Monday December 11, 2017
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Prostitution: A dark world of ‘missing’ betis

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Sonagachi

By Divya Chaubey

Human life is a struggle. A struggle that starts with finding air to breathe and continues with the daily search for feeding the tummy. The day we die, it ends. People do various things to survive. People work for others; work under circumstances that they might not want to; sell their kids; sell their body and dignity with it.

Prostitution is one such job. It is never a choice made consciously. People are either forced in to it after being trafficked from one part of the world to another, or they are just born in to it with nowhere else to go.

The sad truth is, no one wants to be a prostitute, it is illegal in India, yet we have the so called ‘red light area’ in every district.

The society is not honest enough to accept this truth. With a stigma attached to it, it is not acceptable in our society, yet a big part of the population is involved in it. Girls with the tag of prostitutes are refused and disrespected in the society. The irony of it lies in the fact that at one place this society disrespects prostitutes and at the next wants their services for self-gratification. They are termed as impure and characterless but this society is the manager of this sad truth.

Men not only fulfill their sexual desires by visiting prostitutes but they also bring their anger, frustration, mental illness with them to wreak havoc on a prostitute. This is just a picture of what is done to them, every night.

There are so many stories of women who share their plight of being trapped in this dark world. Brenda Myers Powell is one of them, she revealed her story of being a prostitute for 25 years with a website. Similarly, Bharti Tapas, says that when she was 14, she was sold into slavery, beaten and forced into prostitution. The girl was quoted as saying to ABC news.

“When I arrived at the brothel, I refused to do what they told me to and they beat me and starved me for 10 days,” says the soft-spoken girl. “I thought I would rather kill myself than be forced to work as a prostitute.”

She was just a schoolgirl when she found herself in Mumbai, along with thousands of other girls who were beaten, locked in tiny cages or hidden in attics. Some were forced to have sex with 20 men a day under the watchful eyes of madams and pimps.

No girl wants to be a prostitute and never dreams of becoming one. Respect, career, marriage, children and family -this is what every normal girl wants in her life. But when no one wants this to happen, why do we have such a big prostitution web? How does this web function when no one wants to become a prostitute or is ready to give them social acceptance?

Every day we come across several news headlines of missing young girls but hardly bother or think about it. The word ‘missing’ attached to their names remains with them for whole life, which is not only a prefix to their denominations but also to their ‘missing life’. After being named as ‘missing’, these girls get the tag of ‘prostitute’ as their lives continue in the dark world.

The question is if this society needs prostitution so desperately then why the disrespect and rejection of prostitutes in the society.

You need them, you make them, you push them in this dark world, you ill-treat them and finally you make money out of them.

This must end. It is a sad truth that needs to be told. The society must make strides to accept them if it can not stop creating them forcefully. Proper laws (and execution) on human trafficking, child abuse, prostitution, rehabilitation or their kids should be make and effected.

It will take time but even in selling their dignity, they are honest about it. When will the society and state act honest and integrate them and their kids in ‘normal’ societies?

  • K.K

    Good article.Today very few people talk about this problem.I think no one is talking about this other than few NGOs.Today in every small and big cities of India there are so called Red light area.How painful it is for a girl or women to earn by selling her body.pta nahi kis majburi me ussey ek jaanwar ki Hawas ki aag bujhani Patti hai par hamara Sabhya samaj ussey Vesya kahta hai par USS aadmi ko rakhshas nahi.”Nagarbadhuwen Akbar nahi padhti” a book written by Anil yadav shows how our society and system tortures them.

    • K.K

      That book is “नगर वधूएं अख़बार नही पढती” a Banaras based book.
      The problem of prostution will never be cure.It will always remain in our society.According to child and women development ministry of India there are 3 milion sex worker.35% are below 18 .Some are forced to do it but a large proportion has taken it as an proffetion because they don’t have any other work to do.3 milion are workers but a huge no of customer(abuser) are involve in it.
      It is coming during ancient time.As like poverty it will never end.
      महज कुछ मज़बुरियां रही होंगी बेशर्मी की…
      सरे बाज़ार कोइ इज्ज़त निलाम नहीं करता |

  • K.K

    Good article.Today very few people talk about this problem.I think no one is talking about this other than few NGOs.Today in every small and big cities of India there are so called Red light area.How painful it is for a girl or women to earn by selling her body.pta nahi kis majburi me ussey ek jaanwar ki Hawas ki aag bujhani Patti hai par hamara Sabhya samaj ussey Vesya kahta hai par USS aadmi ko rakhshas nahi.”Nagarbadhuwen Akbar nahi padhti” a book written by Anil yadav shows how our society and system tortures them.

