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Quotas for women to reduce Gender Discrimination and to help them advance in Leadership Positions

The government is also committed to 33 per cent reservation in Parliamentary and State assemblies for women through a Constitutional amendment

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Quotas for women
Women empowerment, wikimedia

New Delhi, Jan 13, 2017: In an attempt to reduce gender discrimination Union Minister Anupriya Patel today favoured establishing quotas for women. This will help them compete in mixed-gender environments and advance in leadership roles. This step is taken keeping in mind that companies and public offices with women at senior positions tend to do better.

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While mentioning the other details she also said that the government is also committed to 33 per cent reservation in Parliamentary and State assemblies for women through a Constitutional amendment.

The Minister of State for Health and Family Welfare said here at an Assocham event that “Research has shown that companies perform better during economic turbulence when they have women on their boards, and communities with women in public offices have greater investment in public goods.”

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Patel said that one of the effective ways to help women advance in leadership positions and enhance their decision-making role “could be establishing quotas,” although she did not specify the areas for establishing the quotas to women.

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This can increase “women’s willingness to compete in competitive mixed-gender environments resulting in more qualified candidates, men and women alike, applying for competitive positions,” said Patel, who herself is an SRCC (Shri Ram College of Commerce) Graduate from Delhi University.

“Also, modelling female leadership can go a long way,” she added while addressing the BIMSTEC-SAARC Women’s Economic Forum organised by Assocham.

In order to build a stronger economic life across all sectors and achieve internationally agreed goals for development and sustainability, Patel has favoured this decision for empowering women.

 – prepared by Saptaparni Goon of NewsGram. Twitter: @saptaparni_goon

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)