Thursday March 21, 2019
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Sanskrit Award bestowed on Thai princess

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New Delhi: Thai Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn was called by Vice-president Hamid Ansari on Friday to present the first world Sanskrit Award of India. India has decided to bestow the first world Sanskrit Award of India on her.

“Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn will be travelling to India to receive the first world Sanskrit Award which has been granted on her by the government of India,” said Wadhwa, who was accompanying Ansari during his visit to Thailand.

Before leaving for home, Ansari called on Princess Sirindhorn at the Sra Pathum Palace this morning and inspected the Chitralada Project inside it.

Hers will be among the several visits by top Thai leaders expected this year including Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha, Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn and Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister Prawit Wongsuwon.

“There is an invitation to the Prime Minster of Thailand to visit us this year. We have also extended an invitation to Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn to visit India at mutually convenient dates and he will be hosted by Vice President,” Wadhwa said.

“We also look forward to the visit of deputy prime minister and defence minister to India at the invitation of our Defence Minister. So that is the fourth visit that we expect…” he added.

Over 600 Sanskrit scholars from 60 countries participated in the five-day conference last year which was inaugurated by External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj.

Wadhwa also lauded Thailand for successfully hosting the 16th World Sanskrit Conference.(inputs from agencies)(image courtesy: rmaf.org.ph)

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

water
Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)