    • K.K

      That book is “नगर वधूएं अख़बार नही पढती” a Banaras based book.
      The problem of prostution will never be cure.It will always remain in our society.According to child and women development ministry of India there are 3 milion sex worker.35% are below 18 .Some are forced to do it but a large proportion has taken it as an proffetion because they don’t have any other work to do.3 milion are workers but a huge no of customer(abuser) are involve in it.
      It is coming during ancient time.As like poverty it will never end.
      महज कुछ मज़बुरियां रही होंगी बेशर्मी की…
      सरे बाज़ार कोइ इज्ज़त निलाम नहीं करता |

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Bride Sale in India: Buy A Wife Policy

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Human Trafficking
Bride Slavery in India: Abhishek Suresh

Bride Sale: Story of transformation of Indian Bride into Slave Bride

Samridhi Nain

Bride Sale in India seems to be trending in Haryana, a state with the lowest sex ratio, even marriage continues to be a way of exploitation as Indian brides for marriage are purchased at cattle rate and trafficked into the states of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, and Punjab.
These ‘brides’ are imported from poverty-stricken states like Jharkhand, Bihar, Orrisa, West Bengal & Assam, where the traffickers either take advantage of the family’s poverty or abduct the young girls varying anywhere between the ages of 15 and 30, according to 2013 National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).
The bride sale practice has been completely normal in the northern states due to the acute shortage of girls because of practices like sex selection and female foeticide. But if the reports are to be believed then even if not a single case of female foeticide takes place in Haryana, it would still take 50 years to get the numbers back to normal from India’s sex ratio today. However, the problem remains as locals & Khap leaders keep refusing to accept the facts at hand. Some believe it is the education of women that is the root problem because they want to marry a man who is also well-educated, whereas some believe that there has always been a shortage of girls but before where one woman would take care of five brothers, now, it requires five separate women to do the same.
As Haryana keeps preferring the male child and that male child grows up to prefer a bride, the best solution available at hand remains of these women who are bought at a price varying on their age, beauty & virginity and once bought, they are turned into a slave bride. Once married, these women can be resold as they are not viewed as a respected member but a commodity as they are not considered to be entitled to any inheritance by the family.
Human Trafficking to Bride Sale
Stencil of Missing Girls Project, Wikimedia Commons
A field study, covering 92 villages of Mahendragarh, Sirsa, Karnal, Sonipat & Mewat districts had been conducted on the impact of the sex ratio on marriage which covered over 10,000 households and found that 9,000 married women were bought from other states. The study was conducted by NGO Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra but the families kept denying of any exchange of money for the bride.
In 2016, the ministry of women and child development came up with India’s first comprehensive anti-trafficking laws under ‘Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection & Rehabilitation) Bill, 2016 but the bill faces many challenges and is believed to not achieve its objectives of preventing trafficking & providing protection & rehabilitation to trafficked victims. Activists also believe that the bill will be able to do very little to stop the bride sale.
With such haunting demographics at hand, the hope still remains that sooner or later, the government might realize the need for stringent implementation of the rules & regulations to stop the violation of these young women at the hands of sex traffickers and quell this ‘Buy A Bride’ policy.
-Samridhi is a student of Philosophy Hons. at the University of Delhi.

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Sexual abuse is everywhere in the world, says Radhika

The actress believes that one should know how to say 'No'

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Radhika Apte's view on sexual abuse
Bollywood actress Radhika Apte says that sexual abuse is not only in B-town but in every part of the society. Wikimedia Commons

– Durga Chakravarty

Actress Radhika Apte feels that sexual abuse does not only exist in the world of showbiz but takes place in every alternate household.

