Tuesday March 26, 2019
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Pinterest Continues to Grow Rapidly With 250 Mn Users Monthly

Pinterest is reportedly looking at a mid-2019 Initial Public Offering (IPO) and expects to reach $1 billion in annual revenue for the first time.

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Pinterest
Pinterest now has 250 mn monthly users. Flickr

Visual search giant Pinterest has revealed that it is being used by 250 million people each month as it quietly continues to grow and other social networks slightly falter.

There are now more than 175 billion Pins to explore on Pinterest
 Logo. Flickr

“At a time when the Internet can feel increasingly negative and politicised, we think it’s remarkable that a quarter of a billion people are choosing to spend their time on Pinterest, a place that helps them feel positive and optimistic about the future,” the company wrote in a blog post late on Monday.

Over half of the users on the platform and 80 per cent of new sign ups are from outside the US.

 

“There are now more than 175 billion Pins to explore on Pinterest — up 75 per cent since early last year. People have been saving all kinds of different ideas here, like products they love (+115 per cent), style ideas (+38 per cent), art (+50 per cent) and DIY projects to try (+35 per cent),” the company added.

Pinterest
There are now more than 175 billion Pins to explore on Pinterest . Flickr

The visual search major has secured more than $1 billion in venture capital funding, most recently raising $150 million at a $12.3 billion valuation, according to Tech Crunch.

Also Read: US to Probe Social Media Giants Like Facebook, Twitter Over Censorship Concern

Pinterest is reportedly looking at a mid-2019 Initial Public Offering (IPO) and expects to reach $1 billion in annual revenue for the first time. (IANS)

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Should Live Broadcast on Social Media Platforms be Banned?

Facebook earlier faced flak for the live streaming of suicides on its platform from different parts of the world, including India

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Facebook earlier faced flak for the live streaming of suicides on its platform from different parts of the world, including India. Pixabay

Would you want your teenager to watch terrorists killing people in the real world or someone committing suicide? No one, in their right mind, would ever want their kids to get exposed to such events, simply for the repercussions that such content can have on young impressionable minds.

But with a smartphone on their hand and Facebook installed in it, chances of them watching such horrific content some day cannot be denied, especially because the social media giant allows all its users to go live.

The 28-year-old Australian who sprayed bullets on innocent people who were praying at mosques in New Zealand on March 15 decided to broadcast his act on Facebook.

Facebook said the video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast, but it was watched about 4,000 times before being removed from the platform. By that time, copies of the 17-minute video were later shared in millions on other social media platforms, including Twitter and YouTube.

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The 28-year-old Australian who sprayed bullets on innocent people who were praying at mosques in New Zealand on March 15 decided to broadcast his act on Facebook. Pixabay

Facebook earlier faced flak for the live streaming of suicides on its platform from different parts of the world, including India. So does that mean that live broadcast on social media platforms should be banned?

“What happened in New Zealand was one-of-a-kind heinous exhibition of brutality and terror. I don’t think the world has become so bad that we should see such things occurring repetitively,” Faisal Kawoosa, Chief Analyst at market research firm techARC, told IANS.

“Live streaming is an essential part of social media platforms and as video becomes the default mode of communication over digital platforms, live streaming empowers users to be real time on these platforms,” he added.

Youngsters also find the facility, which is also available on YouTube and Instagram, useful for broadcasting their travelling adventures and tutorials.

“The ‘live’ feature on social networking platforms could be good for people who want to publicise stuff like their travel, fashion or subject tutorials,” said 25-year-old Rijul Rajpal who works with a film production company.

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The social media giant may face similar questions from lawmakers in other countries in the coming days. Pixabay

Many even find it helpful for connecting with their favourite film stars and music icons. But despite the usefulness of the feature, one cannot deny the potential of misuse of the feature, especially because the social media companies have still not developed a technology that can prevent the broadcast of live shooting.

Facebook said that its Artificial Intelligence (AI) system could not automatically detect the New Zealand shooting video as the system was not properly trained. It promised to improve its technology so that broadcast of such videos can be prevented in the future.

ALSO READ: Trump’s Son-in-Law, Jared Kushner’s Whatsapp Habits Worry Cyber Experts

But policy makers are not impressed. In the US, tech firms have already been asked to brief the Congress on March 27 regarding their response to dissemination of the video of the New Zealand terrorists attack on their platforms.

The social media giant may face similar questions from lawmakers in other countries in the coming days. (IANS)