Saturday February 16, 2019
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Rising BMI levels: Are we the fatter generation?

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London: A new study in the country revealed a significantly greater increase in the Body Mass Index (BMI) in those who already have the highest BMIs. This disturbing fact is found  to be rising across both sexes and within all social groups.

However, when the researchers looked at the figures for those participants in the top and bottom of the study they found that there were marked differences, with much greater increases at the top end of BMI values.

“The results confirm that the median – that is the average figure for the BMI isn’t increasing much, but there are big increases at the top end of the scale – for men, women and each level of social class – which aren’t being accounted for,” said Mark Green, lecturer Health Geography at the University of Liverpool in Britain.

Researchers analysed data from the Health Survey for England, an annual health survey that captures health information including height and weight measurements for adults aged over 20 and examined trends in BMI distribution over a period of 21 years.

The data, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, was evaluated in a more detailed way to see if there were any trends in peoples’ BMI according to their sex and social group by looking at the respondents’ education level.

BMI is a widely used method for assessing a person’s weight and is calculated by dividing a person’s weight by their height. Currently, 66 percent of men and 57 percent of women are classified as overweight or obese. (IANS)

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Know How Higher Intake of Sodium Can Treat Lightheadedness

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

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"Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms," Juraschek said. Pixabay

Higher sodium intake should not be used as a treatment for lightheadedness, say researchers challenging current guidelines for sodium consumption.

Lightheadedness while standing, known as postural lightheadedness, results from gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults.

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, actually increases dizziness.

“Our study has clinical and research implications,” said Stephen Juraschek, researcher from BIDMC in Boston.

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Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions. Pixabay

“Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness,” Juraschek said.

For the study, reported in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the team used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomised crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on participants’ blood pressure for four weeks.

While the trial showed that lower sodium led to decrease in blood pressure, it also suggested that concerns about lower level of sodium causing dizziness may not be scientifically correct.

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The study also questioned recommendations to use sodium to treat lightheadedness, an intervention that could have negative effects on cardiovascular health.

“Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms,” Juraschek said.

“Clinicians should check on symptoms after initiation and even question the utility of this approach. More importantly, research is needed to understand the effects of sodium on physical function, particularly in older adults.” (IANS)