Monday March 19, 2018
Home India Sanjoy Roy ma...

Sanjoy Roy makes eforts to exhibit Indian contemporary dance

Image source:

The arts have become an addiction for Sanjoy Roy, the managing director of Teamwork Arts, which produces several well-reputed cultural programmes through the year. His latest one is Expressions, an international contemporary dance festival that showcases several modern forms from India and the world, allowing an atmosphere of alliance and association between different cultures.

A composite synthesis of different concepts, the performances capsules titled Studies for C, The Mystical Forest, Walking, Amaara-A Journey of Love, Dhrut and Antatah: The 13th Day, bring a new story alive. “If The Mystical Forest explores life within the forest, Amaara, A Journey of Love is a piece that takes the audience into a world of experiencing the body and the mind as they fuse their way into nothingness,” says Roy, who feels the presentations evoke thought that compels us to enquire further.

stills from various dance presentations


In partnership with Ministry of Culture, Indian Council for  Cultural Relations, British Council and Pro Helvetia, the event has been organised to not only give different expressions a platform, but to also reiterate that, while classical traditions are important, contemporary ones should also be given an equal footing. “India has moved on. People want to explore different art forms. The plethora of talent is staggering, and with the growing interest in contemporary arts I see, I feel reassured that the future holds pleasant opportunities,” he says.

Roy has seen a lot of things change in his times. Back in the 70s and 80s, when he had joined theatre, few considered it a real career. “Even my father-in-law couldn’t fathom I did theatre as a full-time job. Even though the arts are still a story of struggle, they’ve moved from being something to be embarrassed about to something to boast about,” he says, adding, “Dance has become part of the local idiom. Even the Indian diaspora that was once only interested in learning one or the other form of classical dance or music, is now swiftly opening up to other modern forms.”

So strong is the wave of change that Roy is getting Ernst and Young, an advisory and business consulting firm, to conduct a study on the creative industry. He feels that it positively impacts the economy in a big way, how many jobs it creates, trade practices, infrastructure requirements and other aspects of theatre, dance and art. “The research has been on for a year now and the results will put things in perspective, highlighting the importance of the arts. In May 2016, you should be able to read it for yourself,” he says.

Credits: newindianexpress

Next Story

Pentavalent vaccine: Doctors raise red flag

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive

the new Hepatitis B vaccine for adults is called Heplisav-B.
India's PV to be reexamined because of its harmful effects. .
  • Pentavalent vaccine was introduced in India six years ago
  • It is since then have been a cause of many deaths
  • Doctors want it to be reexamined before continuing its use

Pentavalent vaccine (PV), that was introduced by India a little over six years ago, doubled the deaths of children soon after vaccination compared to the DPT (Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus) vaccine, according to a new study that calls for a “rigorous review of the deaths following vaccination with PV”.

Health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine. Wikimedia Commons
PV has been cause of many deaths in past years. Wikimedia Commons

Government records show that there were 10,612 deaths following vaccination (both PV and DPT) in the last 10 years. There was a huge increase in these numbers in 2017, which the Health Ministry has promised to study. “The present analysis could be a starting point in the quest to reduce the numbers of such deaths,” authors of the new study say.

The study by Dr Jacob Puliyel, Head of Pediatrics at St Stephens Hospital, and Dr V. Sreenivas, Professor of Biostatistics at the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), both in New Delhi, is published in the peer-reviewed Medical Journal of Dr D.Y. Patil University.

PV is a combination of the DPT vaccine and two more vaccines against Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) and hepatitis B. Starting December 2011, PV was introduced into India’s immunisation programme to replace DPT vaccine in a staged manner with a view to adding protection against Hib and Hepatitis B without increasing the number of injections given to infants.

Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons
Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons

But sporadic reports of unexplained deaths following immunisation with PV had been a matter of concern. Puliyel, Sreenivas and their colleagues undertook the study to find out if these deaths were merely coincidental or vaccine-induced.

The authors obtained data of all deaths reported from April 2012 to May 2016 under the Right to Information Act. Data on deaths within 72 hours of administering DPT and PV from different states were used.

For their study, the authors assumed that all deaths within 72 hours of receiving DPT are natural deaths. Using this figure as the baseline, they presumed that any increase in the number of deaths above this baseline among children receiving PV must be caused by this vaccine.

Also Read: With Medicine Running Out, Venezuelans With Transplant Live in Fear

According to their analysis of the data provided by the government, there were 237 deaths within 72 hours of administering the Pentavalent vaccine — twice the death rate among infants who received DPT vaccine.

Extrapolating the data, the authors have estimated that vaccination of 26 million children each year in India would result in 122 additional deaths within 72 hours, due to the switch from DPT to PV.

“There is likely to be 7,020 to 8,190 deaths from PV each year if data from states with the better reporting, namely Manipur and Chandigarh, are projected nationwide,” their report says.

It is important to make sure that these vaccines are reexamined peroperly. VOA

The authors note that while the study looks at the short-term increase in deaths (within three days of vaccination) it does not calculate the potential benefits of PV on infant mortality, for example by protection against lethal diseases like Haemophilus influenza.

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive. “These findings of differential death rates between DPT and PV do call for further rigorous prospective population-based investigations,” the study concludes. IANS