Thursday September 20, 2018

Poor mental health to cost Indian economy dearly: Report

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New Delhi: With one in every five person in India suffering from some form of mental disorder, mental health-related cost would account for 20 percent of economic loss from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) between 2012 and 2030, says a new report.

The “Aarogya Bharat” report by the Healthcare Federation of India (NATHEALTH) and leading management consulting firm Bain & Company estimated an economic loss of $6.2 trillion due to NCDs between 2012 and 2030.

“Among non-communicable diseases, mental health is the largest contributor to economic loss in India. It is estimated that mental health will accord 20 percent of economic loss from NCDs 2012-2030, which is estimated at $6.2 trillion,” said Anjan Bose, secretary general, NATHEALTH, a forum of healthcare providers in India.

Mental health illness rate is very high among Indians from ages of 20 to 40, the report said.

“Mental health illness’s indirect costs are higher than direct costs,” said Samir Parikh, director, mental health & behavioural sciences, Fortis Hospital, New Delhi.

Parikh said that direct cost in mental health care includes costs of care like medication, clinic visits (fees), hospitalisation, diagnostic services, residential care, community services, rehabilitation and non-medical costs like transportation for treatment and care, etc.

“These are the value of resources used in the treatment of disease. Indirect costs are value of resources lost as a result of illness,” Parikh added.

Indirect costs due to mental health include costs related to reduced supply of labour (unemployment), reduced educational attainment, expenses for social supports, costs associated with consequences like chronic disability, homelessness, crime, suicide, homicide, caregiver burden, value of family caregiver’s time, medical complications of mental illnesses, early mortality, substance use and other unquantifiable costs like emotional burden on family etc.

“Other costs include those for health awareness campaigning,” Parikh said.

Mental health also affects economy through early retirements, negative expectations regarding employment and reduced productivity. On the whole, it leads to increase in expenditure for health system, individuals and households, the report noted.

So far as mental health in India is concerned, there is an urgent need to shift from curative approach to a preventive one, Parikh pointed out.

-IANS

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Mental Health Issues Are Not Likely to Ruin Teenagers’ Friendships, Says Study

Compared to boys, girls tend to favour extended dyadic exchanges, and so they may respond to submissive behaviour with support and empathy, which may strengthen friendship ties

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Teenagers
Mental health may not ruin teenagers' friendships: Study. Pixabay

Teenagers with similar levels of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression are more likely to remain friends, but dissimilarites can create incidence instability, a new study has found.

“An important takeaway from our study is that children’s personal struggles need not adversely impact their social relationships,” said Brett Laursen, Professor at the Florida Atlantic University (FAU).

“Mental health issues do not necessarily ruin chances of making and maintaining worthwhile friendships,” he added.

Youth who resembled one another were more likely to remain friends from one year to the next.

“Behavioural similarity is tremendously important to a friendship. Shared feelings and shared experiences are the glue that holds a friendship together,” Laursen said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence, the team included 397 adolescents (194 boys, 203 girls) in 499 same-sex friendships, who were followed from grade seven (median age 13), through to the end of high school in grade 12.

Teenagers
Youth who resembled one another were more likely to remain friends from one year to the next. Pixabay

They examined the degree to which internalising symptoms — anxiety, depression, social withdrawal and submissiveness — predicted the dissolution of teenage friendships.

In most respects, boys and girls did not differ in the factors that predicted friendship instability.

However, one notable exception was — differences on submissiveness increased friendship instability for boys, but decreased friendship instability for girls.

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“Compared with girls, boys are more competitive and confrontational in interactions with friends, suggesting that dissimilarity on submissiveness may be a liability when it comes to the activities that many boys prefer such as sports and games,” Laursen said.

“Compared to boys, girls tend to favour extended dyadic exchanges, and so they may respond to submissive behaviour with support and empathy, which may strengthen friendship ties,” he noted. (IANS)