Back in focus! Places of Worship Act revives historic unsolved disputes.

In the recent survey conducted at the Gyanvapi Masjid, many important pieces of evidence about the history of the site have been found. The Shivling found in the premises of the nearby well has also been sealed after the orders of the court.
Back in focus! Places of Worship Act revives historic unsolved disputes.
There has been a rise in petitions in the country's courts for the survey of many mosques like the Gyanwapi Masjid in Varanasi and Shahi Idgah Masjid in Mathura.Pixabay

The discussion about the 'Places of Worship Act' and several Mosques built by Mughals across the country by destroying Hindu temples is intensifying throughout the country. There has been a rise in petitions in the country's courts for the survey of many mosques like the Gyanwapi Masjid in Varanasi and Shahi Idgah Masjid in Mathura.

In the recent survey conducted at the Gyanvapi Masjid, many important pieces of evidence about the history of the site have been found. The Shivling found in the premises of the nearby well has also been sealed after the orders of the court.

Many Muslim parties along with the AIMIM Chief Asaduddin Owaisi, are calling the survey unconstitutional. The Muslim side has highlighted the Places of Worship (Special Provisions) Act 1991 for fortifying their unconstitutional remark on the survey. Let us know what the act is all about?

What is the Places of Worship Act?

The Places of Worship (Special Provisions) Act was created in 1991 during the Congress government led by the then PM PV Narasimha Rao. According to the act, every place of worship of every religion in the country will maintain the same status as it existed on the 15th day of August 1947. The act ensured that the status quo of every place of worship in the country will be maintained except for Ayodhya's disputed Babri Masjid/Ram Mandir.

What does the law say?

According to the law, no one can make even the smallest of changes in any religious place in the country. Even if a religious structure was built after the demolition or destruction of another religious structure (before or after the independence), then too, the status quo of the structure cannot be changed. The law enforces the state to maintain the status quo of all the religious places and structures in the country.

Mosques on which the Hindu side has raised claims:

Gyanvapi Masjid: On the matter of the Gyanvapi Masjid dispute in Varanasi, the Hindu side argues that the Masjid was constructed by Aurangzeb in 1669 after he demolished the historic Kashi Vishwanath Shiva Temple.

Shahi Idgah Mosque: Here, the Hindu side says that the mosque stands on the birthplace of the Lord Shri Krishna in Mathura, and was built by demolishing the age-old temple of the Hindu god.

Taj Mahal: The petitioners claim that instead of the Taj Mahal, previously there used to be a Shiv temple - Tejo Mahalaya. The controversy has recently caught fume.

Qutub Minar: The demand for changing the name of Delhi's Qutub Minar to Vishnu Pillar has gained much attention recently. It is claimed that there stood around 27 temples in the Qutub Minar complex. All the 27 temples were destroyed to make way for the current structures present at the location.

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