Monday February 19, 2018
Home Uncategorized Pong witnesse...

Pong witnesses migratory birds taking off due to mild winter

0
//
109
Republish
Reprint

Himachal Pradesh: The mild weather observed this winter at Pong, located in the Kangra valley of Himalayas, resulted in many migratory bird species leaving the place, wildlife officials said.

Pong is one of the largest man-made wetlands situated in the foothills of the Himalayas in Northern India.

An estimation of waterfowl, both local and migratory, by the state wildlife wing conducted last week at Pong, found that their number has declined by over 30,000 against last year’s count of over 135,000 birds.

Around 128,000 waterfowl from 119 species were recorded in 2014.

The influx of waterfowl in the Pong wetlands every winter is normally over the 120,000 mark.

Around 105,000 waterfowl of 87 species were spotted during the three-day census conducted from February 2.

The decline in their number was mainly due to milder temperatures in the trans-Himalayas, their native habitat, Assistant Conservator of Forests (Pong wetlands) D.S. Dadwal, who was associated with the census, told reporters.

Ornithologists from the Bombay Natural History Society, the Chandigarh Bird Club, the Himachal Bird Club, the Asian Waterfowl Census, wildlife enthusiasts, bird watchers and volunteers participated in the dawn-to-dusk bird counting exercise.

Waterfowl species are those birds that depend on water bodies for roosting and feeding. Last year, 93 species were spotted by the wildlife wing.

Even the count of the bar-headed geese, regular and prominent winter visitors in the Pong Dam wetlands spread over 307 square km, declined massively this winter.

A staggering 71,800 bar-headed geese were recorded last year, a new mark. This year, their number is around 44,000.

Flying thousands of kilometers from their native habitat in high-altitude lakes in Central Asia to avoid the extreme winter chill, the elegant shaped bar-headed geese, an endangered migratory bird species, regularly descend on India.

The Pong Dam wetlands have been emerging as their preferred wintering ground.

Listed under Schedule IV of the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972, the global population of the bar-headed geese is believed to be around 130,000, wildlife experts say.

Besides the bar-headed goose, other prominent species spotted in Pong in the Kangra Valley, some 250 km from Himachal Pradesh capital Shimla and 190 km from Chandigarh, are the coot, common Pochard, red-crested Pochard, great cormorant, Gadwall, Nnorthern Pintail, river tern and the Spotbill duck.

Other species recorded are the common Shelduck, the greater white fronted goose, the black bellied tern, the Sarus crane, the lesser white-fronted goose, the osprey, the buff bellied pipit and water rail. These species are not common visitors in other wetlands in India.

In Pong, an influx of the bar-headed geese can be spotted in marshy areas along the reservoir like Nagrota Suriyan, Nandpur Batoli, Chatta, Jambal and the Rancer island, say wildlife officials.

Figures from the Met Office show February 5 was the warmest day of the month in Shimla town in the past one decade with the maximum temperature recorded at 21.8 degrees Celsius, 13 degrees higher than the long-term average.

The 307 sq km Pong wetlands are also home to many native birds like the red jungle fowl, large Indian parakeet, Indian cuckoo, bank mynah, wood shrike, yellow-eyed babbler, black ibis, paradise flycatcher, crested lark and the crested bunting.

A total of 423 species of birds, 18 species of snakes, 90 species of butterflies, 24 species of mammals and 27 species of fish have so far been recorded in the Pong Dam wildlife sanctuary. (Vishal Gulati, IANS) (Photo: sbs.com.au)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Himalayan Yogi Swami Sundaranand to open art gallery consisting 8 quintal photographs

Wanderer Baba aka Click Baba Swami Sundaranand is all set to open his art gallery

0
//
32
Himalayan Yogi
Himalayan Yogi Swami Sundaranand (Wikimedia Commons)
  • Himalayan Yogi Swami Sundaranand is also known as “Himalayan Wikipedia Baba”, have clicked 8 quintal photos in beautiful Himalayas

You must have heard about many Himalayan yogi living upto hundreds of years and having miracle powers. But this is the story of a wanderer Sadhu, who is a mountaineer and photographer by choice. He has a deep connection with Himalayas. Swami Sundaranand is known to be a principal advocate for the ecological preservation of the Himalayas, the Ganges and its source at Gangotri.

During 1962 war Indian Army also sought help from this Himalayan Yogi as he was very much aware with all the routes and region in Himalayas.

Swami Sundaranand’s love for Himalayas started at a young age when he read a book named “Himgiri Vihaar” by Tapovan Maharaja. He was so inspired by the book that he went to Tapovan Maharaja and started Yoga Sadhna under his guidance.

Swami Sundaranand
Tapovan Kutir, where Swami Sundaranand lives in the summer (Facebook)

In 1956 he bought a camera for Rs. 25 from a Belgian tourist. And since then he has been clicking pictures of the beautiful Himalayas. He has taken more than 100,000 photos, over a 50-year period, of the shrinking Gangotri glacier in the Indian Himalayas. The photographs he clicked weighs around 8 quintals.

  • The most awaited Art Gallery by Himalayan Yogi Swami Sundaranand will open in Gangotri region

Himalayan Yogi Swami Sundaranand is now all set to open his Himalayan art gallery at a height of 10,310 feet in Gangotri region. The construction has already begun. He has invested Rs. 2 crores in this project, money which he got through royalty of his book “Himalaya : Through a lens of a Sadhu”. His book was launched by then Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee. Swami Sundaranand is the subject of a feature documentary shot at his home in Gangotri titled “Personal time with Swamiji”. The film was produced by The Centre for Healing Arts and directed by Victor Demko.

Himalayan Yogi
Swami Sundaranand’s Art Gallery under construction in Gangotri Region (Facebook)

Himalayan Yogi Swami Sundaranand is also a skilled naturalist who is familiar with thousands of Himalayan plants and he knows the lore and medicinal uses of these species. The most important parts of his life are meditation, japa and pranayama. As a younger man he was an accomplished hatha yogi, mastering 300 postures, and he continues to practice it daily. He is very devoted to the ecosystem in which he has lived for forty years and believes that “God does not reside in temples or mosques – he is scattered everywhere in the courtyard of nature.

So Himalayan Yogi’s art gallery you can not miss to visit! Plan your trip soon and thank us later.

– by Shaurya Ritwik, Shaurya is Sub-Editor at NewsGram and writes on Geo-politcs, Culture, Indology and Business. Twitter Handle – @shauryaritwik