Sunday December 8, 2019

Regular Sleep in Childhood Leads to Healthy BMI Later

The findings, published in the journal SLEEP, showed that one-third of children consistently adhered to age-appropriate bedtimes for ages five to nine

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The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.
The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection. Pixabay

Is your child facing trouble in sleeping? If so, parents take note. Regular and sufficient sleep from early childhood may be important for gaining healthy body weight in adolescence, suggests a new study.

The study revealed that those who had no bedtime routine at age nine had shorter self-reported sleep duration and higher body mass index (BMI) at age 15, when compared to those children with age-appropriate bedtimes.

“We think sleep affects physical and mental health, and the ability to learn,” said Orfeu Buxton, Professor from the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

“Parenting practices in childhood affect physical health and BMI in the teenage years. Developing a proper routine in childhood is crucial for the future health of the child,” Buxton added.

Previous studies have shown that poor sleep can affect academic performance, as well as contribute to death and cases of heart disease and stroke.

Rest practices
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, researchers analysed 2,196 children.

The findings, published in the journal SLEEP, showed that one-third of children consistently adhered to age-appropriate bedtimes for ages five to nine.

Also Read- LPG Scheme by Narendra Modi Reduced Household Air Pollution, says Study

Bedtime should provide enough of a “window” for the child to get an appropriate amount of sleep, even if the child does not fall asleep right away, said Buxton.

Future family interventions may need to include parental education about sleep health, particularly focusing on parents with low income and low education, Lee said, adding the need for research in childhood sleep behaviour and weight in later life. (IANS)

Next Story

You’ll Soon Require to Increase Your Calorie Intake in Order To Remain Healthy

With rising BMI, as observed in Mexico, and increasing height, as seen in the Netherlands, there would be a further increase in calorie intake by more than 18 per cent

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Calorie
In most countries, average body height and body size is increasing and more Calorie Intake is required to maintain the higher weight. Pixabay

As you scramble to buy some onions for your family despite skyrocketing prices, a rising Body Mass Index (BMI) and an increasing body height is leading to a marked increase in global calorie requirements globally, find researchers.

In most countries, average body height and body size is increasing and more needs to be eaten to maintain the higher weight.

Even if both BMI and height were to remain constant, global calorie requirements would still increase by more than 60 per cent by 2100 because of population growth, said the team from the University of Gottingen in Germany in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The development economist Professor Stephan Klasen and his then doctoral Lutz Depenbusch have designed a scenario to investigate how calorie intake could develop between 2010 and 2100.

Earlier changes in the Netherlands and Mexico were used as a benchmark.

“The developments in these countries are very pronounced,” says Depenbusch, “but they do represent a realistic scenario.”

With rising BMI, as observed in Mexico, and increasing height, as seen in the Netherlands, there would be a further increase in calorie intake by more than 18 per cent.

This means, the increase in global calorie requirements between 2010 and 2100 would be one third larger, reaching a total increase of nearly 80 per cent, said the researchers.

Calorie
As you scramble to buy some onions for your family despite skyrocketing prices, a rising Body Mass Index (BMI) and an increasing body height is leading to a marked increase in global Calorie requirements globally, find researchers. Wikimedia Commons

If global food production does not meet this increased need, this problem will not be controlled by a corresponding decrease in BMI.

While richer people will be able to maintain their eating habits, the poor would suffer greatly from higher prices due to increased demand.

ALSO READ: Genetics Can Affect The Way We Taste Food: Study

“This would lead to increased consumption of cheap food, often rich in calories but poor in nutrients,” said Depenbusch.

“As a result, body weight among the poor would continue to rise alongside malnutrition and poorer health outcomes.” (IANS)