Friday, May 14, 2021
Home Entertainment Bollywood Interview Plabita Borthakur: Casual Sexism All Around

Plabita Borthakur: Casual Sexism All Around

Plabita Borthakur: There is so much casual sexism all around

Actress Plabita Borthakur feels that there is casual sexism all around, and her upcoming film will make people aware of how language can also objectify women.

Plabita, who shot to fame with her role in “Lipstick Under My Burkha”, plays the free-spirited rebel Fauzia in Kumud Chaudhary’s film “Chote Nawab”, expected to release in India soon.

“It was very rewarding to play Fauzia because she represents so many young women trying to assert their individuality. She lives fiercely, speaks her mind, flirts with danger but her priorities are very clear. She knows what she wants from her life. She has seen the women in her family being oppressed, denied all happiness and she is not willing to settle. This last quality is what bonded me to her. The fact that she is not willing to settle,” said Plabita.

Actress Plabita Borthakur feels that there is casual sexism all around, and her upcoming film will make people aware of how language can also objectify women. Pinterest

“The film on the surface is about a family wedding, but it is also about the challenges women face while dealing with misogyny and patriarchal patterns within their own family. There is so much casual sexism all around, and the film makes us aware of how language also dehumanises and objectifies women. The climax is shattering because it brings out all the dormant ugliness within the family structure but also gives us hope that a positive change is imminent,” she added.

ALSO READ : Gender Testing: Tracing sexism, racism and discrimination in sports

“Chote Nawab” also features Akshay Oberoi, Sadiya Siddiqui, and Rajshri Deshpande. The film had premiered at the Indian Film Festival of Cincinnati last year. (IANS)

STAY CONNECTED

19,511FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,773FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Know About ‘Shirk,’ An Indelible Sin In Islam

By- Khushi Bisht The word 'shirk' comes from the Arabic word 'asharaka,' which means 'to share' or 'to make someone equal.' Shirk, according to Islam,...

A Surge In Cybercrime Due To Remote Work In Covid19

With most people working from home, due to the Coronavirus pandemic, there has been a surge in cybercrime. The year 2021 saw 5,258 data...

The Story Of India’s National Flag

BY- JAYA CHOUDHARY A flag is a significant symbol that represents a country, a culture, or a government. It is a sign of the country's...

Psychological Benefits Of Paddle Boarding

By Kenneth Driscoll How many of us are aware of our mental health? Or have we ever had a conversation with our friends or family...

Feminists In Pakistan Are Fighting Cases Of Blasphemy

By Nafisa Hoodbhoy Pakistani feminists say they are determined to fight blasphemy charges filed in mid-April by militant Islamic groups opposed to their International Women's Day...

A Doctor Shows How To Fight Covid The Alkaline Way

 In the midst of Covid-19, when the world is at a loss over how to tackle the pandemic unleashed by the coronavirus, with millions...

Myanmar’s Beauty Queen Takes Up Arms Against Military Junta

Burmese beauty queen Htar Htet Htet has turned rebel, promising to bring down the brutal military junta in Myanmar or die fighting it. Htet Htet...

The Company Quartet: Two Decades Of Extensive Research And Eloquent Storytelling

From multi-award-winning and bestselling historian William Dalrymple comes a four-book collection chronicling the thrilling rise and fall of the East India Company. We still talk...

Recent Comments