Saturday January 25, 2020

Poor Nutrition Is A Key Driver and Risk Factor For Disease

enable the world to follow the diet, the report suggests five strategies, one of which is subsidies.

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Diet
Eat more fruit and vegetables to lower blood pressure. Pixabay

The EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet, Health brings together more than 30 world-leading scientists from across the globe to reach a scientific consensus. In addition to focusing on what consumers consume, the planetary health diet focuses on the role of farming plays and the impact it has on wildlife and pollution. It also addresses a widening paradox of this world: that 1 billion people across the world live in hunger, while another 2 billion people are obese. If successfully implemented, the authors estimate 10.9 to 11.6 million deaths could be avoided every year. To enable the world to follow the diet, the report suggests five strategies, one of which is subsidies.

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enable the world to follow the diet wit less Beef

The report also states that incentivizing farmers to shift food production away from large quantities of a few crops to a more diverse production of nutritious crops could be beneficial. The commission says that an effort to reduce food waste can be made by improving harvest planning in low and middle income countries. It also suggests that the shopping habits of consumers in high-income countries need to be improved, too. An increase in consumption of healthy foods (such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, and nuts), and a decrease in consumption of unhealthy foods (such as red meat, sugar, and refined grains) that would provide major health benefits, and also increase the likelihood of attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Also Read:All Religions Flourished In India: Modi

According to the lancent web site, Poor nutrition is a key driver and risk factor for disease. However, there has been a global failure to address this. It is everyone’s and no-one’s problem. Despite several efforts, actions for improving nutrition have failed to gain global traction. The triple challenges of obesity, under nutrition, and climate change, which interact and affect human and planetary health, need solutions that disrupt their common underlying societal and political drivers. Sustainable food systems that ensure health-promoting nutrition for all need urgent attention and will benefit people and planet alike.

(Hindu Council Of Australia)

Next Story

High-Protein Diets May Increase Heart Attack Risk: Study

High-protein diets clog arteries, up heart disease risk

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Heart Attack
High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but there is a downside to it a" a greater heart attack risk. Pixabay

High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but there is a downside to it a” a greater heart attack risk, says a health news and study. Researchers now report that high-protein diets boost artery-clogging plaque.

The research in mice showed that high-protein diets spur unstable plaque — the kind most prone to rupturing and causing blocked arteries.

More plaque buildup in the arteries, particularly if it’s unstable, increases the risk of heart attack.

“There are clear weight-loss benefits to high-protein diets, which has boosted their popularity in recent years,” said senior author Babak Razani, associate professor at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.

Heart Attack
More plaque buildup in the arteries, particularly if it’s unstable, increases the risk of heart attack. Pixabay

“But animal studies and some large epidemiological studies in people have linked high dietary protein to cardiovascular problems. We decided to take a look at whether there is truly a causal link between high dietary protein and poorer cardiovascular health,” Razani added.

The researchers studied mice who were fed a high-fat diet to deliberately induce atherosclerosis, or plaque buildup in the arteries.

Some of the mice received a high-fat diet that was also high in protein. And others were fed a high-fat, low-protein diet for comparison.

The mice on the high-fat, high-protein diet developed worse atherosclerosis — about 30 per cent more plaque in the arteries — than mice on the high-fat, normal-protein diet, despite the fact that the mice eating more protein did not gain weight, unlike the mice on the high-fat, normal-protein diet.

“A couple of a scoop of protein powder in a milkshake or smoothie adds something like 40 grams of protein — almost equivalent to the daily recommended intake,” Razani said.

“To see if protein has an effect on cardiovascular health, we tripled the amount of protein that the mice receive in the high-fat, high-protein diet — keeping the fat constant. Protein went from 15 per cent to 46 per cent of calories for these mice”.

Heart attack
High-Protein Intake may affect your cardiovascular health. Pixabay

Plaque contains a mix of fat, cholesterol, calcium deposits and dead cells. Past work by Razani’s team and other groups has shown that immune cells called macrophages work to clean up plaque in the arteries.

But the environment inside plaque can overwhelm these cells, and when such cells die, they make the problem worse, contributing to plaque buildup and increasing plaque complexity.

“In mice on the high-protein diet, their plaques were a macrophage graveyard,” Razani informed.

To understand how high dietary protein might increase plaque complexity, Razani and his colleagues also studied the path protein takes after it has been digested — broken down into its original building blocks, called amino acids.

Also Read- Lower Physical Activity in Adulthood Leads to Obesity: Study

“This study is not the first to show a telltale increase in plaque with high-protein diets, but it offers a deeper understanding of the impact of high protein with the detailed analysis of the plaques,” said Razani.

“This work not only defines the critical processes underlying the cardiovascular risks of dietary protein but also lays the groundwork for targeting these pathways in treating heart disease,” he added. (IANS)