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Shore Temple: The Water Shrine at the shore of Bay of Bengal

Shore temple- an ancient wonder of India

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Water Shrine at the shore of Bay of Bengal, credits- wikimedia
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Feb 27, 2017: Shore temple is a water shrine where canals bring sea water to the temple, is nestled in the small village of Mahabalipuram 60 kms from Chennai, facing the Bay of Bengal.

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Shore temple is a fine example of Dravidian architecture and Buddhist architectural influences, a 60 feet, 5-storied Hindu temple with shikhara, gopuram, and carvings of animals, made out of local granite, whereas other temples of that period are made out of rocks.

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The main shrine has remnants of Shiv and Vishnu, the temple is believed to have been built as a site of art rather than a site of worship.

Built during the 7th-8th century during the reign of the Pallava king Rajasimha and later continued by the Chola dynasty, it’s a UNESCO world heritage site since 1984.

In 2004 when the tsunami struck Southern India, parts of the temple were affected. Wind and seawater have also corroded some parts. Recently a stonewall has been constructed to protect it from seawater.

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This picturesque site also hosts the International Dance Festival, a month-long festival showcasing diverse forms of classical dance and art, promoted by the Tourism Department of Tamil Nadu, held every year during January-December.

 – prepared by Upama Bhattacharya. Twitter @Upama_myself

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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)