The photographers spoke at the opening of the exhibit via video message.

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Their photographs are arranged in two circles below the high dome of the U.S. Capitol building, in a barren, yet stately space that echoes with footsteps from offices above. The faces look outward from the center of the area as if begging to speak and tell their stories. The captions do it for them.

Four toddlers stand outside ruins in Idlib province. The arched stone cave door leads to their home after their father was killed in the war and their mother left to remarry.

A photograph from the Humans of Syria project, on display at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (M. Bowman/VOA)
A photograph from the Humans of Syria project, on display at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (M. Bowman/VOA)

A 12-year-old from Aleppo attaches lug nuts onto a tire. He started working two years ago after his school was bombed.

“What we don’t understand here is that half the population of Syria is displaced, internally or externally,” said Murad, who is quick to add that government policies, not other humans, are failing her people.

‘Scar on our country’

Senator Bob Corker, a Republican who is the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee spoke at the opening of the exhibit.

“This will go down as one of the greatest humanitarian disasters of modern time and we stood by and let this happen,” he said.

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Corker has long criticized the Obama administration for not putting the U.S. military on the ground in Syria early in the conflict. “This is a scar on our country,” he said.

The groups represented support House Resolution 5732 — The Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act — which promises accountability for Syrian human rights abusers and an analysis of possible no-fly and safe zones. Critics call it a “pro-war bill” that will lead to further U.S. intervention in Syria. The resolution was introduced in the House of Representatives in July.

A photograph from the Humans of Syria project, on display at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (M. Bowman/VOA)
A photograph from the Humans of Syria project, on display at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (M. Bowman/VOA)

In the meantime, a photo stands out. It shows an artist who is wearing a surgical mask to avoid breathing the dust of a bombed building. He has drawn a picture of a little girl in a dress, standing on a pile of skulls.

The little girl is stretching above her head to write the word “Hope.” (VOA)

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U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter

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FILE - The Twitter app is seen on a mobile phone in Philadelphia, April 26, 2017
U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter. VOA

US, Dec 31, 2017: The U.S. Library of Congress says it will no longer collect every single tweet published on Twitter as it has been doing for the past 12 years.

The library said this week that it can no longer collect everything across the entire social media platform because of recent changes Twitter has made, including allowing longer tweets, photos and videos.

It said in a blog post this week that its first objective with collecting and archiving tweets was “to document the emergence of online social media for future generations.” The library says it has fulfilled that objective and no longer needs to be a “comprehensive” collector of tweets.

FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington.
FILE – In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington. VOA

The Library of Congress said it will still collect and archive tweets in the future, but will do so on a more selective basis. It said going forward “the tweets collected and archived will be thematic and event-based, including events such as elections, or themes of ongoing national interest, e.g. public policy.”

The library said it generally does not collect media comprehensively, but said it made an exception for public tweets when the social media platform was first developed.

The library said it will keep its previous archive of tweets from 2006-2017 to help people understand the rise of social media and to offer insight into the public mood during that time. “Throughout its history, the Library has seized opportunities to collect snapshots of unique moments in human history and preserve them for future generations,” it said.

“The Twitter Archive may prove to be one of this generation’s most significant legacies to future generations. Future generations will learn much about this rich period in our history, the information flows, and social and political forces that help define the current generation,” it said. (VOA)