“Sexual abuse takes place in every alternate household. So it’s not a part of just the film industry. You have so much child abuse, domestic abuse everywhere in the world, including India,” Radhika told IANS over phone from Mumbai.

She says it exists in “every field and household at some level or the other and that it all needs to be eliminated”.

Sexual abuse does not target just women, stresses Radhika.

“It’s also towards men, little boys and everybody. People exploit their power at every level.”

Radhika asserted that this needed to change.

“I think it starts from us putting our foot down and saying ‘no’ to things, however big your ambition is. You need to be brave about it, believe in your own talent, say ‘no’ and start speaking up because if one person speaks up, nobody is going to listen to him or her. But if 10 people do, then others would (listen to them),” she said.

The “Phobia” actress, who will be seen mentoring budding filmmakers in MTV’s upcoming digital show “Fame-istan”, says there has to be a more organised platform for people to work.

“There has to be more professional platforms as well as rules in place which is slowly happening.”

Sexual abuse has been a topic of debate in Bollywood and Hollywood. Prominent names from the entertainment industry are discussing how men in power take advantage of women in exchange for taking forward their dreams.

The sexual harassment saga started when a media house published a story in October revealing numerous accusations of sexual abuse against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.

But why are no names taken in the case of casting couch in Bollywood?

“Because of fear, because people who have great ambitions are afraid. They think of what will happen to them if they take somebody’s name who has so much power. That’s what I am saying. Everybody has to speak up,” she added.

Radhika ventured into Bollywood in 2005 with “Vaah! Life Ho Toh Aisi!” and since then has explored genres like thriller, drama and adult comedy with films like “Rakht Charitra”, “Shor in the City”, “Badlapur”, “Parched” and “Hunterrr”.

Was it a conscious decision to act less in commercial entertainers?

Radhika said: “Nothing like that. You have to choose from the work that you have. You can’t say that ‘I want that’ if that’s not been offered to you. So, whatever is offered to you, you choose from that. You make your choice whatever you feel is going to be more challenging or something that inspires you or excites you.”

She says she makes her choices in the “spur of the moment” with whatever she feels intuitively. “I am not a very big planner.” (IANS)

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UN Brings the World Together to Fight Violence Against Women and Girls; 1 in Every 3 Women Currently Face Gender-based Oppression Globally

A third of all women experience violence at some point in their lives, and that figure is twice as high in some countries, according to the United Nations

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Violence against women
Head of U.N. Women Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka speaks on stage at WE Day U.N. at The Theater at Madison Square Garden, in New York City (VOA)

United Nations, September 21, 2017 : World leaders meeting at the United Nations on Wednesday launched a half-billion-dollar effort to end violence against women and girls, a crime suffered by 1 in 3 in their lifetimes.

The effort will fund anti-violence programs that promote prevention, bolster government policies and provide women and girls with improved access to services”, organizers said.

It will take particular aim at all categories of violence against women- human trafficking, femicide and family violence.

A third of all women experience violence at some point in their lives, and that figure is twice as high in some countries, according to the United Nations.

“Gender-based violence is the most dehumanizing form of gender oppression. It exists in every society, in every country rich and poor, in every religion and in every culture,” Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, head of U.N. Women, said as the United Nations held its annual General Assembly.

“If there was anything that was ever universal, it is gender inequality and the violence that it breeds against women,” she said.

In other forms of violence against women and girls, more than 700 million women worldwide were married before they were 18, and at least 200 million women and girls have undergone female genital mutilation in 30 countries, according to U.N. figures.

The initiative of 500 million euros (US$595 million) was launched by the U.N. and the European Union, which is its main contributor, organizers said.

“The initiative has great power,” said Ashley Judd, a Hollywood actress and goodwill ambassador for the U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA) who participated in Wednesday’s announcement.

ALSO READ Violence against Women and Girls Imposes Large-scale Costs on Families, Communities and Economies, says UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

“There are already so many effective, research-based, data-driven programs,” Judd told the Thomson Reuters Foundation ahead of the announcement. “Financing for existing programs is a beautiful thing.

“It also makes an incredibly powerful statement to show that the world is increasingly cohesive around stopping gender-based violence,” she said. (VOA)