Tuesday June 25, 2019

Renovation of first Hindu Temple of the Western World almost complete

The magnificent Old Temple in San Francisco is claimed to be the “first Hindu temple in the Western World”

0
//
renovation
A hindu temple (representative image). Pixabay

San Francisco, Mar 13, 2017: The historic and extremely expensive renovation process of the magnificent Old Temple in San Francisco, which is claimed to be the “first Hindu temple in the Western World”, is almost complete.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Old Temple, originally known as Hindu Temple is said to be built within four months. It is a part of the Vedanta Society of Northern California (VSNC), launched by Swami Vivekananda, a highly respected Hindu Monk 1900.

This Temple, sometimes referred as “sermon in the form of a building” and “dedicated to the cause of humanity”, miraculously survived the San Francisco earthquake and fire of April 1906.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

During the renovation process which was launched in 2014, the historic character of the temple was claimed to be uncompromised while bringing it up to current standards. The complete renovation included upgrading from foundation to rooftop regarding seismic upgrades, deepening of foundation, plumbing, wiring, fire-sprinkler system, energy efficiency, roofing, etc. It is planned to be open to the public and ready to use sometime in the spring. It was recently re-consecrated with ritual worship by monks and nuns from India, Canada and USA.

Located on Webster Street in San Francisco, this Old Temple was designed by Swami Trigunatitananda with architect Joseph A. Leonard, blending elements of East and West. Its style is influenced by old-fashioned Bengal temples, Shiva temples at Dakshineswar, Benares temples, etc. The building represents a striking profile of towers, domes, and pinnacles; and its various towers “are intended to symbolize the harmony of all religions and the pointed arches and domes the upward aspiration of the spiritual seeker”.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

Rajan Zed, a distinguished Hindu statesman commended efforts of the Society leaders and area community towards executing the thorough and elaborate renovation of this magnificent and important Hindu temple.

President of Universal Society of Hinduism, Rajan Zed, requested the Hindu community in USA, about 3 million strong, to work towards preserving the historical Hindu temples and passing on Hindu spirituality, concepts and traditions to coming generations, reported the Asian American Press.

VSNC is affiliated to worldwide spiritual movement Ramakrishna Mission headquartered in Belur Math on the outskirts of Kolkata (India). Besides Old Temple and New Temple in San Francisco; it also maintains Vedanta Retreat in Olema (Marin County, California) founded in 1946 and which occupies over 2000 coastal acres, 160-acres Shanti Ashrama Retreat in Santa Clara County (California) launched in 1900, monastery and convent. Swami Tattwamayananda is Minister-In Charge of VSNC.

Vedanta was introduced to America by Swami Vivekananda at the 1893 Parliament of Religions in Chicago. Since then, the order has more than 180 centres worldwide which includes, California, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Illinois,  Michigan, Missouri, Oregon, Rhode Island, New York and Washington.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

Ideology of Ramakrishna Mission, founded in 1897 by Swami Vivekananda and named after his teacher/inspiration Sri Ramakrishna (1836-1886) and whose current president is Swami Atmasthananda, consists of the eternal principles of Vedanta; while its basic principles include: “God realization is the ultimate goal of life, potential divinity of the soul, harmony of religions,” etc. Its motto is: Atmano mokshartham jagat hitaya cha (For one’s own salvation and for the welfare of the world). It claims to aim at the harmony of religions, harmony of the East and the West, harmony of the ancient and the modern, spiritual fulfillment, all-round development of human faculties, social equality, and peace for all humanity; without any distinctions of creed, caste, race or nationality.

Prepared by Nikita Saraf, Twitter: @niki_saraf

Next Story

“They Don’t Make Prayerful Offerings When They Harvest,” Story Of The Native American Church

“The extraordinary and the phenomenon are not necessarily unexpected, but they are definitely not precluded.”

0
Church
The sun sets over the gateway of peyotera Amada Cardenas's house in Mirando City, Texas. Ironwork reflects core Native American Church values of faith, hope, love and charity. VOA

Back in the day, when the “grandmas and grandpas” of the Native American Church (NAC) needed peyote, they would make a 2,000-kilometer pilgrimage from the reservations of South Dakota to the tiny town of Mirando City, Texas, close to the U.S. border with Mexico. That’s where they could find Amada Cardenas, a Mexican-American woman who at the time was the only peyote dealer in Texas.

Cardenas was not Native American, nor was she a member of the NAC. But she understood how sacred the medicine was to church members and defended its use as a religious sacrament to those who sought to ban it.

Amada Cardenas, holding a basket of peyote, outside of her home in Mirando City, Texas, 1994.
Amada Cardenas, holding a basket of peyote, outside of her home in Mirando City, Texas, 1994. VOA

“After Amada’s passing, the peyote distribution system lost heart and seemed to be about monetary compensation,” said Iron Rope, former chairman of the Native American Church of North America (NACNA) and today chairman of the NAC of South Dakota. He is concerned that the remaining three or four peyote dealers in Texas — all non-Native — don’t give “the medicine” the reverence they should.

