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Racial bias against Indians in Trinidad and Tobago

DH Singh voices his concern for continued racial discrimination against Indo-Trinidadians

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A Hindu temple near Port of Spain in Trinidad and Tobago. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Dear Editor:

On Saturday 16th April 2016 I had the privilege of listening to Lenox Grant delivering the feature address in the launch of a book titled “ The Hindu View of Trinidad and Tobago, “ a collection of articles by Sat Maharaj and edited by Kumar Mahabir.

While I enjoyed Lenox Grant’s speech for his striving for balance, I must confess that he has unconsciously or unwittingly perpetuated misconceptions or stereotypes  of Indian society and leadership. For example, the sceptre or mukdar that Sat holds in his hand and depicted in the cover of the text could not be accepted by Lenox Grant. He wrote:  “I hear the golden ornamental staff of office is called a mukdar. But I prefer sceptre-or Hindu magic wand.”

Lenox Grant should appreciate that the Hindus have their labels for the objects that are part of their culture and tradition. If the Hindus label it a ‘mukdar’ then that should have been good enough for him. But not so. He went on: “ I prefer sceptre –or Hindu magic wand.”  A similar attitude is also witnessed in the ad by the Guardian Newspaper featuring the top SEA pupil for 2015 where the Hindi word “dhanyavaad” was removed and replaced with “thank you.” The Guardian Newspaper could not tolerate “dhanyavaad” as much as Grant “prefer sceptre –or HIndu magic wand.” Is Grant saying that he has a phobia for Hindi-sounding words?

A Hindu holyman making purchases in Debe, Trinidad and Tobago. Wikimedia Commons
A Hindu holyman making purchases in Debe, Trinidad and Tobago. Wikimedia Commons

Grant in typical “Creole style” went on to label Sat’s social commentaries as “race talk.” He wrote: “Sat Maharaj has gained notoriety in what I have called T&T race talk.”  Interestingly, he brought into his address the recent pronouncement of Minister Garcia that there was  bias in the distribution of scholarships. Is Grant simply brushing aside that serious allegation of Minister Garcia as simply “race talk” and nothing more?

Grant did not stop there but went on to lump former columnists and letter writers as simply race talk. He wrote: “Over nearly three decades, I have been paying attention to race talk” and went on to identify  Noor Kumar Mahabir, Kamal Persad, Anil Mahabir and  Rajnie Ramlakhan, Indrani Rampersad and Rabindranath (Raviji) Maharaj. I feel deeply disappointed that Grant could so easily dismiss the writings and concerns raised by the  Indo-Trinidadian community as simply race talk. Why couldn’t Grant interpret the writings of those columnists as a cry for social justice in a society where they felt like second class citizens?

Grant continued:” I played a part in making such media access possible to people fired up as part of a prevailing mood and motivation resembling that of an Indo-Trinidadian renaissance. I could more easily picture him wielding a cutlass in—at least metaphorical—defence of the interests of Hindus, and of Indians, and of deserving others in this country.”  And Grant has now said it all –“I could more easily picture him wielding a cutlass…”

I would like to write a conclusion to this piece but I would refrain from doing so as I leave it to the readers.

D.H.Singh,

Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago

  • Ran Nam

    My question is, who asked this man Lennox Grant to give the feature address at the launch of Sat’s book on The Hindu View of Trinidad and Tobago? That person should be given a few blows with the mukdar! For Grant to give an informed address on the book he should know something substantial about the Hindu view in Trinidad. Which he doesn’t, as far as I know. This is disgraceful. You would have gotten a better address from Selwyn Cudjoe who at least respects Sat Maharaj and must have learned something about the Hindu view from his many debates with Sat. Why couldn’t the organizers of this function asked a qualified Hindu leader to give the feature address???

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  • Ran Nam

    My question is, who asked this man Lennox Grant to give the feature address at the launch of Sat’s book on The Hindu View of Trinidad and Tobago? That person should be given a few blows with the mukdar! For Grant to give an informed address on the book he should know something substantial about the Hindu view in Trinidad. Which he doesn’t, as far as I know. This is disgraceful. You would have gotten a better address from Selwyn Cudjoe who at least respects Sat Maharaj and must have learned something about the Hindu view from his many debates with Sat. Why couldn’t the organizers of this function asked a qualified Hindu leader to give the feature address???

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Around 56% Indians Fall Victim to Discount Scams During Online Holiday Shopping, Reveals McAfee

"As threat actors continue to enhance their techniques and explore new creative means of theft, it is crucial that users are mindful of potential risks and undertake necessary measures to protect themselves this holiday season," advised Krishnapur

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The survey revealed a staggering number (52.6 per cent) between the age of 18 to 24 years faced the brunt of romance scams, and 60 per cent millennials agree to being scammed by e-greetings. Pixabay

With Christmas around the corner, cybersecurity firm McAfee on Tuesday revealed that 56.1 per cent Indians have fallen victim to discount scams by clicking on malicious links during holiday shopping online.

The year-end festivities present a variety of threats to consumers shopping online, with more than half (53.6 per cent) Indians falling victim to scams resulting from deceiving apps, said McAfee’s ‘Christmas Scams Survey’.

At least one in four (28.6 per cent) Indians have lost between Rs 15,000-Rs 20,000 as a result of fake online retail sites, while 78.6 per cent experienced seasonal travel scams through unsolicited and malicious links.

While cybercriminal activity continues to grow in sophistication, popular scams like email phishing (25.3 per cent) and text phishing (21.1 per cent) still result in close to a quarter of Indians being duped throughout the season, said the survey.

“With the sheer volume of people shopping online, they tend to get careless, carried away with discounts, and open themselves to phishing attacks, frauds, malicious websites, and viruses that aim to steal money and personal information,” said Venkat Krishnapur, Vice-President of Engineering and Managing Director, McAfee India.

Throughout the festivities, 60.2 per cent people have fallen victim to robocalling and 57.1 per cent through SIM-jacking.

McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company.
McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company. Wikimedia Commons

A robocall is a phone call that uses a computerized autodialer to deliver a pre-recorded message, as if from a robot.

A new trend that hit unsavvy consumers hard this festive season was through phony gift cards.

Nearly 39.3 per cent Indians were directed to a site, were they were asked to input personal information such as name, telephone number or credit card information, with 40 per cent losing between Rs 10,000 to Rs 15,000.

Leveraging the emotional aspects of philanthropy and generosity, 60.7 per cent were victims of fake charities, with scammers impersonating genuine trusts to ask for donations.

Also Read: US Government Begins Probe into Google Over its Labour Practices

The survey revealed a staggering number (52.6 per cent) between the age of 18 to 24 years faced the brunt of romance scams, and 60 per cent millennials agree to being scammed by e-greetings.

“As threat actors continue to enhance their techniques and explore new creative means of theft, it is crucial that users are mindful of potential risks and undertake necessary measures to protect themselves this holiday season,” advised Krishnapur. (IANS)