Wednesday February 20, 2019
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Sea Turtles Suffer Majorly Due to Plastic Traps

Turtles found injured had serious wounds and barely survived after they were taken to a rehabilitation centre for treatment.

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Olive Ridley Sea Turtle, Wikimedia Commons

Thai authorities have said that in less than two months, more than 20 sea turtles had been killed from plastic or fish net wraps.

Thorn Thamrongnavaswasdi, vice dean of the fisheries faculty of Kasetsart University, said on Monday that the sea turtles washed upon the shores of Phuket and Phan-nga beaches provinces could not survive as the trapped sea animals suffocated in plastic waste bags or struggled tremendously in fishing nets, reports Xinhua news agency.

The marine scientist said that more than 20 green turtles and Olive Ridley turtles were found on Mai Khao beach in the Sirinart national park in Phuket and the beach in Thai Muang national park in Phang-nga province in the past two months.

 

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Sea Turtles,

 

He said many were found dead with plastic or pieces of fish net wrapped around the turtles’ legs or necks.

Thorn also said turtles found injured had serious wounds and barely survived after they were taken to a rehabilitation centre for treatment.

Mai Khao and Thai Muang beaches have been the spawning ground for sea turtles which come to the beaches during October-February period.

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A plastic bottle washed up by the sea . (VOA)

Thorn however said the leatherback turtles have been missing for four years now.

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In June this year on World Environment Day, the Thai Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment along with several ministries, pledged to raise public awareness against the use of plastic by launching a campaign called “Beat Plastic Pollution: If you can’t reuse it, refuse it”. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Find Synthetic Fibers The Major Contributors of Environmental Pollution

Synthetic fibres are petroleum-based products, unlike natural fibres such as wool, cotton and silk, which are recyclable and biodegradable. 

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Synthetic fibres are petroleum-based products, unlike natural fibres such as wool, cotton and silk, which are recyclable and biodegradable.  Pixabay

Polyester and other synthetic fibres like nylon are major contributors of microplastics pollution in the environment, say researchers and suggest switching to biosynthetic fibres to prevent this.

“These materials, during production, processing and after use, break down and release microfibres that can now be found in everything and everyone,” said Melik Demirel, Professor at the Pennsylvania State University in the US.

Synthetic fibres are petroleum-based products, unlike natural fibres such as wool, cotton and silk, which are recyclable and biodegradable.

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Bacteria that consume plastics do exist. However, they are currently at the academic research phase and will take some time to gain industrial momentum. Pixabay

Mixed fibres that contain both natural and synthetic fibres are difficult or costly to recycle.

In the oceans, pieces of microscopic plastic are consumed by plants and animals and enter the human food chain through harvested fish.

In the study, Demirel suggested few things to prevent this: minimising the use of synthetic fibres and switching to natural fibres such as wool, cotton, silk and linen, even though synthetic fibres are less expensive and natural fibres have other environmental costs, such as water and land-use issues; large scale use of bacteria that could aid in biodegradation of the fibres for reuse; substituting synthetic fibres with biosynthetic fibres, that are both recyclable and biodegradable; and blending synthetic fibres with natural fibres to lend them durability while also allowing the blends to be recycled.

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Polyester and other synthetic fibres like nylon are major contributors of microplastics pollution in the environment, say researchers and suggest switching to biosynthetic fibres to prevent this. Pixabay

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Bacteria that consume plastics do exist. However, they are currently at the academic research phase and will take some time to gain industrial momentum.

The study was presented at the 2019 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in the US. (IANS)