Monday January 22, 2018
Home India Seven Bengalu...

Seven Bengaluru students scale Africa’s Mount Kilimanjaro

Seven teenage boys of a school recently climbed to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa (19,336 feet)

1
//
128
Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa (19,336 feet)
Republish
Reprint
  • Seven teenage boys of a school here recently climbed to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa (19,336 feet)
  •  The seven adventurous students, from classes 9 and 10 of the Indus International School are Siddharth Singh, Tarush Harris, Mihir Kansal, Aryaman Verma, Jasmeher Singh, Rahul Rao and William Joseph
  • The expedition team spent the first night in a hut in a rain forest, followed by a two-night halt at Horombu Hut in the grasslands, before ascending

Bengaluru, October 10, 2016: Seven teenage boys of a school here recently climbed to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa (19,336 feet), said the school on Sunday.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

“Our seven students had set foot on the summit on September 29 after trekking 36 km through the Kilimanjaro National Park in Tanzania during the 10-day expedition (September 24-October 3),” the statement quoted expedition in-charge Captain Mohit as saying.

The seven adventurous students, from classes 9 and 10 of the Indus International School are Siddharth Singh, Tarush Harris, Mihir Kansal, Aryaman Verma, Jasmeher Singh, Rahul Rao and William Joseph.

“The moment I had set foot on the peak, I broke down. I felt honoured and proud that life had presented me with such an opportunity,” said Harris in the statement.

Kansal, the first among them to scale the peak, said since childhood, his dream was to pursue extreme sports when he grew up.

“As my goal is to scale seven highest peaks in seven continents, this was one step towards realizing my dream. My joy knew no bounds, when I was given this opportunity,” he said.

The expedition team spent the first night in a hut in a rain forest, followed by a two-night halt at Horombu Hut in the grasslands, before ascending.

“The last lap of journey (6 km) was challenging, as we had to negotiate a steep climb to conquer the peak after a 6-7 hours struggle,” said Mohit.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

The peak is located on the rim of a dormant volcano, with a spectacular view of the crater in the centre and glaciers on the periphery.

“The expedition taught me that I am capable of overcoming pain. I became more self-reliant and independent in the process because in the wilderness, you don’t have gadgets or any tools, the environment pushes you to help yourself,” said Rao.

The school said its training institute imparts experiential leadership to its wards through outbound sessions to develop risk-taking, problem solving, resilience and self-reliance, and the Kilimanjaro expedition was one of such endeavours.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

“We believe in preparing students for life challenges. By providing them with such opportunities, we inspire and motivate them to face challenging situations and develop leadership qualities,” said school Principal Sarojini Rao in the statement. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Antara

    Hats off to those seven brave teenagers!

Next Story

Raja Chari: Indian American Astronaut chosen by NASA

Raja Chari, an American of Indian descent, has been chosen by NASA as one of the 12 astronauts for a new space mission.

1
//
163
Raja Chari. Twitter.
  • Raja Chari is an American of Indian descent chosen by NASA for the new batch of astronauts
  • Currently, he is a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force
  • Chari will have to go through two years of astronaut training which begins in August

June 06, 2017: NASA has chosen 12 astronauts out of a record-breaking 18,300 applications for upcoming space missions. An American of Indian descent, Raja Chari, has successfully earned his spot in the top 12.

The astronauts were selected on the basis of expertise, education, and physical tests. This batch of 12 astronauts is the largest group selected by NASA since two decades. The group consisting of 7 men and 5 women surpassed the minimum requirements of NASA.

Born in Waterloo, Iowa, Chari graduated from Air Force Academy in 1999 with a bachelor’s degree in Astronautical Engineering and Engineering Science. He went on to complete his master’s in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The astronaut is also a graduate of US Naval Test Pilot School.

Currently, Raja Chari is a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force. He is the commander of 461st Flight Test Squadron and director of the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

After Late Kalpana Chawla, Lt. Col. Raja Chari is the second Indian American astronaut chosen by NASA.

The 12 astronauts will have to go through two years of training. Upon completion, they will be assigned their missions ranging from research at the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft by private companies, to flying on deep space missions on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft.

The US Vice-President Mike Pence visited the Johnson Space Centre in Houston to announce and congratulate the new batch. Pence also said that President Trump is “fully committed” to NASA’s missions in space.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393