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Race as a tool to keep people Divided: Will Science break the Shackles?

Race as a concept has been used by humans to divide and create divisions among us for deriving economical and political gains.

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Race: Are We So Different at Chicago History Museum
Race is still a big deal in USA and other parts of the World. Pic by Dr. Munish Raizada taken at the Race exhibition at Chicago History Museum. November 2017
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Chicago:

Last week I along with my family went to see an exhibit on Race that is being currently held at Chicago History Museum until July 2018. Developed by American Anthropological Association (AAA), theme of the exhibit is: “Race: Are We So Different?”

The answer is: No, we are not!

There is only one human race, and that is Homo Sapiens.

There are no sub-races in humans. We all humans constitute one race, despite the differences in our colors and contours, morphological features. The latter are largely explained by science.

However, it goes with out saying that Race as a concept has been used  by us to divide and create divisions among us for deriving economical and political gains. In the name of superior Vs inferior race, people have been subjugated, persecuted and killed. History tells us that, genocides have been carried out, citing the basis of race.

Whereas science and anthropological studies have solidified that we the current or Modern human species (Homo sapiens) are all descendants of our forefathers originating from Africa. Evidence shows that about 60,000 years ago, some of our African ancestors (therefore Blacks) started spreading out to other parts of world. Some reached Asia (including India) and others of course to Eurasia and the current Western hemisphere.This implies that we all form one race, called Human Race.

Exhibition on Race at Chicago History Museum
We might look different, but are we so different? This is the theme of the exhibit on Race being held at Chicago History Museum. Pic taken by Dr Munish Raizada Nov 19,2017

This anthropological facts backed increasingly with sophisticated genetics tools accessible now will change our understanding more and more in coming years. Indian nationalists will also be for a shock because their premise of preserving Indians as a very special civilization that uniquely originated in India will be difficult to maintain as the scientific concepts reach to the the public in more easy- to- understand style.

The scientific fact about race makes many people uncomfortable. Because this is a strong antidote to the man-made idea of Race. Historically, Race and color have been used to create power structures and inequalities within human societies. In the game of black and white, many find it hard to digest when confronted with the idea that their forefathers were blacks (coming from Africa).

Now, let us apply this fact to religion. The latter is also a man made concept. Religion (in contrast to spirituality) though seemingly a unifier, has historically played a mixed role. It has molded civilizations after civilizations, but no one will deny that much of the bloodshed, conflict and violence has emanated from the womb of religion.

Despite all this, we are living in exciting times of science and technology. The marvels of science are exploding at an unprecedented speed. The research into medicine, human genome project, human brain project, space and quantum or particle physics are already enhancing our understanding of ourselves and the Universe in a manner unknown previously. Through research into consciousness and ageing, humanity will see new victories in years and decades to come.

The rapid emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) will catapult the World – for better or Worse, ‘God” only knows! But, I will agree with what Stephen Hawkins is saying: It is time for the humans to move to other planets before AI starts consuming or replacing humans.

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Google Gave Notice of it’s First Private Transatlantic Subsea Cable Project

Google picked undersea communications technology firm TE SubCom to design, manufacture and lay the cable for Dunant

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Google earlier became the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable with its investment in the Curie cable. Pixabay

 In line with its global Cloud infrastructure expansion plans, Google has revealed its first private transAtlantic subsea cable project designed to bring high-bandwidth, low-latency and highly secure Cloud connections between the US and Europe.

Named Dunant, after Henri Dunant, the first Nobel Peace Prize winner and founder of the Red Cross, the cable is expected to become available in late 2020, Google’s Strategic Negotiator Jayne Stowell wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

Google picked undersea communications technology firm TE SubCom to design, manufacture and lay the cable for Dunant.

“This cable crosses the Atlantic Ocean from Virginia Beach in the US to the French Atlantic coast, and will expand our network – already the world’s largest — to help us better serve our users and customers,” Stowell said.

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Google unveils first private subsea cable project. Pixabay

Google earlier became the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable with its investment in the Curie cable.

“Cables are often built to serve a very specific route. When we build privately, we can choose this route based on what will provide the lowest latency for the largest segment of customers,” Stowell said while offering the rationale behind the decision to build Dunant privately.

Also Read-Google Rolls out ‘Morse Code’ Support on Gboard for iOS

“In this case, we wanted connectivity across the Atlantic that was close to certain data centres, but the reasons could also include the ability to land in certain countries, or to connect two places that were previously underserved, such as was the case with Curie,” Stowell added.

Google also took into consideration factors such as capacity and bandwidth for the decision. (IANS)