Monday September 24, 2018
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Seventy Million Children likely to die by 2030 if Nations lack Developmental Goals, warns UNICEF

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Poor Kids. Image source: gogetfunding.com
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  • UNICEF urges governments, donors and NGOs to focus on the most disadvantaged children and close the gaps 
  • The migration and refugee crisis affecting Europe is one example of how inequalities are fueling global instability
  • UNICEF is urging countries to develop national plans so they can meet the 2030 sustainable development agenda

UNICEF, UN children’s agency, had warned that about 70 million of people could die between 2016 to 2030 if there parents and government do not put in efforts to achieve their developmental goals.

In its annual State of the World’s Children report issued Tuesday, June 28, UNICEF urges governments, donors and NGOs to focus on the most disadvantaged children and close the gaps, giving all young people a better chance at a bright future.

UNICEF (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
UNICEF (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

“These vast inequities and dangers do more than violate the rights and imperil the futures of individual children,” says UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake in the report. “They perpetuate inter-generational cycles of disadvantage and inequality that undermine the stability of societies and even the security of nations everywhere,” he added.

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The migration and refugee crisis affecting Europe is one example of how inequalities are fueling global instability, said Justin Forsyth, UNICEF deputy executive director.

“A combination of poor governance, conflict, but also inequality and inequity is fueling that instability, which is fueling that mass movement of people,” he said of the migrants on the move from North Africa.

Forsyth says the situation can be improved with small investments in health and education. “We could save up to 147 million children from death from under five [years old] child mortality, just with a 2 percent increase in expenditure in 74 countries.” That translates to about $30 billion a year.

UNICEF is urging countries to develop national plans so they can meet the ambitious targets they have committed to in the 2030 sustainable development agenda.

Africa struggling

The report raises the alarm for children in sub-Saharan Africa, where two out of three live in poverty and most have had less than four years of schooling.

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Conflict, corruption, poor governance and the effects of climate change are hindering sustainable progress on the sub-continent.

Poor Children in Africa(Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Children in Africa. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“In those places like DR Congo, like South Sudan, like the Central African Republic, where a combination of conflict and poor governance has meant that they haven’t kept up with the rest of Africa, we need to continue to invest in those places,” said UNICEF Program Director Ted Chaiban.

UNICEF predicted if the developmental goals are not met, around 35 million African children will die before attaining an age of five from preventable causes and those who survive will have poor primary school attendance and 9 out of ten will live in extreme poverty. (VOA)

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  • AJ Krish

    It is not only the government but also the public who should work towards child nourishment. We see children on the roads, deprived of food,education and a house to live in.Yet we do nothing! It should start from the very bottom if these children are to be saved.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Children are the future, there should be something done to not let it happen

  • Aparna Gupta

    Children are the future of any nation. Africa must take the appropriate measures to save their future.

SHARE
  • AJ Krish

    It is not only the government but also the public who should work towards child nourishment. We see children on the roads, deprived of food,education and a house to live in.Yet we do nothing! It should start from the very bottom if these children are to be saved.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Children are the future, there should be something done to not let it happen

  • Aparna Gupta

    Children are the future of any nation. Africa must take the appropriate measures to save their future.

Next Story

Ebola Increases The Number of Orphans in DRC: UNICEF

WHO reports progress is being made in limiting the spread of the deadly virus in some areas.

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Ebola, UNICEF. congo
A boy runs past a dispenser containing water mixed with disinfectant, east of Mbandaka, DRC. VOA

The U.N. Children’s Fund (UNICEF) reports a growing number of children in eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo orphaned by the Ebola outbreak in the region are at risk of stigmatization and abandonment.

UNICEF reports a number of children have died from the disease. Others, it says, have lost one or both parents to Ebola or have been left to fend for themselves while their parents are confined in Ebola treatment centers.

UNICEF spokesman, Christophe Boulierac, says his and other aid agencies so far have identified 155 children who have been orphaned or separated from their parents with no one to care for them. He says these children are extremely vulnerable.

Ebola Congo, WHO
Photo taken Sept 9, 2018, shows health workers walking with a boy suspected of having the Ebola virus at an Ebola treatment centre in Beni, Eastern Congo. VOA

“Children who lose a parent due to Ebola are at risk of being stigmatized, isolated or abandoned, in addition to the experience of losing a loved one or primary caregiver.”

Boulierac says UNICEF worries about the physical, emotional and psychological wellbeing of these orphaned and separated children. He says his agency is tailoring its assistance programs to meet the specific needs of each individual child.

“For instance, a new-born who has lost his mother has different needs than a school-aged child. Our support to an orphaned or unaccompanied child typically includes psycho-social care, food and material assistance, and support to reintegrate into school,” Boulierac said.

Ebola, WHO, UNICEF
Congolese health workers register people and take their temperatures before they are vaccinated against Ebola in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. VOA

Ebola was declared on August 1 in the DRC’s conflict-ridden North Kivu and Ituri provinces. This is the 10th outbreak in the DRC since Ebola was first identified in 1976. Latest estimates by the World Health Organization find 147 confirmed and probable cases of Ebola in the eastern part of the country, including 97 deaths.

Also Read: Progress Has Been Made in Containing Ebola In Congo: WHO

WHO reports progress is being made in limiting the spread of the deadly virus in some areas. But, it warns the epidemic is far from over and much work to combat the disease lies ahead. (VOA)