Wednesday February 20, 2019

Rajasthan’s Ramsar Village becomes self-reliant: Converts 52-hectare Barren land into Lake

The depth of lake is five feet and has a capacity of 4.08 TMC (thousand million cubic feet) for now

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52 hectares of land then and now. Image Source: Thebetterindia.com
  • The 52 hectares of barren land has now been converted into a lake for water conservation purposes
  • The water body is now replenishing the wells of the village and also of the areas located nearby
  • First showers the lake received a good amount of water, which will now be used to recharge the wells that had dried up this summer

AJMER: After sweating hard for almost five months, the residents of Ramsar, a village in Ajmer, Rajasthan have been successful at converting a barren piece of land into a lake for water conservation purposes.

The 52 hectares of barren land near Bhilo ki Basti in Ramsar was previously used as a dumping ground to throw away garbage collected from the areas nearby.

Speaking to Times of India, Ram Singh Rawat of the village, revealed, “There was a water outlet on this land which worked as a channel to Ramsar lake but over a period of time this channel went dry and the land was left barren.”

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However, now filled with water, the water body is replenishing the wells of the village and also of the areas located near the village.

A dried well. Image Source: Wikipedia.org
A dried well. Image Source: Wikipedia.org

Ramsar region received eight inches of water in pre-monsoon rains, which has filled this lake.

According to a TOI report, District collector Gaurav Goyal, who recently went to inspect the work also congratulated the villagers for contributing towards chief minister’s Jal Sawavlamban Abhiyan.

It was the initiation by district administration that inspired the villagers to develop that piece of land into a lake. Also, because that was a low area and so it was an ideal spot to collect rainwater from the nearby areas.

Exhilarated Goyal said TOI, “This barren land was not in use. We took this land to develop a lake and sanctioned Rs 8 lakh for it. Now you can see the results.”

He further explained that the depth of the lake is five feet and has a capacity of 4.08 TMC (thousand million cubic feet) for now.

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He added that during the first showers the lake received a good amount of water, which will now be used to recharge the wells that had dried up this summer.

It is believed that the lake will make the local farmers self-reliant and will also fulfil the drinking water needs.

Kailash Kumawat, a farmer, explained, “Initially we thought that the administration wanted us to work under MGNREGA and wanted to pay us. We have nothing to do in summer months and so came out to dig the land. But to our pleasant surprise now we have water in our well.”

Brimming with optimism villagers are already sowing seeds and are certain that they will get water for irrigation on time.

-This article is modified by Bulbul Sharma, a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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  • Aparna Gupta

    It is really a good idea to convert a barren land into a lake. It will provide employment to the people and will help in utilising the land judiciously.

Next Story

Rajasthan’s Leading Properties Go Green To Follow The Sustainable Route

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

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Famous Forts in India
Amer fort, Jaipur, Rajasthan (Pic Credits : Elene Machaidze)

From plastic straws to copper vessels, handmade lamps and bangles, Rajasthan’s leading hospitality players here are establishing new trends by engaging local artisans to showcase traditional artistry to guests and serving them locally-inspired cuisine amid green surroundings.

“We have initiated the use of paper-made straws; there is no use of plastic bags anywhere in the hotel property and the local-inspired food is being served to guests to ensure the locals have a regular source of income,” Binny Sebastian, General Manager, Bishangarh’s Alila Fort heritage hotel, some 50 km from here, told IANS.

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

organic farming
Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

“Our association with the locals is quite strong. Working with them, we take our guests to the local temple. They also visit the artisans’ houses and sip tea there while watching them make pottery and weave carpet. In this way, we ensure that locals get a decent livelihood,” Sebastian added.

“We have started getting regular income since this property came up a year back. We have been showing our art to the guests here which gives us satisfaction as well as an income,” said Nizamuddin, a bangle maker.

Ashok S. Rathore, General Manager of the Rambagh Palace, said: “We have curtailed the use of plastic. There are no plastic straws being used on the property. We serve in glass bottles instead of plastic water bottles.”

This property is also adopting sustainable routes to ensure that the locals get decent income opportunities for their sustenance.

Famous forts in India
Chittorgarh Fort, Rajasthan (Wikimedia Commons)

“Our interiors are reminiscent of handmade interiors. Our suites are adorned with Thikri art, a rare gold-dipped miniature artwork of Rajasthan. But skilled artists are disappearing and it comes with a high cost of production,” said Rathore.

Also Read: Stop “Stereotyping” Northeast, States Hold Strong Cultural Harmony

Fairmont Jaipur has incorporated the fine craftsmanship and beauty of the local cultural heritage and artisans of Jaipur. The ceilings are hand-painted by local artisans with complex motifs.

“We associate with the local artisans to showcase their talent at the hotel in the form of the evening entertainment, the welcome experience and celebrate the local heritage of Rajasthan,” said Srijan Vadhera, General Manager, Fairmont Jaipur. (IANS)