Sunday November 17, 2019

Prepare Yourself For Winters With These Herbs

Here are 6 herbs that will help you stay warm during winters

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Herbs
Keep yourself warm during winters with these herbs. Pixabay

Preety Tyagi, Lead Health Coach and founder of MY22BMI, underlines some properties of herbs found in household that may help you stay healthy during the season.

1. Tulsi
Tulsi is known to help relieve the symptoms of allergies, breathing problems and bronchitis. A couple of leaves can be consumed straightaway or in tea. Herbal supplements of the plant are also available.

2. Ginger
Ginger is also considered as a herb. A recent study showed that oral ginger supplements improve asthma symptoms. It can also be taken as detox drink by using it in tea. It relieves throat infection. Ginger mixed with honey and black pepper is an excellent reliever of breathing related allergies and helps in clearing the nasal passage.

3. Butterbur
Butter bur is a remedy for migraine. Studies have showed that it can improve unpleasant allergy symptoms while avoiding the sedative effects of antihistamines. However, this herb has some side effects as well. Over consumption is not recommended at any case.

4. Stinging Nettle Leaf/ Bichhoo Buti
Stinging nettle is a perennial flowering plant that has been used medicinally for ages. Regarding seasonal allergies, stinging nettle has been shown to have excellent anti-inflammatory abilities. This is important because it is those inflammatory events that cause seasonal allergy symptoms.

Herbs
Basil, one of the most famous herbs is proven to relieve you from allergies, breathing problems and bronchitis. Pixabay

5 . Rosemary
Fresh and dried rosemary is popular as an addition to many culinary creations. Researches have proved rosemary’s ability to help fight allergy symptoms and provide relief to asthma sufferers.

The herb contains rosmarinic acid which has both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. It is a free radical scavenger that can suppress the inflammatory responses of certain white blood cells, as well as allergic antibodies. Rosmarinic acid should help improve seasonal allergy symptoms. Just one word of caution: If you’re taking rosmarinic acid as a supplement, take it with food to prevent a potential mild stomach ache.

6. Oregano
Oregano is a well known Italian herb. It is also available in form of supplements for certain health benefits. Those supplements include Oregano oil extract in form of pills and as a soft gel capsule. They contain other ingredients to dilute oregano oil, since it’s very potent. The capsules can be taken orally, or cut open and applied to the skin, provided they’re not full strength.

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Oregano oil is also available as a highly concentrated essential oil that comes in liquid form. The oil may come premixed with a carrier oil or it may be purchased full strength. If it’s not premixed, you’ll have to dilute it yourself by combining it with a carrier oil, such as coconut or olive oil. The usual recipe is 5 to 6 drops for every ounce of carrier oil. (IANS)

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Begin Intermittent Fasting For A Healthy Life

Scientists says that intermittent fasting leads to a longer and healthier life

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People who practice intermittent fasting live longer. Pixabay

Intermittent fasting may sound like another diet fad but researcher have conclusively found that the practice of routinely not eating and drinking for short periods of time resulted in longer life in heart patients.

In the study by Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, researchers found that heart patients who practiced regular intermittent fasting lived longer than patients who don’t.

In addition, they found that patients who practice intermittent fasting are less likely to be diagnosed with heart failure.

“It’s another example of how we’re finding that regularly fasting can lead to better health outcomes and longer lives,” said Benjamin Horne, principal investigator of the study.

While the study does not show that fasting is the causal effect for better survival, these real-world outcomes in a large population do suggest that fasting may be having an effect and urge continued study of the behaviour.

In the study, researchers asked 2,001 Intermountain patients undergoing cardiac catheterization from 2013 to 2015 a series of lifestyle questions, including whether or not they practiced routine intermittent fasting.

Researchers then followed up with those patients 4.5 years later and found that routine fasters had greater survival rate than those who did not.

Fasting affects a person’s levels of hemoglobin, red blood cell count, human growth hormone, and lowers sodium and bicarbonate levels, while also activating ketosis and autophagy – all factors that lead to better heart health and specifically reduce risk of heart failure and coronary heart disease.

Intermittent fasting by heart patients
Heart patients should definitely practice intermittent fasting. Pixabay

“This study suggests that routine fasting at a low frequency over two thirds of the lifespan is activating the same biological mechanisms that fasting diets are proposed to rapidly activate,” said Dr Horne.

Researchers speculate that fasting routinely over a period of years and even decades conditions the body to activate the beneficial mechanisms of fasting after a shorter length of time than usual.

Typically, it takes about 12 hours of fasting for the effects to be activated, but long-term routine fasting may cause that time to be shortened so that each routine faster’s daily evening/overnight fasting period between dinner and breakfast produces a small amount of daily benefit, they noted.

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Fasting is not for everyone. Researchers cautioned that pregnant and lactating women should not fast, as well as young children and frail older adults.

People diagnosed with chronic diseases – especially those who take medications for diabetes, blood pressure, or heart disease – should not fast unless under the close care and supervision of a physician. (IANS)