Tuesday November 20, 2018
Home World Seventy Milli...

Seventy Million Children likely to die by 2030 if Nations lack Developmental Goals, warns UNICEF

3
//
Poor Kids. Image source: gogetfunding.com
Republish
Reprint
  • UNICEF urges governments, donors and NGOs to focus on the most disadvantaged children and close the gaps 
  • The migration and refugee crisis affecting Europe is one example of how inequalities are fueling global instability
  • UNICEF is urging countries to develop national plans so they can meet the 2030 sustainable development agenda

UNICEF, UN children’s agency, had warned that about 70 million of people could die between 2016 to 2030 if there parents and government do not put in efforts to achieve their developmental goals.

In its annual State of the World’s Children report issued Tuesday, June 28, UNICEF urges governments, donors and NGOs to focus on the most disadvantaged children and close the gaps, giving all young people a better chance at a bright future.

UNICEF (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
UNICEF (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

“These vast inequities and dangers do more than violate the rights and imperil the futures of individual children,” says UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake in the report. “They perpetuate inter-generational cycles of disadvantage and inequality that undermine the stability of societies and even the security of nations everywhere,” he added.

Follow NewsGram at Twitter: @newsgram1

The migration and refugee crisis affecting Europe is one example of how inequalities are fueling global instability, said Justin Forsyth, UNICEF deputy executive director.

“A combination of poor governance, conflict, but also inequality and inequity is fueling that instability, which is fueling that mass movement of people,” he said of the migrants on the move from North Africa.

Forsyth says the situation can be improved with small investments in health and education. “We could save up to 147 million children from death from under five [years old] child mortality, just with a 2 percent increase in expenditure in 74 countries.” That translates to about $30 billion a year.

UNICEF is urging countries to develop national plans so they can meet the ambitious targets they have committed to in the 2030 sustainable development agenda.

Africa struggling

The report raises the alarm for children in sub-Saharan Africa, where two out of three live in poverty and most have had less than four years of schooling.

Follow NewsGram at Facebook: NewsGram

Conflict, corruption, poor governance and the effects of climate change are hindering sustainable progress on the sub-continent.

Poor Children in Africa(Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Children in Africa. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“In those places like DR Congo, like South Sudan, like the Central African Republic, where a combination of conflict and poor governance has meant that they haven’t kept up with the rest of Africa, we need to continue to invest in those places,” said UNICEF Program Director Ted Chaiban.

UNICEF predicted if the developmental goals are not met, around 35 million African children will die before attaining an age of five from preventable causes and those who survive will have poor primary school attendance and 9 out of ten will live in extreme poverty. (VOA)

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • AJ Krish

    It is not only the government but also the public who should work towards child nourishment. We see children on the roads, deprived of food,education and a house to live in.Yet we do nothing! It should start from the very bottom if these children are to be saved.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Children are the future, there should be something done to not let it happen

  • Aparna Gupta

    Children are the future of any nation. Africa must take the appropriate measures to save their future.

SHARE
  • AJ Krish

    It is not only the government but also the public who should work towards child nourishment. We see children on the roads, deprived of food,education and a house to live in.Yet we do nothing! It should start from the very bottom if these children are to be saved.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Children are the future, there should be something done to not let it happen

  • Aparna Gupta

    Children are the future of any nation. Africa must take the appropriate measures to save their future.

Next Story

Thousands of Africans Fatally Affected Due To Fake Drugs

In Ivory Coast, many cannot afford to shop in pharmacies.

0
Drugs, Africa
A street vendor sells illegal and false drugs in a street of Adjame in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. VOA

When Moustapha Dieng came down with stomach pains one day last month he did the sensible thing and went to a doctor in his hometown of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso’s capital, Africa.

The doctor prescribed a malaria treatment but the medicine cost too much for Dieng, a 30-year-old tailor, so he went to an unlicensed street vendor for pills on the cheap.

“It was too expensive at the pharmacy. I was forced to buy street drugs as they are less expensive,” he said. Within days he was hospitalized — sickened by the very drugs that were supposed to cure him.

Africa
Able Ekissi, an inspector at the health ministry, told Reuters the seized goods. Pixabay

Tens of thousands of people in Africa die each year because of fake and counterfeit medication, an E.U.-funded report released on Tuesday said. The drugs are mainly made in China but also in India, Paraguay, Pakistan and the United Kingdom.

Almost half the fake and low-quality medicines reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) between 2013 and 2017 were found to be in sub-Saharan Africa, said the report, also backed by Interpol and the Institute for Security Studies.

“Counterfeiters prey on poorer countries more than their richer counterparts, with up to 30 times greater penetration of fakes in the supply chain,” said the report.

Substandard or fake anti-malarials cause the deaths of between 64,000 and 158,000 people per year in sub-Saharan Africa, the report said.

Africa
Opiates have some of the most cases of addiction due to their accessibility and intense ‘high’ – mostly beginning from something as simple as painkillers.

The counterfeit drug market is worth around $200 billion worldwide annually, WHO says, making it the most lucrative trade of illegally copied goods. Its impact has been devastating.

Nigeria said more than 80 children were killed in 2009 by a teething syrup tainted with a chemical normally used in engine coolant and blamed for causing kidney failure.

For Dieng, the cost can be measured in more than simple suffering. The night in hospital cost him more than double what he would have paid had he bought the drugs the doctor ordered.

“After taking those drugs, the provenance of which we don’t know, he came back with new symptoms … All this had aggravated his condition,” said nurse Jules Raesse, who treated Dieng when he stayed at the clinic last month.

Fake drugs also threaten a thriving pharmaceutical sector in several African countries.

Africa
Misuse of antibiotic drugs have lead to the threat of antimicrobial resistance, Pixabay

That has helped prompt Ivory Coast – where fake drugs were also sold openly – to crack down on the trade, estimated at $30 billion by Reuters last year.

Ivorian authorities said last month they had seized almost 400 tonnes of fake medicine over the past two years.

Able Ekissi, an inspector at the health ministry, told Reuters the seized goods, had they been sold to consumers, would have represented a loss to the legitimate pharmaceutical industry of more than $170 million.

“They are reputed to be cheaper, but at best they are ineffective and at worst toxic,” Abderrahmane Chakibi, Managing Director of French pharmaceutical firm Sanofi’s sub-Saharan Africa branch.

Also Read: Trump Presents Proposal To Lower the Price of Specific Drugs

But in Ivory Coast, many cannot afford to shop in pharmacies, which often only stock expensive drugs imported from France, rather than cheaper generics from places like India.

“When you have no means you are forced to go out onto the street,” said Barakissa Cherik, a pharmacist in Ivory Coast’s lagoon-side commercial capital Abidjan. (VOA)