Wednesday November 22, 2017
Home Uncategorized Sanskrit Shik...

Sanskrit Shiksha Sangh draws CBSE to court following private schools’ inability to follow Sanskrit as third language

0
119

sanskrit-large

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Sanskrit Shiksha Sangh (SSS) recently gave a legal notice to Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), for being unable to make the private schools affiliated by it. The association will approach the High Court, in case of an improper response or action from the board.

SSS general secretary V Dayalu told ET, “It has been six months since the KVs stopped teaching German as the third language subject.”

“But students in many private schools continue to learn Spanish, French, German as the third language in classes VI, VII and VIII. The government cannot have a different approach for KVs and a different one for private schools,” Dayalu added.

The three-language formula included in the national education policy states that secondary stage students should also learn a modern Indian language apart from English and Hindi.

As per ET’s report, in 2013, the SSS had moved the Delhi High Court alleging that the Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan’s decision to introduce German as a third language in place of Sanskrit was against this formula. This eventually caused the government to drop German as the third language in Kendriya Vidyalayas.

Monica Arora, representative of Supreme Court lawyers of SSS told ET, “This isn’t a battle between foreign languages and Sanskrit. We are okay with schools offering any modern Indian language as the third language subject. We just want CBSE to follow what it had stated in its affidavit in the high court. They should either follow the law or have it changed”.

Next Story

French Education Ministry selects 79 Indian students for English Language Assistants program

0
143
French Education Ministry's English Language Assistants programme
French Education Ministry's English Language Assistants programme that will see participation of 60 countries. VOA
  • French Education Ministry’s English Language Assistants program will see participation of 60 countries
  • The program will start in October 2017 and end in May 2018, according to a statement from the French Embassy and the Institut Français India (IFI)
  • The 79 students have been selected on the basis of their expertise in both French and English

New Delhi, June 18, 2017: A total of 79 Indian students have been selected for the French Education Ministry’s English Language Assistants programme that will see participation of 60 countries.

The programme will start in October 2017 and end in May 2018, according to a statement from the French Embassy and the Institute Français India (IFI) here on Thursday.

“In the framework of their bilateral cooperation in education, France and India have agreed to support the mobility of students, encouraging the internationalisation of their higher education training courses,” it said.

Students taking part in this 20-year-old teaching programme will be assisting English language teachers in primary, secondary and higher secondary schools by offering them an understanding of the language throughout the whole academic year.

ALSO READ: Politics and Education: A Relationship that contributes a lot in shaping our Future

The 79 students have been selected on the basis of their expertise in both French and English.

“The programme provides a unique opportunity to Indian students who have already acquired a high level of French language competence and to have a first professional experience in the French academic milieu,” IFI Attache for Cooperation in Education Marie Doublier told IANS.

“They shall not only work in French schools but also live with French families to get a complete familiarity of the French lifestyle. They will also help develop links between French and Indian schools, teachers and students,” she said.

She added that most participants become French language teachers in Indian schools, colleges and universities when they return. (IANS)

 

Next Story

Quinona: Sacred “mother grain” of Ancient Inca Civilization may be the Grain of Future

Plant scientist Mark Tester of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia said the research pinpointed a gene that guides production of saponins in quinoa

0
188
FILE - A man holds quinoa grains at a marketplace for small- and medium-sized quinoa growers in Challapata, Oruro Department, south of La Paz, Bolivia, April 19, 2014. VOA

Feb 12, 2017: Quinoa, the sacred “mother grain” of the ancient Inca civilization suppressed by Spanish conquistadors, could become an increasingly important food source in the future thanks to genetic secrets revealed in a new study.

Scientists on Wednesday said they have mapped the genome of quinoa and identified a gene that could be manipulated to get rid of the grain’s natural bitter taste and pave the way for more widespread commercial use.

Quinoa already grows well in harsh conditions such as salty and low-quality soil, high elevations and cool temperatures, meaning it can flourish in locales where common cereal crops like wheat and rice may struggle. But the presence of toxic and bitter chemicals called saponins in its seeds has been one of the impediments to extensive cultivation.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Plant scientist Mark Tester of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia said the research pinpointed a gene that guides production of saponins in quinoa.

FILE – Aymara indigenous women grind grains of quinoa in Oruro, Bolivia, in 2013. VOA

This knowledge could enable breeding of quinoa without saponins, to make the seeds sweeter.

Currently, quinoa grain must be processed through washing and drying after harvest to remove saponins.

“Quinoa is currently greatly under-utilized,” said Tester, who led the research published in the journal Nature. “It is highly nutritious, with a high protein content that, importantly, has a very good balance of amino acids, which is unusual for our major grains. It is gluten free and high in vitamins and minerals, too.”

Increased quinoa production could improve food security on a planet with unrelenting human population growth, Tester said.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

There are potential disadvantages to reducing saponins, perhaps increasing susceptibility to fungal infections or bird predation, Tester added.

Quinoa, which boasts a nutty flavor, can be used the same ways as rice and wheat. It can be cooked and served on its own, turned into pasta, put in soups, eaten as a cereal or fermented to make beer or chicha, a beverage of the Andes.

The crop was sacred to the ancient Incas, who called it “chisoya mama,” or the “mother grain.”

During their South American conquest 500 years ago, Spaniards suppressed quinoa cultivation because of its use in indigenous religious ceremonies. They forbade quinoa cultivation for a time, with the Incas forced to grow wheat instead.

Quinoa is still a minor crop globally, grown mostly in Peru and Bolivia. It has become fashionable in the West in recent years, primarily as a health food. (VOA)

Next Story

“No school bags till class II,” says Minister of State for HRD Upendra Kushwaha

Both NCERT and CBSE have taken several measures to reduce curriculum load and the weight of school bags

0
74
Representational image. Pixabay

New Delhi, November 22, 2016: The CBSE has directed schools affiliated to it to ensure that students do not carry school bags till class II and also to restrict the number of books to be prescribed in classes I-VIII, Minister of State for Human Resource Development Upendra Kushwaha told the Lok Sabha on Monday.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

In a written reply to a question, he said both the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) and the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) have taken several measures to reduce curriculum load and the weight of school bags.

“In its latest circular dated September 12, 2016, it has advised schools to take all possible measures to keep the weight of school bag under control,” said the Minister.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues

He said that the NCERT has not recommended any textbook for early childhood education, while only two books for classes I & II and three books for classes III to V have been recommended.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

“The Government has also launched a platform for showcasing and dissemination of all digital and digitisable resources for its stakeholders in collaboration with the NCERT,” said the Minister, adding that the NCERT has made available all their textbooks and other teaching-learning material for free access on its website. (IANS)