Tuesday February 19, 2019
Home India Police to con...

Police to conduct Lie Detector Tests of 9 JNU Students allegedly having Connection in a Missing Student Case: Delhi High Court

Najeeb Ahmed, 27, a first year M.Sc. student, went missing from his Jawaharlal Nehru University hostel on the night of October 14-15

0
//
Lie Detector Test, Wikimedia

New Delhi, Dec 23, 2016: The Delhi High Court on Thursday directed police to conduct lie detector tests of 9 JNU students allegedly having connection in the case relating to missing student Najeeb Ahmed.

A division bench of Justice G.S. Sistani and Justice Jayant Nath also asked Crime Branch of Delhi Police to also conduct searches at their residence of the ex-students.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

“Conduct the lie detector test of nine persons as soon as possible,” said the bench and posted the matter for January 23, 2017.

After the court was informed that two of the nine persons were ex-students and reside outside campus, the court asked police to keep a watch at their rooms and also search their rooms with two squad of sniffer dogs.

The court was hearing a habeas corpus plea filed by Fatima Nafees, Ahmed’s mother that her son be produced by police and the Delhi government before the court.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues

Ahmed, 27, a first year M.Sc. student, went missing from his Jawaharlal Nehru University hostel on the night of October 14-15, allegedly after a row with members of RSS student wing Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP).

The ABVP has denied any involvement in his disappearance.

Police told the court that Najeeb Ahmed’s roommate Qasim had agreed to undergo lie-detector test and he joined the process on Wednesday. However, he refused to participate on next two days i.e. December 22 and 23 for the test, saying he will consult his lawyer.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

Senior advocate Colin Gonsalves appearing for Ahmed’s mother said that the lie detector test of nine suspected students should be conducted first as there were apprehension that they would not participate in test. He added that Qasim can participate in lie detector test after those nine persons.

Filing the status report, Delhi Police told the court that in the presence of Ahmed’s mother and brother, 560 police officials along with the dog squad had conducted search operations at the JNU campus for two days. (IANS)

Next Story

Delhi High Court Dismisses Plea Seeking Regulation on Netflix, Amazon Prime

The plea had also sought an order to the ministries to direct the online platforms "to remove legally restricted content with immediate effect"

0
India
A gardener works on the lawns of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, India, Aug. 22, 2017. India's Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has presided over a string of verdicts in recent weeks that grant more rights to women, gay couples and religious minorities as he prepares to retire from the bench next month. VOA

The Delhi High Court Friday dismissed a plea seeking framing of guidelines by government to regulate the functioning of online media streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.

A bench of Chief Justice Rajendra Menon and Justice V K Rao rejected the petition after the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting informed it that online platforms are not required to obtain any licence from the ministry.

Central government standing counsel Vikram Jetly said the content on online platforms is not being regulated by the ministry.

The court had earlier made it clear that it was not issuing notice on the petition by NGO Justice for Rights Foundation but was only seeking the government’s response on the plea which also alleged that the online media streaming platforms show “uncertified, sexually explicit and vulgar” content.

In its plea filed through advocate Harpreet S Hora, the NGO had claimed that online media streaming platforms, that also include Hotstar, show content which is “unregulated and uncertified” for public viewing.

Netflix.

The court had asked the Centre’s counsel to seek instructions as to whether the alleged broadcasting on the online platforms is based on any licence or regulatory measures provided by government or any regulatory body.

The plea had claimed that television series like “Sacred Games”, “Game of Thrones” and “Spartacus”, shown on platforms like Netflix, contain “vulgar, profane, sexually explicit, pornographic, morally unethical and virulent” content which often “depict women in objectifying manner”.

Also Read- Accusing Without Formal Complaint is Not Authentic: Kailash Kher on #MeToo

It had sought directions to the ministries of communication, information and broadcasting as well as law and justice to frame guidelines to regulate such platforms and the content they broadcast.

The plea had also sought an order to the ministries to direct the online platforms “to remove legally restricted content with immediate effect”. (IANS)