“They don’t make prayerful offerings when they harvest,” Iron Rope said. “We’ve heard reports about intoxicated harvesters. Sometimes, the medicine that comes to us was mushy or small, and the harvesting technique was not one that would allow regrowth.”

Careless and sometimes illegal harvesting, along with increased land and resource development in Texas, has led to a decline in peyote’s quality and availability. Prices have gone up, and church members worry the cactus, now listed as a vulnerable species, could become endangered.

In 2013, NACNA began researching ways to conserve peyote and its natural habitat.

Lophophora williamsii, more commonly known as peyote, which grows in the wild in southern Texas and Mexico.
Lophophora williamsii, more commonly known as peyote, which grows in the wild in southern Texas and Mexico. VOA

Pan-Native religion

Peyote, or Lophophora williamsii, is a succulent that contains psychoactive alkaloids and only grows in southern Texas and a handful of states in northern Mexico.

Indigenous people have used it ceremonially and medicinally for centuries, as noted by 16th century Spanish missionaries, who condemned it as an evil. Peyote use persisted, however, and by the late 1800s, had spread to present-day Oklahoma, where tribes adapted it to suit their individual spiritual traditions.

In the face of government efforts to ban peyote, peyotists in the early 20th century sought to incorporate as a formal religion. In 1918, an intertribal group established the NAC, which has evolved to include tens of thousands of members across dozens of tribal nations. Members view the church as an important component of healing from historic trauma and reconnecting to tradition.

Peyote was banned in the United States in 1970, but the law was later amended to allow peyote to be used in “bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native American Church.”

Texas allows several peyoteros registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency to harvest and sell peyote, but only to card-carrying NAC members with proven Native American ancestry.

Peyote buttons are shown in the yard of a peyote dealer in Rio Grande, Texas, Oct. 12, 2007.
Peyote buttons are shown in the yard of a peyote dealer in Rio Grande, Texas, Oct. 12, 2007. VOA

‘A beautiful ceremony’

Unlike other religious denominations, said Iron Rope, the NAC is not a unified theology.

“Different variations of the ceremony have come into play,” he said. “There are Christian aspects to the NAC today and traditional aspects, as well.”

Wynema Morris, a member of the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska and an NAC member, grew up with an understanding of the sacredness of peyote and the religious etiquette surrounding its use.

“It was my own grandfather, Samuel Thomas Gilpin, who actually received peyote early on from the Winnebagos, a neighboring tribe, and passed it on to his sons, my uncles,” she said.

This 1924 photo by Edward S. Curtis is entitled "Cheyenne Peyote Leader." Courtesy: Library of Congress.
This 1924 photo by Edward S. Curtis is entitled “Cheyenne Peyote Leader.” Courtesy: Library of Congress. VOA

Peyote is much misunderstood and maligned, she said, viewed by many anthropologists through the lens of colonial prejudice.

“I don’t like their use of the word ‘hallucinations,’” she said. “You don’t use peyote to get high. You use it to pray and communicate with God — the same God everyone else talks to.”

She described all-night services of prayer, song and meditation.

“The ceremony is beautiful,” she said. “The extraordinary and the phenomenon are not necessarily unexpected, but they are definitely not precluded.”

Sacred gardens

In 2013, NACNA began looking at ways to conserve and sustain peyote for future generations of indigenous Americans, Mexicans and Canadians.

“It was our intent to eventually have our own land and be able to have our own peyote dealer who could understand our concerns as the Native American Church,” said Iron Rope.

The sun sets over "the 605," acreage in Thompsonville, Texas, which the Indigenous Peyote Conservation purchased in 2018 for the conservation of peyote, a sacrament of the Native American Church.
The sun sets over “the 605,” acreage in Thompsonville, Texas, which the Indigenous Peyote Conservation purchased in 2018 for the conservation of peyote, a sacrament of the Native American Church. VOA

In 2017, NACNA and partner organizations formally launched the Indigenous Peyote Conservation Initiative (IPCI). With funding from the Riverstyx Foundation, a nonprofit that supports research of medicinal uses of psychoactive plants, IPCI purchased 245 hectares (605 acres) of land in Thompsonville, Texas, to serve as “Sacred Peyote Gardens.”

Also Read: Practice What You Preach: Celebrities Should Stand By Their Public Image In Private Domain

It is their hope that by 2021, “the 605” will house a nursery, residential and guest housing, and youth training, all supported by peyote sales.

“It’s about generations to come,” said Iron Rope. “To reconnect them to the land and to the medicine. And that’s the healing process that we’ve been missing.” (VOA)