Monday September 24, 2018
Home India ‘Pregnant’ Wo...

‘Pregnant’ Woman caught with drug pouches in her body

0
//
193
credit: www.newsx.com
Republish
Reprint

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

A South African woman has been found with 40 small pouches of narcotic drugs inside her body at the Hyderabad airport.

The lady was posing as being pregnant when she was held by Narcotics Control Board (NCB) officials on Sunday. The 32 year old women named Mosiea Moosa was aboard on an Emirates flight from Dubai.

credit: www.indiatoday.intoday.in
credit: www.indiatoday.intoday.in

The doctors at the government-run Osmania General Hospital, who had recovered 16 packets till late Sunday night, extracted 24 more packets on Monday. The pouches recovered so far are estimated to contain 450 grams of narcotic drug, suspected to be cocaine. This is estimated to be valued at Rs. 1 crore in the international market.

The woman had difficulty in walking and when questioned by NCB sleuths, she claimed to be seven months pregnant. However, the officials felt suspicious by her travel pattern over the last few days. The South African national was first taken to a corporate hospital near the airport, where she admitted that packets of narcotics were concealed in her body. She was later shifted to Osmania Hospital and kept under medical supervision. A series of tests were conducted by doctors. The hospital authorities clarified that no surgery was conducted.

Moosa, who had concealed the narcotic substance in her belly and uro-genital tract, was given laxatives to naturally extract the pouches. A hospital official said more tests were being conducted to know if there are more sachets of drugs in her body.

Investigations by the NCB revealed that Mosiea flew to Dubai from Johannesburg on August 23. The next day, she landed in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. She returned to Dubai on August 28 and from there took a flight to Hyderabad.

The officials suspect that the woman procured the contraband from Brazil and managed to smuggle it into Dubai. The NCB sleuths were questioning the woman to identify the person or people to whom she was to deliver the drugs.

With inputs from IANS

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Cocaine Abuse Can be Controlled With Elevated Bile Acid Levels

The findings also contributed to a greater understanding of how gut-based signalling influenced higher order central functions such as reward

0
cocaine
The results provided evidence to show that elevated levels of bile after the surgery reduced the preference for cocaine. Pixabay

Bile acids that aid in fat digestion may reduce the rewarding properties of cocaine use, suggesting potential new strategies for treatment of drug abuse, a study has found.

The findings showed that bile diversion surgery — an experimental treatment for weight loss by increasing the amount of bile acids that enter the general circulation — lowered dopamine release in response to cocaine.

Further, mice that received the surgery also had lower craving for cocaine.

“These findings redefine the physiological significance of bile acid signalling and highlighting the importance of determining whether bile acid analogues represent a viable pharmacological treatment for cocaine abuse,” said Aurelio Galli from the University of Alabama in the US.

cocaine
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal PLOS Biology, the team administered a drug called OCA — semi-synthetic bile acid — in mice that mimicked the effect of bile at its brain receptor named TGR5.

The results provided evidence to show that elevated levels of bile after the surgery reduced the preference for cocaine.

Also Read: How drugs like heroin, opium, cocaine, marijuana make way into India

Knocking out TGR5 from the brain’s nucleus accumbens — a central reward region — prevented bile acids from reducing cocaine’s effects, confirming that signalling through this receptor was responsible for the cocaine-related results of bile acid elevation.

The findings also contributed to a greater understanding of how gut-based signalling influenced higher order central functions such as reward. (IANS)

Next Story