Monday September 23, 2019

Risk Of Heart Disease May Increase Due To Pregnancy: Study

The researchers suggested quitting smoking, doing more exercises, a healthy diet, and controlling weight to improve future health.

0
//
Pregnancy, Breast Cancer
High blood pressure, which had long been defined as a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, dropped to 130 over 80 under guidelines adopted in 2017.

Women who have given birth have a higher chance of developing heart disease and strokes than those who are childless, a new study says.

Previous studies have shown that women usually show changes in vascular properties, blood volume and heart rates during pregnancy. However, the impact of pregnancy on subsequent heart disease has been debated.

In the new study, a team from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China, reviewed 10 studies. It involved nearly three million women worldwide, with more than 150,000 diagnosed with heart disease or strokes during the following six to 52 years.

The findings, published in the European Society of Cardiology journal, showed that giving birth has a 14 per cent higher risk of heart disease and strokes.

heart-rate, inflammation
Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases (IANS)

In addition, there was a significant association between the number of pregnancies and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Women had a four per cent increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease each time they gave birth, regardless of weight, diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking and income.

Each delivery increased the risk of coronary heart disease by five per cent and strokes by three per cent, the researchers said.

mothers
Teenaged mothers at high risk for heart diseases later(Pixabay)

According to Wang Dongming, lead researcher from the varsity, pregnancy could cause inflammation within the body and accumulation of fat tissue around the abdomen, in the blood and arteries.

Also Read: Weight Lifting Proven Better Than Walking And Cycling To Keep Heart Diseases At Bay

These changes may have a permanent impact on the cardiovascular system, leading to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

However, he said women could do a lot to prevent cardiovascular disease.

The researchers suggested quitting smoking, doing more exercises, a healthy diet, and controlling weight to improve future health. (IANS)

Next Story

Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

0
obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

obesity
Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

Also Read: Google Fit Can Now Track Users’ Sleep Patterns

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)