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Researchers Turn Carbon Emissions into Usable Energy

With the "Hybrid Na-CO2" System, the conversion efficiency of CO2 is high at 50 per cent at this time

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EMission, carbon dioxide
Researchers turn carbon emissions into usable energy. VOA

A team of researchers has developed a system that produces electricity and hydrogen while eliminating carbon dioxide (CO2), which is the main contributor of global warming.

The team from the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea created a “Hybrid Na-CO2” system that can continuously produce electrical energy and hydrogen through efficient CO2 conversion, with stable operation for over 1,000 hour without any damage to electrodes.

“The key to that technology is the easy conversion of chemically stable CO2 molecules to other materials. Our new system has solved this problem with CO2 dissolution mechanism,” said Professor Guntae Kim from the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST.

Much of human CO2 emissions are absorbed by the ocean and turned into acidity.

Car Emissions, carbon dioxide
Morning rush hour traffic makes its way along US 101 near downtown Los Angeles, California, Nov. 15, 2016. VOA

The researchers focused on this phenomenon and came up with the idea of melting CO2 into water to induce an electrochemical reaction.

If acidity increases, the number of protons increases, which in turn increases the power to attract electrons.

If a battery system is created based on this phenomenon, electricity can be produced by removing CO2.

Also Read- Chronic Doctor Shortage Affecting Delhi Government-run Hospitals

With the “Hybrid Na-CO2” System, the conversion efficiency of CO2 is high at 50 per cent at this time.

“This hybrid Na-CO2 cell not only utilises CO2 as the resource for generating electrical energy but also produces the clean energy source, hydrogen,” said Jeongwon Kim from UNIST in a paper published in the journal iScience. (IANS)

Next Story

Google to Neutralise Carbon Emission for Device Shipments by 2020

According to the company, from 2017 to 2018, its carbon emissions for product shipments decreased by 40 per cent

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google, online tracking
A man walks past a Google sign outside with a span of the Bay Bridge at rear in San Francisco, May 1, 2019. VOA

Tech giant Google has announced a string of sustainability pledges for its hardware and has said that it aims to neutralise carbon emissions from delivering consumer hardware like Pixel phones and Google Home Minis by 2020.

“By 2020, 100 per cent of all shipments going to or from customers will be carbon neutral. Starting in 2022, 100 per cent of Made by Google products will include recycled materials with a drive to maximize recycled content wherever possible,” Anna Meegan, Head of Sustainability, Consumer Hardware, wrote in a blog post on Monday.

“And we will make technology that puts people first and expands access to the benefits of technology,” she added.

The tech giant reportedly uses post-consumer recycled (PCR) plastic in its portfolio of Nest thermostats, with the new pledge set to boost its use of the material, as well as recycled metals.

Apple
In the “Environmental Responsibility Report”, Apple has also set an ambitious goal to “make products without taking from the Earth” and vowed to adopt “big steps” to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from its business operations. Pixabay

“In 2018, we began publishing our product environmental reports, which help everyone understand exactly what our products are made of, how they’re built and how they get shipped to you,” Meegan noted.

According to the company, from 2017 to 2018, its carbon emissions for product shipments decreased by 40 per cent.

Also Read: Apple Planning to Reintroduce Face ID, in-display Touch ID in its iPhones in 2021

It also launched its “Power Project” which aims to bring one million energy and money-saving Nest thermostats to families in need by 2023 and built much of our Nest product portfolio with post-consumer recycled plastic. (IANS)