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Scientists discover a Fossil Relic of early Milky Way harboring stars of hugely different ages

These similarities could make Terzan 5 a fossilised relic of galaxy formation, representing one of the earliest building blocks of the Milky Way

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Milky Way Galaxy. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons.

LONDON, Sept 08, 2016: An international team of researchers has found that a stellar system classified as a globular cluster for the 40-odd years since its detection actually has properties uncommon for a globular cluster that make it the ideal candidate for a living fossil from the early days of the Milky Way.

The cluster, known as Terzan 5 — 19,000 light-years from Earth- harbours stars of hugely different ages — an age-gap of roughly seven billion years and bridges the gap in understanding between our galaxy’s past and its present, the study said.

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“Such galactic fossils allow astronomers to reconstruct an important piece of the history of our Milky Way,” explained lead author of the study Francesco Ferraro from University of Bologna in Italy.

While the properties of Terzan 5 are uncommon for a globular cluster, they are very similar to the stellar population which can be found in the galactic bulge, the tightly packed central region of the Milky Way.

These similarities could make Terzan 5 a fossilised relic of galaxy formation, representing one of the earliest building blocks of the Milky Way.

“Terzan 5 could represent an intriguing link between the local and the distant Universe, a surviving witness of the Galactic bulge assembly process,” Ferraro said.

The team scoured data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on board Hubble, as well as from a suite of other ground-based telescopes.

They found compelling evidence that there are two distinct kinds of stars in Terzan 5 which not only differ in the elements they contain, but have an age-gap of roughly seven billion years.

The ages of the two populations indicate that the star formation process in Terzan 5 was not continuous, but was dominated by two distinct bursts of star formation.

“This requires the Terzan 5 ancestor to have large amounts of gas for a second generation of stars and to be quite massive. At least 100 million times the mass of the Sun,” co-author of the study Davide Massari from National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) , Italy.

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Its unusual properties make Terzan 5 the ideal candidate for a living fossil from the early days of the Milky Way, said the study published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Somehow Terzan 5 has managed to survive being disrupted for billions of years, and has been preserved as a remnant of the distant past of the Milky Way.

The researchers believe that this discovery paves the way for a better and more complete understanding of galaxy assembly. (IANS)

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Fossil Gen 5: Will keep Wear OS Enthusiasts Happy (Tech Review)

Conclusion: The Fossil Gen 5 offers a dependable proposition, which has ample versatility. Also, one can easily swap the straps for customising it further. The smartwatch is meant to keep both Wear OS fans and fitness enthusiasts happy

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Fossil Gen 5 sports a Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 3,100 chip, which, as promised, helps the device with battery life. (Representational image). Pixabay

BY KRISHNA SINHACHAUDHURY 

When you think of Google’s Wear OS, not many names of smartwatches may strike you immediately. But keen observers may recall Misfit and some others might name Fossil.

The Texas-headquartered Fossil is one of the few brands that have remained loyal to Google’s Wear OS (previously known as Android Wear). The company refreshes its smartwatch line-up each year minus the fanfare that a Samsung smartwatch enjoys.

Incidentally, Samsung’s new watches and hearables (both self-branded as well as JBL-branded) captured 9.8 per cent share of the global wearable market, according to International Data Corporation (IDC).

Powered by Wear OS, Fossil has now introduced the Gen 5 Smartwatch in the growing India wearable market for Rs 22,995 that promises extended battery mode and has a swim proof speaker.

Here’s how the smartwatch fared in real life.

Those familiar with Fossil smartwatches will feel at home with the Gen 5. We reviewed the “Carlyle” style Gen 5 which has a typical masculine approach.

It sports a chunky 1.28-inch AMOLED screen with a pixel density of 328ppi (pixel per inch) and three pushers on the right side and the middle of which is a rotatable crown. However, the bezel doesn’t rotate like a Samsung Galaxy watch.

The display is beautiful and sharp to look at. However, the bright outdoors can make it a tad trickier to see.

Fossil watch
Those familiar with Fossil smartwatches will feel at home with the Gen 5. We reviewed the “Carlyle” style Gen 5 which has a typical masculine approach. (Representational image). Pixabay

Underneath sits the heart rate sensor that does not detect irregular heartbeat which the Apple Watch does, or what Samsung’s upcoming Tizen OS smartwatches promise.

Fossil Gen 5 sports a Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 3,100 chip, which, as promised, helps the device with battery life.

We found that the battery life was better than the average Wear OS watches out there, falling a little short of a day’s life on a single charge. However, keeping the always on display can lead to further depletion of the battery.

The company has custom modes to further help the device last longer.

The addition of a speaker was refreshing. One can use it while keeping it connected to their smartphone.

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The speaker also allows your watch to answer you when are using Google Assistant and also can take calls from the watch.

The device is also water resistant up to 3ATM.

Conclusion: The Fossil Gen 5 offers a dependable proposition, which has ample versatility. Also, one can easily swap the straps for customising it further. The smartwatch is meant to keep both Wear OS fans and fitness enthusiasts happy. (IANS)