Saturday February 23, 2019

Pollution, the silent killer in metros; 35 per cent children in India have poor lung capacity

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Children are the future of a nation. They hold its virtue and fortune. However according to  a recent survey, around 35 per cent of India’s school going children below 13 years of age are victims of different types of lung disorders due to air pollution.

A misery of metros

Delhi stands tall at the top rank of a nation-wide survey titled Breathe Blue’15. According to it, 21 per cent of children in the national capital were found to have ‘poor’ lung capacity while another 19% had ‘bad’ capacity. A Lung Health Screening Test (LHST) conducted by different schools in Delhi has corroborated the reports.

The survey included 2,000 school students between the age of 8-14, out of which a huge amount of children were found to be suffering from major lung diseases like Bronchitis.

Experts’ opinion

According to Dr Preetaish Kaul, a representative of HEAL Foundation based in Delhi, such kinds of lung screening tests determine the amount of air lung can hold, how fast lungs can make the inflow and outflow of oxygen and remove carbon dioxide out from the body.

The tests can also find out if there is any lung disease and measures the severity of lung disorder. Poor LHST means compromised lung function and high possibilities of contracting pulmonary diseases.

Another expert said, “While rising air pollution in the country poses a serious health risks for all, it is more worrisome for children as they are yet in their growth years with vital organs of the body physiologically not mature enough to deal with it.”

Citizen responsibility?

A similar research termed CLAIM (Clean Air India Movement), dedicated to Citizens’ Awareness and Attitude Survey suggests that most people think that it is the responsibility of the government to clean the air as they can’t do anything about it.

This survey proved that in cities like Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore and Kolkata only 15, 24, 27 and 9 per cent people admitted that they, as a citizen, are also responsible for current emerging scenarios. It has been found at more than 46 per cent bikers, 63 per cent non-ac car drivers and 96 per cent ac car drivers do not turn off their engines due to laziness or luxury.

The growing number of lung diseases should be highlighted at a national level. Awareness campaigns and programs have be carried by the government to turn down the amount of gasses released in the environment. The future of the nation depends on it.

 

 

 

 

 

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Delhi Government Working Towards Robotic Solutions For Cleaning Sewers, Septic Tanks

Robots to clean sewers, septic tanks in Delhi? Find it out here

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FILE - A visitor shakes hands with a humanoid robot at 2018 China International Robot Show in Shanghai (VOA)

In an attempt to fully eradicate manual scavenging from the Indian capital, the Delhi government is working towards robotic solutions for cleaning sewers and septic tanks.

To achieve this goal, Delhi Cabinet Minister Rajendra Pal Gautam convened a meeting with experts from IIT, Delhi Technological University (DTU), New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC), Delhi Jal Board (DJB) and Delhi Cantonment Board among others to discuss the possibilities and the need of robotic solution to sewer cleaning task, the government said on Thursday.

The idea was inspired from a Robot named Bandicoot, developed by Kerala-based start-up Genrobotics, that has been commissioned by municipal bodies in Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

About 80 manual scavengers have been trained in these states to operate the robots in a bid to offset the loss of livelihood.

Bandicoot, a semi-automatic robot, only requires a human operator to stand on the street near the manhole.

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It is a natural thing for man to become dependent on technology, and also addicted to it. Pixabay

“The machine with its many cameras, a robotic arm with 360 degree mobility, and a handy bucket to collect the waste does the work. The operator is only needed for navigation when the manhole is of non-standard size or there are multiple sewer lines below,” a statement said.

“The Delhi government has already taken up various efforts to stop the inhuman practice of manual scavenging and would soon introduce fully mechanised system to clean the sewage system and septic tanks. Still there is a need for robotic solutions for smaller lanes and by lanes where machines cannot go,” the Minister said.

During the meeting, experts from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) said the robot is not constructed for the condition of Delhi. So they suggested that the DJB approach the company for demonstration and feasibility to use such machine in Delhi.

Also Read- Tech Giant Google Ends Forced Arbitration For Employees Globally

While some experts suggested usage of censors in the manhole to check the status of toxic gases, some others suggested a database control room for various sewer line related data and a Helpline number for the same.

“The DJB has been asked to constitute a committee for implementation of various methods to use robot and other type of technology. The government will ensure funds to DJB for this purpose,” the Minister added. (IANS)