Friday September 21, 2018

Selfitis: An obsessive compulsive disorder of taking too many selfies

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) has officially deemed taking selfies as a “mental disorder”.

The APA made this classification during its annual board of directors meeting in Chicago recently. Giving the name “selfitis” to the disorder, the APA defined the disorder as a type of an obsessive compulsive disorder to take one’s own pictures and post them on social media. They also stated that this condition is a mechanism used by people to make up for their low self esteem and increase intimacy with other people.

According to the APA, there are three levels of selfitis,

  1. Borderline Selfitis: Taking selfies at least three times a day, but not posting them on the social media.
  2. Acute Selfitis: Taking selfies at least three times a day, and sharing them all on social media.
  3. Chronic Selfitis: It is defined as an uncontrollable urge to take one’s own pictures round the clock and posting them on social media platforms more than six times a day.

Recently, the term “Selfitis” also made it into the Oxford Dictionary of English according to a website.

Makati City, a city in Philippines was named the “selfie capital of the world” by Time magazine recently. This news of selfies being looked at as a mental disorder, might make things dismal for this Filipino city.

 

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New Selfie App of NASA Lets You Click Selfies in Virtual Spacesuit

The VR app will be available for Oculus and Vive through the Spitzer mission website and will soon be available through the Oculus store, NASA said

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This is NASA's Latest achievement. Pixabay

NASA has rolled out a new app that allows you to take a picture of yourself in a virtual spacesuit, posing in front of gorgeous cosmic locations, like the Orion Nebula or the centre of the Milky Way galaxy.

Along with the “NASA Selfies” app, the US space agency also launched an exoplanet excursions virtual reality (VR) app that takes VR users on a guided tour of the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system.

These digital products were created to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the launch of the Spitzer space telescope, NASA said in a statement on Wednesday.

The simple interface of the Selfies app means you just snap a photo of yourself, pick your background, and share on social media.

The app, available for both iOS and Android devices, also provides information about the science behind the images, all of which are taken by Spitzer.

The exoplanet excursions virtual reality app introduces for VR users the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system.

TRAPPIST-1 is the only known exoplanet system to host seven roughly Earth-size planets.

NASA
The app, available for both iOS and Android devices, also provides information about the science behind the images, all of which are taken by Spitzer. Pixabay

Spitzer played a major role in detecting these planets and providing information that has helped scientists learn about the planets’ likely compositions.

The TRAPPIST-1 system is too far away for telescopes to directly observe these planets, but this VR experience features artists’ impressions of what the planets might look like, NASA said.

These impressions are based on data from Spitzer and other telescopes that have studied the TRAPPIST-1 system.

Users of the app are navigated around five of the seven planets, surrounded by the blackness of space and the faint lights of distant stars.

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The VR app will be available for Oculus and Vive through the Spitzer mission website and will soon be available through the Oculus store, NASA said.

A 360-degree video is also be available on the Spitzer Youtube page that allows viewers to explore the virtual TRAPPIST-1 system on their desktop, smartphone or with a smartphone-based 360-viewer like Google Cardboard, it added.

Considered a cousin of the Hubble space telescope, the Spitzer space telescope was launched on August 25, 2003, to study the early universe in infrared light. (IANS)

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