Tuesday March 26, 2019

Sikhism in Iran – a part of cultural diaspora

Iran was a secure country so, they started to do business in Iran.

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Sikhism, Image source: Wikimedia commons

Iran is a predominantly a Muslim populated country. The majority of the population that lives here are Muslims. In fact, Islam is the official religion of Islam. But there’s a lot more that Iran has to offer in terms of its cultural diversity.

Watch this video on Sikhism in Iran:

  • Besides Islam, there are several other minority religious groups living in Iran such as Jewish, Christian, Zoroastrians, Hindus etc.
  • Sikhs in Iran are sort of a closed community. The first Sikhs came to Iran from Punjab before 1947 via Zahedan border. Iran and India were neighbours and Pakistan was not yet established. Iran was a secure country so, they started to do business in Iran.
  • Sikhs are monotheists. They worship only one God (almighty). They believe that God brought them to this world to learn and follow his orders and also to build our lives according to his teachings.

Related articleIndia seeks enhanced economic ties with Iran

  • Sikhs men wear Turbans and women wear Indian traditional dresses. Everyone cover their head inside Gurudwaras as a sign of respect. There are even schools attached to the temples which are opened to non-Sikh students. Occasionally Langars (community kitchen) are organised in which pure vegetarian food are served.
  • There have been rumours that Sikhs were inspired by Iranian flags. Some speculate that the new Iran’s flag looks a lot like Sikh symbol.
  • Initially, nearly 5000 Sikhs were settled in Iran but with the Islamic revolution population of Sikhs declined significantly. Presently in Tehran (Iran’s national capital), nearly 60-100 families live.
Sikh community, Wikimedia commons
Sikh community, Wikimedia commons
  • Sikhs have been in Iran for more than 100 years. Apart from some occasional repressions, there hasn’t been any major violence in Iran against Indians (especially Hindus). Iranians love the Sikh community and same goes the other way round. Sikhs living there love Iran. They consider Iran as their homeland. Pleased with the government they feel safe and happy there.

Prepared by Pritam

Pritam is  a 3rd year engineering student in B.P. Poddar institute of management and technology, Kolkata. Twitter @pritam_gogreen

 

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    So good to hear about how pleased the Sikhs are with Iran. Really happy to know that people are understanding the shift caused by industrialization

Next Story

Iran-based Hackers Steal Data From Citrix

"Citrix deeply regrets the impact this incident may have on affected customers,"

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Iran-based hackers have stolen terabytes of data from desktop virtualisation leader Citrix, with the company admitting that the cyber criminals may have accessed and downloaded business documents.
“The specific documents that may have been accessed, however, are currently unknown. At this time, there is no indication that the security of any Citrix product or service was compromised,” Citrix Chief Information Security Officer Stan Black said in a blog post.
According to a report in The Registrar on Sunday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) last week warned Citrix about the data hack.
According to cyber security firm Resecurity, at least six terabytes of sensitive internal files were stolen by the Iranian-backed IRIDIUM hacker gang.
Cloudhopper, cyberattacks
Alister Shepherd, the director of a subsidiary of the cybersecurity firm FireEye, gestures during a presentation about the APT33 hacking group, which his firm suspects are Iranian government-aligned hackers, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. VOA
The researchers said they had alerted Citrix as early as December 28 last year about the ongoing attack.
“Citrix has taken action to contain the incident. We commenced a forensic investigation; engaged a leading cyber security firm to assist; took actions to secure our internal network; and continue to cooperate with the FBI,” Black wrote.
The hackers probably used a tactic known as “password spraying”, which exploits weak passwords. Once they gain a foothold with limited access, they worked to circumvent additional layers of security.
“Citrix deeply regrets the impact this incident may have on affected customers,” he said. (IANS)