Tuesday July 16, 2019

Poor Nutrition Is A Key Driver and Risk Factor For Disease

enable the world to follow the diet, the report suggests five strategies, one of which is subsidies.

0
//
Diet
Eat more fruit and vegetables to lower blood pressure. Pixabay

The EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet, Health brings together more than 30 world-leading scientists from across the globe to reach a scientific consensus. In addition to focusing on what consumers consume, the planetary health diet focuses on the role of farming plays and the impact it has on wildlife and pollution. It also addresses a widening paradox of this world: that 1 billion people across the world live in hunger, while another 2 billion people are obese. If successfully implemented, the authors estimate 10.9 to 11.6 million deaths could be avoided every year. To enable the world to follow the diet, the report suggests five strategies, one of which is subsidies.

beef
enable the world to follow the diet wit less Beef

The report also states that incentivizing farmers to shift food production away from large quantities of a few crops to a more diverse production of nutritious crops could be beneficial. The commission says that an effort to reduce food waste can be made by improving harvest planning in low and middle income countries. It also suggests that the shopping habits of consumers in high-income countries need to be improved, too. An increase in consumption of healthy foods (such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, and nuts), and a decrease in consumption of unhealthy foods (such as red meat, sugar, and refined grains) that would provide major health benefits, and also increase the likelihood of attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Also Read:All Religions Flourished In India: Modi

According to the lancent web site, Poor nutrition is a key driver and risk factor for disease. However, there has been a global failure to address this. It is everyone’s and no-one’s problem. Despite several efforts, actions for improving nutrition have failed to gain global traction. The triple challenges of obesity, under nutrition, and climate change, which interact and affect human and planetary health, need solutions that disrupt their common underlying societal and political drivers. Sustainable food systems that ensure health-promoting nutrition for all need urgent attention and will benefit people and planet alike.

(Hindu Council Of Australia)

Next Story

Consuming High- Fibre Diet may Reduce Risk of Preeclampsia During Pregnancy

Pregnancy outcomes and infant immunity are linked to gut bacteria

0
The mother's gut bacteria and diet appear to be crucial to promoting healthy pregnancy. Pixabay

Ladies, please take note. Consuming a high-fibre diet may reduce the risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy, researchers have found.

“Simple recommendation to ‘eat real food, mostly plants and not too much’ might be the most effective primary prevention strategy for some of the most serious conditions of our time.

“The mother’s gut bacteria and diet appear to be crucial to promoting healthy pregnancy,” said study lead author Ralph Nanan, Professor at the University of Sydney.

The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, showed that pregnancy outcomes and infant immunity are linked to gut bacteria.

Fibre, Diet, Pregnancy
Ladies, please take note. Pixabay

Plant-based fibre is broken down in the gut by bacteria into factors that influence the immune system. The research team investigated the role of these metabolic products of gut bacteria during pregnancy.

The researchers found that in humans, reduced levels of acetate, which is mainly produced by fibre fermentation in the gut, is associated with the common and serious pregnancy-related condition preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia occurs in up to 10 per cent of pregnancies and is characterized by high blood pressure, protein in the urine and severe swelling in the mother’s body.

It also interferes with the child’s immune development whilst in the womb, with some evidence suggesting a link to higher rates of allergies and autoimmune diseases later in life.

Also Read- Railway Cracking Down on Sale of Unauthorized Brands of Drinking Water at All Major Railway Stations

The study found that preeclampsia affected the development of an important foetal immune organ – the thymus – which sits just behind the breastbone.

Foetuses in preeclamptic pregnancies were found to have a much smaller thymus than children from healthy pregnancies.

The cells the thymus normally generates — called ‘T’ cells, and specifically those associated with the prevention of allergies and autoimmune conditions such as diabetes — also remained lower in infants after preeclampsia, even four years after delivery.

Fiber, Diet, Pregnancy
Consuming a high-fibre diet may reduce the risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy, researchers have found. Pixabay

The mechanisms of acetate on the developing foetal immune system were further examined in separate experiments involving mice that showed acetate was central in driving foetal thymus and ‘T’ cell development.

Also Read- WhatsApp Messages Can be Traced Without Diluting end-to-end Encryption

The results showed that promoting specific metabolic products of gut bacteria during pregnancy might be an effective way to maintain a healthy pregnancy and to prevent allergies and autoimmune conditions later in life. (IANS)