Thursday March 21, 2019
Home India Social Media:...

Social Media: Here is how it is creating Lifestyle pressure on Youth!

In these so-called "modern times", it has become so important for the students to ‘fit in’, to be considered ‘cool’ and ‘popular’, to have maximum like and comments on their uploads

0
//
Social Media, sarcasm
Researchers Develop System to detect Sarcasm on Social Media. Pixabay

Feb 18, 2017: Raksha Sharma, 20, had committed suicide in Jalandhar, Punjab over obscene comments on Facebook by two friends. This incident which took place in November, 2012,  left many people shocked and alarmed. The incident made everyone wonder for the first time about the amount of pressure social media puts on adolescents. Years later, this still remains a cause of worry.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Facebook, twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and many more endless social media platforms consume most of our time on a daily basis. On an average, a teenager spends approximately an hour on social media every day.

It is a no shock that social media has become such an inseparable part of our lives. The scenario is such that we compromise a hot delicious meal for the sake of uploading a picture of it on Social Media.

In these so-called “modern times”, it has become so important for the students to ‘fit in’, to be considered ‘cool’ and ‘popular’, to have maximum like and comments on their uploads. What serves as a cause of worry is that social media, in some way or the other is affecting the lifestyles of people.

All of a sudden, smoking and drinking are considered as “cool habits”, whereas going to the “hottest new places” and attending the “funkiest parties” has become an absolute necessity.

This “Digital Age” has shaped our views in such a way, that we tend to spend more time living in this Virtual World, alienating ourselves from the Real World. Our days start and end by checking our smartphones and giving 100% priority to our social life when the sad truth is that, we have a friend list of thousands but still feel lonely and depressed on the inside.

Children aged 10, concentrate more on their Social Media accounts rather than their books. They have a higher knowledge of the latest apps than of their own curriculum. More time is spent in Parties and get-togethers in clicking selfies and talking to other people online, than in talking to the people present right in front of us.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

A smartphone with a good camera, in fact, the expensive Apple iPhone and DSLR cameras are considered as necessary so that Social Media accounts have great pictures in it.

Oxygen for the Youth today: Social Media; Source: Pixabay

Another matter which is disturbing is the fact that social media has somehow created this image of what’s perfect. Many girls who do not have a size-zero figure have fallen into self-loathing whereas guys are taking to the gyms for the perfect abs.

Wearing clothes of a particular label or brand, using certain items like makeup etc. are considered to be the rule by teenagers. In a way, social media has ripped them of their choices by creating imaginary guidelines of what is right and what is not.

Announcing everything on Social Media exposes users to a great deal of threat like cyberbullying, character shaming etc. It is a platform where people can become both famous and infamous. Sometimes, being put down on the Social Media platforms leads to chronic depression. Also, it gives greater power to people to do things which they know are wrong by hiding their true identities like defaming someone, getting into false contracts etc.

Social media is a virtual platform where it is very easy to modify the truth. Recently, a group working to create awareness about mental health carried out a unique project. They created a fake Instagram account where they uploaded pictures of a girl travelling to different places and enjoying her vacation. However, this project wanted to highlight how easily we ignore signs of mental tension. The fact that the girl had a glass of alcohol in her each single picture went unnoticed by the innumerable followers.

So, it is very easy to hide certain facts and show only what we want to on Social Media platforms. This is the reason why we never find people sharing sad pictures of themselves or bad experiences over social media, only happy ones.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

What we need to realize now and work upon is the fact that we control social media; it does not control us. We should have the power to ignore the negative influence it can have on us and not fall prey to it. It should be our choice to stop addicting about it and share only what we wish to show to the public and not every small detail.

-By Nikita Saraf of NewsGram; Twitter:  @niki-saraf

 

Next Story

Despite All The Efforts, Political Campaign Spends on Social Media Remain A Mystery

But even as the Election Commission has made social media companies follow certain norms, such as pre-certification of political ads to prevent misuse of the platforms, such measures are unlikely to bring adequate transparency to the whole process

0
social media
The Election Commission is in talks with the representatives of Internet companies, including social media platforms, on the use of social media for campaigning in the Lok Sabha polls while the Model Code of Conduct is in force. Pixabay

Despite all the efforts put in place by social media companies to show who is paying for the political advertisements on their platforms, the users may not know the actual amount spent to run political campaigns on these websites.

Facebook has a searchable database for political ads which anyone can access. This Ad Library report from the social media giant shows that Indians have spent over Rs 6.5 crore in over 30,000 ads related to politics since February 2019 — in the run up to the general elections.

Similarly, Twitter also has an Ad Transparency Centre which allows one to search which account has spent how much in the past seven days.

social media
“In terms of political ads, social media companies should allow only certified agencies to post ads. This would make the monitoring process much easier for everyone. Allowing any individual to post political ads complicates the monitoring process. This is a big loophole,” he said. Pixabay

While these efforts are being regarded as important steps towards bringing transparency in the political process, they may not reflect the complete picture of how the social media space operates, according to experts.

“Influencers play a very important role in political campaigns and 90 per cent of the transactions related to these campaigns are done through cash,” social media expert Anoop Mishra told IANS.

Knowing which party is spending how much on social media is important because much of what trends on Twitter or what becomes popular on Facebook – with potential to impact voter behaviour – may actually be due to the money and manpower of political parties while creating an illusion of organic support from hundreds and thousands of users in these platforms.

“Every political party including the BJP (Bharatiya Janata Party), Congress, Samajwadi Party and BSP (Bahujan Samaj Party) are trying to push their agenda on social media. But those parties with greater money, manpower and tech expertise are likely to win the social media war,” Mishra said.

He added that political parties were employing a large number of people to make their propaganda material viral on social media.

twitter
Similarly, Twitter also has an Ad Transparency Centre which allows one to search which account has spent how much in the past seven days.
Pixabay

“In terms of political ads, social media companies should allow only certified agencies to post ads. This would make the monitoring process much easier for everyone. Allowing any individual to post political ads complicates the monitoring process. This is a big loophole,” he said.

“Encrypted platforms like WhatsApp could be used extensively to spread advertisements and propaganda, which could be difficult to be tracked,” added Prasanth Sugathan, Legal Director, Software Freedom Law Centre (SFLC.in), a Delhi-based not-for-profit legal services body.

Also Read: Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity
The Election Commission is in talks with the representatives of Internet companies, including social media platforms, on the use of social media for campaigning in the Lok Sabha polls while the Model Code of Conduct is in force.

But even as the Election Commission has made social media companies follow certain norms, such as pre-certification of political ads to prevent misuse of the platforms, such measures are unlikely to bring adequate transparency to the whole process. (IANS)