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Pune to host the debut of India’s Sports Literature festival from February 21

On the occasions of the 40th anniversary of his first book 'Sunny Days', batting legend Sunil Gavaskar will narrate hilarious stories of his early days in cricket

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SporTale- Sports Literature Festival (representational image, source- Pixabay)

New Delhi, Feb 15, 2017: Pune will play host to India’s maiden sports literature festival ‘SporTale’, a two-day event which will feature as many as 38 luminaries from the field of sports, media, cinema, books and photography.

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From Virender Sehwag’s exploits on Twitter to stories that helped shape Virat Kohli’s victorious journeys, many untold sports tales will be on the cards when the event begins here on February 21.

Sharing the inside stories of their journeys and trade will be 15 sports stars, nine sports journalists, five novelists, and four cine-stars, told PTI

Among those who have a connect with sports and sports biopics, three advertising gurus will also be part of the festival. Photographers who captured the iconic sporting moments through their lenses will also join in.

The man to redefine cricket ethos, Kohli will share the stage with Vijay Lokapally, the senior cricketer writer with the Hindu and author of Kohli’s cricketing journey ‘Driven’.

According to PTI, Indian sports biggest sensation Dipa Karmakar along with her coach Bishweshwar Nandi will also be present to talk about an expedition from a remote town to conquer the world and etch India’s impression on global gymnastics.

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On the occasions of the 40th anniversary of his first book ‘Sunny Days’, batting legend Sunil Gavaskar will narrate hilarious stories of his early days in cricket to another former batting great VVS Laxman.

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Physical Activities Powers Kids to Fight Emotional Distress: Study

Being less emotionally distressed at the juncture between elementary and high school is a priceless benefit for children as they are about to enter a much larger universe with bigger academic challenges

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IOC, Olympic, India, tokyo games, pakistan
FILE - Shimaa Hashad of Egypt takes part in a pratice session with an air rifle at the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) World Cup at Dr. Karni Singh Shooting Range, in New Delhi, Feb. 20, 2019. VOA

Parents, please take note. Kids who engage in organised physical activity at a young age are less likely to have emotional difficulties later in life, says a study.

Besides keeping children from being sedentary, physical activities such as structured sports have the potential to be enriching, both physically and mentally, said the study, published in the journal Pediatric Research.

“The elementary school years are a critical time in child development, and every parent wants to raise a well-adjusted child,” said study lead author Frederic N. Briere, Professor at the University of Montreal in Canada.

For the study, the researchers took data from a cohort of children born in 1997 or 1998. They examined whether consistent participation in organised sport from ages six to 10 would minimize risks associated with emotional distress, anxiety, shyness, and social withdrawal at age 12.

Women's sports and the surrounding sexism
Women’s sports (Representational image). Pixabay

“The results revealed that children who participated consistently from ages six to 10 showed fewer instances of those factors at age 12 than their counterparts who did not engage in physical activity in a consistent way,” said Briere.

Also Read- Study Finds Consuming Poultry as Bad as Red Meats for Cholesterol

“Getting kids actively involved in organised sport seems to promote global development. This involvement appears to be good on a socio-emotional level and not just because of physical benefits,” he added.

Being less emotionally distressed at the juncture between elementary and high school is a priceless benefit for children as they are about to enter a much larger universe with bigger academic challenges, said the researcher. (IANS)