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SC restrains Tamil Nadu Government from conducting its Traditional Bull-taming sport ‘Jallikattu’

The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change had sent a draft on June 15, seeking to change section 22 of the Act by adding a new sub-section

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Bull-taming. Image Source: Youtube
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  • SC had restrained the Tamil Nadu government from conducting its traditional bull-taming sport ‘Jallikattu’
  • The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change has sent draft on June 15
  • Once Cabinet passes it, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (amendment) Bill, 2016 will be brought to Parliament in the monsoon session

After the Supreme Court restrained the Tamil Nadu government from conducting its traditional bull-taming sport Jallikattu, and stayed the Centre’s notification lifting the ban on it, the Law and Justice Ministry has given its approval to a draft amendment to the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960, which will allow the use of animals in traditional cultural practices.

“What is the necessity of such festivals… like Jallikattu? There was no festival for four years… as an interim measure, we direct that there shall be stay of notification dated January 7, 2016, issued by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, until further orders,” a bench of Justices Dipak Misra and N V Ramana stated in January.

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The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change had sent the draft on June 15, seeking to change section 22 of the Act by adding a new sub-section.

Bull-Taming. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

“Any animal notified in the official gazette, in exercise of the powers conferred under sub-section (II) of section 22 of the Act shall continue to be exhibited or trained as a performing animal, at events, in a manner prescribed the religion of any community, or practiced traditionally under the customs or as a part of the culture, in any part of the country. These events may, inter-alia, include Jallikattu in Tamil Nadu, and bullock cart races in Maharashtra, Karnataka, Punjab, Haryana, Kerala, Gujarat, etc,” reads the draft amendment, reports Scroll.in.

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Once Cabinet passes it, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (amendment) Bill, 2016 will be brought to Parliament in the monsoon session, which starts on July 18, reported The New Indian Express.

-This report is modified by Ajay Krishna, a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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  • Aparna Gupta

    It is good to retain your tradition but not by bothering any animal and also it will hinder Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960

  • AJ Krish

    If necessary precautions are taken while the traditional bull-fighting takes place, nothing should stop the government from conducting it.

Next Story

A Study of Africa’s Bush Elephants

African elephants are known to love bathing, spraying and mud-wallowing.

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African bush elephants
Orphaned baby elephants are seen after being bottle-fed, at the David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage near Nairobi, Kenya. VOA

A study of the African bush elephant’s vast network of deep wrinkles has found it is intricately designed to help the elephants keep their cool, fight off parasites and defend against sun damage, scientists said on Tuesday.

The fine pattern of millions of channels means the elephant’s skin can retain five to 10 times more water than a flat surface, the scientists said.

The research, conducted by scientists at Switzerland’s University of Geneva and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, was published in the journal Nature Communications on Tuesday.

African bush elephants
San Diego Zoo, October. Flickr

“Because of their huge body size, and their warm and dry habitat, African elephants can avoid over-heating only by losing calories through evaporation of the water they collect in and on their skin,” researchers wrote.

The scientists found that elephant skin channels are not just folds or wrinkles, but actual fractures in the animal’s brittle outermost layer of skin. The skin grows on a tiny lattice framework, they said, causing it to fracture under mechanical stress when the animals move.

Also Read: Wildlife At Risk Due to Mass Tourism: Biologits

African elephants are known to love bathing, spraying and mud-wallowing, and since they have no sweat and sebum glands to keep their skin moist and supple, the tiny crevices trap and hold on to water and mud, helping to regulate body temperature.

They also form a barrier against bugs and solar radiation. (VOA)