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Places in Arunachal Pradesh renamed by China have links to Spiritual Leader Dalai Lama and Tibet, says Expert

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Dalai Lama
The 14th Dalai Lama, Wikimedia

New Delhi, April 25, 2017: Recently, China has renamed most of the six places in Arunachal Pradesh, but surprisingly, all these places have some significance related to the Dalai Lama or Tibet, a China expert said on Sunday.

This is only an attempt to show China’s severe displeasure to India for allowing the Dalai Lama to visit the Tawang monastery in Arunachal Pradesh and address religious congregations there, said Srikanth Kondapalli, a professor of Chinese studies at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, mentioned PTI report.

Earlier this week, China given has a new name- Wo’gyainling to Guling Gompa, which is located on the outskirts of Tawang. This is the place where the sixth Dalai Lama was born.

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In Upper Subansiri district, Daporijo town was named Mila Ri. The town is located beside the river Subansiri, which is one of the principal rivers of Arunachal Pradesh as well as a major tributary of the Brahmaputra river.

Prof. Kondapalli said this place has been used by people from Tibet to enter into India and was a corridor that has not seen a military presence from either side for many years.

Challenging India’s claim

Renaming of Mechuka as Mainquka was to question India’s claim on the area as it is strategically located with heavy military presence, said Prof Kondapalli. The Indian Air Force maintains an Advanced Landing Ground there, which is located in West Siang district.

Bumla, the place where the Dalai Lama made his first stopover during his April 4-13 visit to Arunachal Pradesh, has also been renamed by the Chinese as Bumola.

According to the PTI report, Prof. Kondapalli said this area was invaded in 1962 by the Chinese troops who were subsequently pushed back by the Indian Army.

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Namaka Chu area has been renamed as Namkapub Ri, also the area has a huge possibility for hydro-electricity, he added. China is renamed the sixth place as Qoidengarbo Ri area but it is not clear which place in Arunachal Pradesh it refers to.

Besides hydro-electricity, these areas also have a huge potential for agriculture and fisheries. In the 1980s, all these places gained prominence, when numerous Chinese strategic scholars started mentioning about them in their writings, saying these places could solve problems related to electricity as well as vegetation in Tibet, he added.

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These lush areas are capable of producing vast quantities of food. The Chinese scholars mentioned these areas as the “apple of the eye” of the Tibet region, but these are generally dry, said Prof. Kondapalli.

He said this was part of a trend started by China of giving names to their claims — specifically the islands in the South China Sea where it has conflicting claims with South-East Asian countries, mentioned PTI.

Prof. Kondapalli proposed that India can hit back at China by renaming Aksai Chin and Mansarovar areas, which are under Chinese occupation but claimed by India.

– prepared by Ananya Banerjee of NewsGram, Twitter: @bannerjee_ananya

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This AI System Can Evade Censorship In India, China and Kazakhstan

Researchers develop an AI tool that evades censorship in India, China and Kazakhstan

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censorship
(AI)-based system automatically learns to evade censorship in India, China and Kazakhstan. Pixabay

Researchers have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based system that automatically learns to evade censorship in India, China and Kazakhstan.

The tool, called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), found dozens of ways to circumvent censorship by exploiting gaps in censors’ logic and finding bugs that the researchers said would have been virtually impossible for humans to find manually.

The researchers are scheduled to introduce Geneva during a peer-reviewed talk at the Association for Computing Machinery’s 26th Conference on Computer and Communications Security in London on Thursday.

“With Geneva, we are, for the first time, at a major advantage in the censorship arms race,” said Dave Levin, an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Maryland in the US and senior author of the paper.

“Geneva represents the first step toward a whole new arms race in which artificial intelligence systems of censors and evaders compete with one another. Ultimately, winning this race means bringing free speech and open communication to millions of users around the world who currently don’t have them,” Levin said.\

censorship, AI
This AI system that evades censorship is called ‘Geneva’. Pixabay

To demonstrate that Geneva worked in the real world against undiscovered censorship strategies, the team ran Geneva on a computer in China with an unmodified Google Chrome browser installed.

By deploying strategies identified by Geneva, the user was able to browse free of keyword censorship.

The researchers also successfully evaded censorship in India, which blocks forbidden URLs, and Kazakhstan, which was eavesdropping on certain social media sites at the time, said a statement from the University of Maryland.

All information on the Internet is broken into data packets by the sender’s computer and reassembled by the receiving computer.

One prevalent form of Internet censorship works by monitoring the data packets sent during an Internet search.

The censor blocks requests that either contain flagged keywords (such as “Tiananmen Square” in China) or prohibited domain names (such as “Wikipedia” in many countries).

When Geneva is running on a computer that is sending out web requests through a censor, it modifies how data is broken up and sent, so that the censor does not recognise forbidden content or is unable to censor the connection.

Known as a genetic algorithm, Geneva is a biologically inspired type of AI that Levin and his team developed to work in the background as a user browses the web from a standard Internet browser.

Like biological systems, Geneva forms sets of instructions from genetic building blocks. But rather than using DNA as building blocks, Geneva uses small pieces of code.

Censorship
By deploying strategies identified by Geneva, the user is able to browse free of keyword censorship. Pixabay

Individually, the bits of code do very little, but when composed into instructions, they can perform sophisticated evasion strategies for breaking up, arranging or sending data packets.

The tool evolves its genetic code through successive attempts (or generations). With each generation, Geneva keeps the instructions that work best at evading censorship and kicks out the rest.

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Geneva mutates and cross breeds its strategies by randomly removing instructions, adding new instructions, or combining successful instructions and testing the strategy again.

Through this evolutionary process, Geneva is able to identify multiple evasion strategies very quickly, said the study. (IANS)