Thursday June 21, 2018

Snake charmers in Pakistan- called jogis- keep the tradition alive

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Pakistan: In Pakistan, there is a tribe of snake charmers who call themselves Jogis. Their lifestyles can be seen as bizarre to some of us but to them it is more than a just way of surviving.

Misri Jogi, the chieftain of the tribe cites that his men travel across the province and make their earning by providing cheap entertainment to the children and the elders. According to him, while all snakes are valuable, the Cobra has always been regarded as a sacred being. In their tribe, Jogi jokingly says, that they don’t love their wives as much as they love their Cobra. On the other hand, it is actually true that the snake is treated like a child of the family. They consider it as their friend and their companion. They even take the snake with them to their bed during the months of winter, to keep it warm.

The training that is provided to the children to become a successful snake charmer starts from the birth itself. A child of five or six months is given a taste of a Cobra poison.

One aspect of it is that the Cobra produces a talisman called Mannka, in the local language, which protects them from snake bites. The talisman sucks the poison from the blood while swelling in the process and then the person transfers the poison into a cotton ball.

Though the increasing provision, for formal education and stable jobs, is making many of the present generation to lose interest in their ancestral profession.

Misri Jogi, despite the transitions still hopes that the present youth will continue the traditions of the tribe well into the future.

 

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  • gauri

    it is good to know of a tribe who still believe in keeping their traditions alive

  • vedika kakar

    Cobra tribes have been in India for ages, they are no surprise and honestly are pretty cool

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Watching Movies Breaks Barriers Of Culture: Rajyavardhan Rathore

He said even if the language of the film is not understood, the emotion in a film is understood

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Watching Movies Breaks Barriers Of Culture: Rajyavardhan Rathore
Watching Movies Breaks Barriers Of Culture: Rajyavardhan Rathore, flickr

Watching movies can break barriers of colour and culture, Minister of Information and Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Rathore said here while inaugurating the European Union Film Festival.

Rathore on Monday inaugurated the gala, where 24 latest European movies are being screened from 23 European countries. The festival, which opened with Slovakian movie “Little Harbour”, will traverse through 11 cities in India, read a PIB statement.

Rathore said the charm in watching a film is in seeing the story as well as meeting people, and that is the essence of a film festival. He said that though people across the border vary by skin colour and culture, they are one people, and that watching films breaks these barriers and the story gets communicated to the people of any country.

He said even if the language of the film is not understood, the emotion in a film is understood through the body language.

Cinema
Cinema, flickr

The fest is organised by the Directorate of Film Festivals, partnering with the delegation of the European Union and embassies of EU member states in various city film clubs. It has movies from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain and Sweden.

Also read: Actor Naseeruddin Shah Says, 50 Years From Now Cinema Halls Would Be Found In Museums

It will travel through New Delhi, Chennai, Port Blair, Pune, Puducherry, Kolkata, Jaipur, Visakhapatnam, Thrissur, Hyderabad and Goa till August 31. (IANS)