Saturday August 24, 2019

Regular Sleep in Childhood Leads to Healthy BMI Later

The findings, published in the journal SLEEP, showed that one-third of children consistently adhered to age-appropriate bedtimes for ages five to nine

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The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.
The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection. Pixabay

Is your child facing trouble in sleeping? If so, parents take note. Regular and sufficient sleep from early childhood may be important for gaining healthy body weight in adolescence, suggests a new study.

The study revealed that those who had no bedtime routine at age nine had shorter self-reported sleep duration and higher body mass index (BMI) at age 15, when compared to those children with age-appropriate bedtimes.

“We think sleep affects physical and mental health, and the ability to learn,” said Orfeu Buxton, Professor from the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

“Parenting practices in childhood affect physical health and BMI in the teenage years. Developing a proper routine in childhood is crucial for the future health of the child,” Buxton added.

Previous studies have shown that poor sleep can affect academic performance, as well as contribute to death and cases of heart disease and stroke.

Rest practices
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, researchers analysed 2,196 children.

The findings, published in the journal SLEEP, showed that one-third of children consistently adhered to age-appropriate bedtimes for ages five to nine.

Also Read- LPG Scheme by Narendra Modi Reduced Household Air Pollution, says Study

Bedtime should provide enough of a “window” for the child to get an appropriate amount of sleep, even if the child does not fall asleep right away, said Buxton.

Future family interventions may need to include parental education about sleep health, particularly focusing on parents with low income and low education, Lee said, adding the need for research in childhood sleep behaviour and weight in later life. (IANS)

Next Story

Taking Hot Bath at Least 90 Minutes before Bedtime Your can be Ticket to Sound Sleep

Biomedical engineers at University of Texas-Austin reached this conclusion after analyzing thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating

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Hot Bath, Sleep, Bedtime
Just remember that the water temperature should be around 40-42 degrees Celsius, else you may not get better shuteye. Pixabay

 Taking hot bath at least 90 minutes before bedtime is your ticket to sound sleep. Just remember that the water temperature should be around 40-42 degrees Celsius, else you may not get better shuteye.

Biomedical engineers at University of Texas-Austin reached this conclusion after analyzing thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality.

“When we looked through all known studies, we noticed significant disparities in terms of the approaches and findings,” said Shahab Haghayegh, lead author on the paper.

“The only way to make an accurate determination of whether sleep can, in fact, be improved was to combine all the past data and look at it through a new lens.”

Hot Bath, Sleep, Bedtime
Taking hot bath at least 90 minutes before bedtime is your ticket to sound sleep. Pixabay

In collaboration with the UT Health Science Center at Houston and the University of Southern California, the researchers reviewed 5,322 studies.

Meta-analytical tools were used to assess the consistency between relevant studies and showed that an optimum temperature of between 104 and 109 degrees Fahrenheit (40-42 degrees Celsius) improved overall sleep quality.

When scheduled one-two hours before bedtime, it can also hasten the speed of falling asleep by an average of 10 minutes.

It is understood that both sleep and our body’s core temperature are regulated by a circadian clock located within the brain’s hypothalamus that drives the 24-hour patterns of many biological processes, including sleep and wakefulness.

Also Read- Suffering From Low Blood Pressure? Do an Hour or More of Daily Exercise

The average person’s circadian cycle is characterized by a reduction in core body temperature of about 0.5 to 1 Fahrenheit around an hour before usual sleep time — dropping to its lowest level between the middle and later span of night-time sleep.

It then begins to rise, acting as a kind of a biological alarm clock wake-up signal.

The researchers found the optimal timing of bathing for cooling down of core body temperature in order to improve sleep quality is about 90 minutes before going to bed.

“If baths are taken at the right biological time — 1-2 hours before bedtime — they will aid the natural circadian process and increase one’s chances of not only falling asleep quickly but also of experiencing better quality sleep,” showed the findings appeared in the journal Sleep Medicine Reviews. (IANS)