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Ramdev’s suggestion to Smriti Irani: Incorporate elements of traditional ‘Gurukul’ system in modern education



By NewsGram Staff Writer

Yoga guru Baba Ramdev has sent a detailed proposal to Human and Resource Development (HRD) minister, Smriti Irani, to amalgamate the traditional ‘Gurukul’ system with the modern education.

According to a news report, Ramdev’s confederate, Acharya Balkrishna, met the HRD minister on 9th April and submitted the proposal on behalf of the Yoga guru.

“This is not just our view. We have done a lot of research and found that several consultations of the government with the states and other consultative bodies such as Central Advisory Board of Education (CABE) have found that there is a need for an education system that is a mix of modern curriculum and Indian culture and values. We have collected all of these suggestions to make a strong case for our idea,” Balkrishna told The Economic Times.

Balkrishna added that for the proposal, Acharyakulam, the school run by Ramdev in Haridwar, has been taken as a prototype. This school educates around 400 boys and girls from class five to seven in classical subjects like Sanskrit, the Vedas and the Shastras along with the NCERT syllabus.

A few months back, Ramdev had also presented the idea to ‘Indianise’ education. He put forward an idea of starting a new national school board similar to CBSE, but with an Indian name like, ‘Bhartiya Board of Secondary Education (BBSE).’

Balkrishna told the newspaper, “The government’s attitude is positive. We had a nice meeting with the minister in which she gave us a good hearing. Now it’s just a matter of implementation.”

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS