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Religion not the cause for Indian population growth, development is

Education and awareness more significant factors than religion when it comes to determining population growth rate of India.

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Source: Pixabay
An Indian Family Source: Pixabay
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Sept 05, 2016: The phenomena of unrestrained population growth that our country faces are generally attributed to the chaotic religious scenario that fills India.

 But how far this conclusion is from reality?

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According to the cessation made from a recent study conducted by the IndiaSpend analysis of Government data and research evidence, the fertility rates, birth rates, sex ratio and all the aspects of a population are somehow closely related to the literacy, development, edification and financial state of the society. Education of families, especially that of women highly determines the mentality and consequently the status of family growing and family planning.

When the fertility rates for Indian population were released last year, the discussion has strategically deviated to the difference in growth rates with regard to different religions. And it was seen that the percentage of Muslims in India had grown to 14.2% of the total population in 2011, increasing from 13.4% in 2001, while the Hindus have reduced to 79.8% from 80.5%. There was no significant change in the percentage of Christians and Jains as the population growth rates were 2.3% and 0.4%, respectively, while the population growth rate was observed in a declining state of Buddhists from 0.8% to 0.7%, and that of Sikhs from 1.9% to 1.7%.

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The facts if properly examined show that richer(middle class, upper-middle class  , and elite class) families, living with better healthcare amenities, surrounded by a comparatively broader mindset regarding education contribute to lower population growth rates in India. And also on the global platform, there is quite a little evidence to link religion and fertility rates as relating it to poor living conditions, conflict-ridden state situations and lower female empowerment have reported higher population growth rates.

The curious case of Kerala and UP

Taking a significant example of our country by comparing the literacy rates and population growth rates of two states (one from north) Uttar Pradesh and (one from south) Kerala, clears a lot of arguments over this issue.
Kerala has a literacy rate of 93.9%, compared to 69.7% in Uttar Pradesh in 2011. In the same year, 99.7% of mothers in Kerala received proper and necessary medical attention at delivery compared to the 48.4% of mothers in UP. 74.9% of women were above the age of 21 in Kerala at marriage while only 47.6% in Uttar Pradesh.

Economic status of family also works as a factor

The poor families also work on the motto, ‘more heads-more income’, and hence it is observed that families in lower wealth quintiles have more children as compared to the families having more economic stability.

And if factors such as quantity & quality of education, the eminence of healthcare facilities provided, awareness regarding sexual education & family planning is considered, these show much more significance than the religious identity of a family.

More poverty, less education, More children
More poverty, less education, More children Source: Pixabay

Also, according to the 2014 World Bank Data, when two Muslim-countries were compared another connotation was observed:  Bangladesh, India’s Muslim-majority neighbor, had a Total Fertility Rate of 2.2 where Iran, another Muslim country, had a TFR of 1.7 which is even below the replacement level; correspondingly Malaysia & Indonesia (Muslim-majority countries) have a comparatively logical fertility rates of 1.9& 2.5 respectively but Egypt has a TFR of 3.3.

So, if the issue of Indian population growth is observed on a larger scale considering more and more factors that somehow affects this, it can be understood that socioeconomic factors, literacy, rejuvenation, urbanization, mindset, awareness regarding contraceptives, and effectiveness of state policies for development, all determine fertility more than the religious distinctiveness of a person.

-prepared by Arya Sharan

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Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Jagpreet Kaur Sandhu

    A real fact.. which may have overlooked. This can be a reason yes!

  • Kabir Chaudhary

    Education is the key.

  • sujayrao2012@gmail.com

    Yes. But UP and Bihar need to take action

    Sujay Rao Mandavilli

  • Jordan06

    It’s sad that a simple thought of “being a good person” isn’t always present in “religious” leaders. Read this article on Pastor Mark Burns today and let out a heavy sigh…isitfunnyoroffensive.com/trump-surrogate-in-hot-water-over-hillary-blackface-tweet/

  • Jagpreet Kaur Sandhu

    A real fact.. which may have overlooked. This can be a reason yes!

  • Kabir Chaudhary

    Education is the key.

  • sujayrao2012@gmail.com

    Yes. But UP and Bihar need to take action

    Sujay Rao Mandavilli

  • Jordan06

    It’s sad that a simple thought of “being a good person” isn’t always present in “religious” leaders. Read this article on Pastor Mark Burns today and let out a heavy sigh…isitfunnyoroffensive.com/trump-surrogate-in-hot-water-over-hillary-blackface-tweet/

Next Story

India China’s Fight Over the Doklam Plateau Explained

Doklam or Donglang, is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India

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picture from- indiaopines.com

By Ruchika Verma

  • India and China have an old history of disputes
  • This time, the dispute is regarding the Dokplam Plateau
  • The area is of strategic importance for both the nations

Disputes between India and China are not at all uncommon. The rivalry between the two nations is famous. There have been several disputes between the two on the India-China border in past, and there seems to be no stopping for these disputes in the present or future, for that matter.

India and China have a n old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com
India and China have an old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com

In June 2017, the world witnessed yet another dispute arising between India and China. This time the dispute was about China building a road extending to Doklam Plateau, which both nations have been fighting over for years now.

Also Read: China is likely to get involved if India disrupts $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

History of the dispute 

Doklam or Donglang (in Chinese), is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India. India doesn’t directly claim the area but supports Bhutan’s claims on it.

India fits into the picture, as this plateau is an important area for India. Not only is Bhutan one of the biggest allies of India; China gaining access over the Doklam Plateau will also endanger India’s borders, making them vulnerable to attacks.

Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan's borders.
Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan’s borders.

Apart from the hostile history of the two nations, the Doklam Plateau is also important for India to maintain its control over a land corridor that connects to its remote northeastern States. China building a road through Doklam surely threatens that control.

A complete timeline of what happened in the recent Doklam Standoff 

On 16 June 2017, Chinese troops with construction vehicles and excavators began extending an existing road southward on the Doklam plateau, near India’s border. It was Bhutan which raised the alarm for India.

On 18 June 2017, India responded by sending around 270 Indian troops, with weapons and two bulldozers to evict the Chinese troops from Doklam.

On 29 June 2017, Bhutan protested against the construction of a road in the disputed territory.  According to the Bhutanese government, China attempted to extend a road in an area which is shared both Bhutan and India, along with China.

Between 30 June 2017 and 5 July 2017, China released multiple statements justifying their claim over the Doklam plateau. They cited reasons as to why the Doklam standoff wasn’t really needed. And how China has not intruded into India’s territory to incite the standoff.

On 19th July 2017, China asked India again to withdraw its troops from the Doklam. On 24th July 2017,  Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, in his statement, asked India to withdraw and behave themselves to maintain peace.

India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC
India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC

Also Read: Why India Must Counter China’s High-Altitude Land Grab?

What followed till 16th August 2017 was China constantly alleging India of trying to create trouble. They accused India of trying to disturb the peace and not withdrawing the troops, even after repeated reminders. They also accused India of bullying.

India, however, kept quiet during the whole fiasco, only releasing a statement regarding their stand and position at the Doklam standoff.

On 28 August 2017, India and China finally announced that they had agreed to pull their troops back from the Doklam standoff. The withdrawal was completed on that very day.

On 7 September 2017, many media reports claimed that both nation’s troops have not left the site completely. They were still patrolling the area, simply having moved 150 meters away from their previous position.

On 9 October 2017, China announced that it is ready to maintain peace with India at the frontiers. India reacted in affirmative, the peace was established when Indian Defence Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman’s visited Nathu La.

The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay
The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay

The Doklam issue, for now, is resolved. However, given the history of disputes between India and China, it won’t be a surprise if the issue resurfaces again in near future.