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Saankhya Lab Meghdoot to digitalise India

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New Delhi: Saankhya, a Bengaluru-based startup is on the verge of giving wings to the Modi government’s ‘Digital India’ project by developing a highly sophisticated chip called ‘Pruthvi’. Realising that the highly ambitious project can be a reality only if the country’s rural is brought under the internet coverage, Saankhya focused on using the wasted spectrum bandwidth of Television to beam internet signals.

Pruthvi, the postage stamp-sized chip has the potential to charge a system which can utilize the TV’s wasted spectrum bandwidth and emit internet signals. Once the system is in place, India can graduate into an internet hub in no time.

However, Google with its Project Loon had tried to envelope remote areas with internet using giant balloons.  Facebook too with its Aquila is bringing remote areas under internet network.

But Saankhya can beat the likes of Google and Facebook if their endeavor tastes success.

With TV population in India rising to 89 per cent, the Pruthvi-chip powered system, Meghdoot, can utilize the available bandwidth for providing wireless broadband service to remote, rural areas.

TV bandwidth communication system boasts of a reach as far as 10-30kms from a single station.

The company is planning to conduct feasibility trials in the US, the Philippines, Singapore and other countries.

The Meghdoot product consists of two things, a base station and a user-side modem that makes use of the TV White Space spectrum from 400 to 800MHz in order to provide Wireless Rural Broadband.

Founded by Parag Naik, Hemant Mallapur and Vishwakumara Kayargadde, Saankhya Labs, was founded in 2007 and is all set to conduct trials across the country.

They have inked deals with like IIT-Hyderabad, IIT-Delhi and IIT-Bombay for pilot run of the project. In a bid to digitalise India, discussions are underway with technology giant, Microsoft, to carry out field trials at Srikakulam in Andhra Pradesh.

(Picture Courtesy: www.medialabs.in)

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Future Cyber Attacks May Be Seen As The New ‘Normal’

In Sweden, for example, 82 percent of those aged 50 or older feared a cyberattack on infrastructure, compared with 53 percent of those aged 18 to 29.

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Cyberattacks
Stijn Vanveerdeghem, left, an engineer with Cisco, shows graphics with live wireless traffic to FedEx employee Barry Poole during the RSA Conference in San Francisco. VOA

Cyberattacks on elections, public infrastructure and national security are increasingly being seen as the new normal, according to a global survey on cybersecurity.

And in some of the world’s largest economies, people think their governments are not prepared.

The survey of more than 27,000 people across 26 countries conducted by the Pew Research Center found less than half of the respondents, 47 percent, believed their countries are ready to handle a major cyber incident.

A median of 74 percent thought it was likely national security information would be accessed. Sixty-nine percent said they expected public infrastructure to be damaged. And 61 percent expected cyberattacks targeting their country’s elections.

Israel and Russia ranked as among the most confident populations, with more than two-thirds of survey-takers in those countries saying their governments are prepared for a major cyber incident.

Cloudhopper, cyberattacks, internet
The picture shows a warning sign for “cyber threats ahead”.

The three sub-Saharan African countries in the survey — Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa — were generally optimistic, with more than half of those polled saying their nations were prepared for a cyber incident.

Brazil and Argentina were the least confident, with just nine percent of Argentineans responding their government was prepared.

In key economies such as Germany and Japan, more than half of the respondents expressed concern they were ill-prepared to deal with cyberattacks.

United States

The Pew survey found expectations for cyberattacks ran highest in the United States, where there have been more than 100 major cyber incidents since 2006.

Almost 80 percent of U.S. respondents expected damage to public infrastructure, breaches of national security information and elections tampering.

But while more Americans than not say the country is prepared for cyberattacks, 53 percent to 43 percent, feelings on cyber preparedness changed depending on political affiliation.

More than 60 percent of Republicans thought the United States is prepared for cyberattacks as opposed to 47 percent of Democrats.

Cyberattacks
An employee works near screens in the virus lab at the headquarters of Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Labs in Moscow, July 29, 2013. VOA

Politics, age

The Pew survey detected similar trends in many of the other countries in the survey.

In Russia, for example, about 75 percent of those who support President Vladimir Putin are optimistic about handling a cyberattack, compared to 61 percent of non-Putin supporters.

The level of concern about cyberattacks also varied according to age.

In many of the Western countries surveyed, Pew found older people were likely to be more concerned than younger people.

In Sweden, for example, 82 percent of those aged 50 or older feared a cyberattack on infrastructure, compared with 53 percent of those aged 18 to 29.

Also Read: Huawei Set to Invest $2 bn on Cybersecurity Over The Next Five Years

The Pew survey was conducted in-person or via telephone between May 14 and August 12, 2018.

The 26 countries surveyed are: United States, Canada, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Britain, Russia, Australia, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, South Korea, Israel, Tunisia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. (VOA)