Wednesday June 19, 2019

Risk Of Heart Disease May Increase Due To Pregnancy: Study

The researchers suggested quitting smoking, doing more exercises, a healthy diet, and controlling weight to improve future health.

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Pregnancy, Breast Cancer
High blood pressure, which had long been defined as a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, dropped to 130 over 80 under guidelines adopted in 2017.

Women who have given birth have a higher chance of developing heart disease and strokes than those who are childless, a new study says.

Previous studies have shown that women usually show changes in vascular properties, blood volume and heart rates during pregnancy. However, the impact of pregnancy on subsequent heart disease has been debated.

In the new study, a team from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China, reviewed 10 studies. It involved nearly three million women worldwide, with more than 150,000 diagnosed with heart disease or strokes during the following six to 52 years.

The findings, published in the European Society of Cardiology journal, showed that giving birth has a 14 per cent higher risk of heart disease and strokes.

heart-rate, inflammation
Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases (IANS)

In addition, there was a significant association between the number of pregnancies and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Women had a four per cent increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease each time they gave birth, regardless of weight, diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking and income.

Each delivery increased the risk of coronary heart disease by five per cent and strokes by three per cent, the researchers said.

mothers
Teenaged mothers at high risk for heart diseases later(Pixabay)

According to Wang Dongming, lead researcher from the varsity, pregnancy could cause inflammation within the body and accumulation of fat tissue around the abdomen, in the blood and arteries.

Also Read: Weight Lifting Proven Better Than Walking And Cycling To Keep Heart Diseases At Bay

These changes may have a permanent impact on the cardiovascular system, leading to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

However, he said women could do a lot to prevent cardiovascular disease.

The researchers suggested quitting smoking, doing more exercises, a healthy diet, and controlling weight to improve future health. (IANS)

Next Story

HIV Patients at Higher Risk of Developing Heart Diseases

The researchers emphasised on the importance of a healthy lifestyle that includes smoking cessation, adequate physical activity, eliminating or reducing the amount of alcohol consumed and a healthy diet

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AIDS, Indonesia, HIV
Students with their faces painted with messages pose during an HIV/AIDS awareness campaign to mark the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial, in Chandigarh, India, May 20, 2018. (VOA)

HIV patients are at a significantly higher risk of suffering from heart and blood vessel diseases as compared to those without the infection, according to a new scientific statement.

In the statement, published in the Circulation journal, the researchers indicated that the heart disease risk among HIV patients occurs due to interactions between traditional risk factors, such as diet, lifestyle and tobacco use; and HIV-specific risk factors, such as a chronically activated immune system and inflammation characteristic of chronic HIV.

“Considerable gaps exist in our knowledge about HIV-associated diseases of the heart and blood vessels, in part because HIV’s transition from a fatal disease to a chronic condition is relatively recent, so long-term data on heart disease risks are limited,” said Matthew J. Feinstein, lead author and Assistant Professor at Northwestern University in Chicago.

The statement, released by American Heart Association, highlighted that tobacco use, which increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, is common among people living with HIV.

Forty-two per cent of HIV patients were smokers, it said.

HIV. Pakistan
Participants hold placards in the shape of the red ribbon, the universal symbol of awareness and support for those living with HIV, as a hot air balloon is released during an awareness campaign ahead of World AIDS Day in Kolkata, India. VOA

The researchers said that another risk factor is the aging population of HIV patients as 75 per cent of HIV patients are over 45 years of age.

“Aging with HIV differs greatly from the aging issues facing the general population,” said Jules Levin, Founder and Executive Director of the National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project.

“On average, people living with HIV who are over 60 years old have 3-7 medical conditions, including heart attacks, strokes, heart failure, kidney disease, frailty and bone diseases and many take 12-15 medications daily,” Levin added.

The researchers insisted that more research is needed for informed decision-making and effective CVD prevention and treatment in the aging population of people living with HIV.

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“There is a dearth of large-scale clinical trial data on how to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases in people living with HIV,” said Feinstein.

The researchers emphasised on the importance of a healthy lifestyle that includes smoking cessation, adequate physical activity, eliminating or reducing the amount of alcohol consumed and a healthy diet. (IANS)