Wednesday April 1, 2020

Risk Of Heart Disease May Increase Due To Pregnancy: Study

The researchers suggested quitting smoking, doing more exercises, a healthy diet, and controlling weight to improve future health.

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Pregnancy, Breast Cancer
High blood pressure, which had long been defined as a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, dropped to 130 over 80 under guidelines adopted in 2017.

Women who have given birth have a higher chance of developing heart disease and strokes than those who are childless, a new study says.

Previous studies have shown that women usually show changes in vascular properties, blood volume and heart rates during pregnancy. However, the impact of pregnancy on subsequent heart disease has been debated.

In the new study, a team from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China, reviewed 10 studies. It involved nearly three million women worldwide, with more than 150,000 diagnosed with heart disease or strokes during the following six to 52 years.

The findings, published in the European Society of Cardiology journal, showed that giving birth has a 14 per cent higher risk of heart disease and strokes.

heart-rate, inflammation
Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases (IANS)

In addition, there was a significant association between the number of pregnancies and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Women had a four per cent increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease each time they gave birth, regardless of weight, diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking and income.

Each delivery increased the risk of coronary heart disease by five per cent and strokes by three per cent, the researchers said.

mothers
Teenaged mothers at high risk for heart diseases later(Pixabay)

According to Wang Dongming, lead researcher from the varsity, pregnancy could cause inflammation within the body and accumulation of fat tissue around the abdomen, in the blood and arteries.

Also Read: Weight Lifting Proven Better Than Walking And Cycling To Keep Heart Diseases At Bay

These changes may have a permanent impact on the cardiovascular system, leading to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

However, he said women could do a lot to prevent cardiovascular disease.

The researchers suggested quitting smoking, doing more exercises, a healthy diet, and controlling weight to improve future health. (IANS)

Next Story

This AI Model may Predict Heart Diseases

AI may predict long-term risks of heart attack, cardiac death

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Heart attack
Researchers have found that Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict heart attacks and cardiac deaths. Pixabay

Researchers have found that machine learning, patterns and inferences computers use to learn to perform tasks, can predict the long-term risk of heart attack and cardiac death.

According to the study, published in the journal Cardiovascular Research, machine learning appears to be better at predicting heart attacks and cardiac deaths than the standard clinical risk assessment used by cardiologists.

“Our study showed that machine learning integration of clinical risk factors and imaging measures can accurately personalise the patient’s risk of suffering an adverse event such as heart attack or cardiac death,” said the study researchers from the Biomedical Imaging Research Institute in US

For the findings, the research team studied subjects from the imaging arm of a prospective, randomised research trial, who underwent coronary artery calcium scoring with available cardiac CT scans and long-term follow-up.

Participants here were asymptomatic, middle-aged subjects, with cardiovascular risk factors, but no known coronary artery disease.

Researchers used machine learning to assess the risk of myocardial infarction and cardiac death in the subjects, and then compared the predictions with the actual experiences of the subjects over fifteen years.

Heart Health
Diet, exercise and marital status are some of the factors that can affect the heart health. Pixabay

Subjects here answered a questionnaire to identify cardiovascular risk factors and to describe their diets, exercise and marital status. The final study consisted of 1,912 subjects, fifteen years after they were first studied.

76 subjects presented an event of myocardial infarction and/or cardiac death during this follow-up time. The subjects’ predicted machine learning scores aligned accurately with the actual distribution of observed events.

The atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk score, the standard clinical risk assessment used by cardiologists, overestimated the risk of events in the higher risk categories. Machine learning did not.

In unadjusted analysis, high predicted machine learning risk was significantly associated with a higher risk of a cardiac event.

Also Read- Find out Why Pregnant Women Shouldn’t Binge-Eat After 7 PM

“While machine learning models are sometimes regarded as “black boxes”, we have also tried to demystify machine learning; in this manuscript, we describe individual predictions for two patients as examples,” said researchers

“When applied after the scan, such individualised predictions can help guide recommendations for the patient, to decrease their risk of suffering an adverse cardiac event,” they added. (IANS)