Friday October 18, 2019

Social Media Tends to Scrutinize Female Stars More Than Male Stars, Says Richa Chadha

Actress Richa Chadha, known for her opinions, says she has observed how, at times, mainstream and social media tend to scrutinise female stars more

0
//
criticise, Richa Chadha, Gender, discrimination, female, male
Although she was criticised by a section of the media in her initial days, she holds all her critics in high regard. Pixabay

Actress Richa Chadha, who is known to be vocal with her opinions, says she has observed how, at times, mainstream and social media tend to scrutinise female stars more than male stars. Although she was criticised by a section of the media in her initial days, she holds all her critics in high regard.

Richa told IANS: “Mainstream media as well as social media tends to be unfair towards female stars, and female stars get trolled and criticised more than their male counterparts. I can say this from my observation of the way media constantly questions Priyanka Chopra Jonas, Swara Bhaskar, Sonam Kapoor and other female stars for their choices – whether it is fashion, political opinion or lifestyle. Do they question the male stars enough as well?”

Citing examples of films that have released this year and earned commercial success, the “Fukrey” fame actress mentioned: “How many times has the media questioned male actors on films that are jingoistic and encourage warmongering? During the press conference of my film “Section 375″, I was asked about my opinion on the flood-affected areas. Do they ask these questions to the real people who actually can bring change – I mean the authorities and politicians?”

In “Section 375”, she plays the female lead and received a lot of positive reviews from the critics. However, in her initial days, she experienced both sides of media coverage but she learnt to handle everything gracefully.

On negative media coverage, Richa said: “I am very cordial with my critics because how they write about me is their prerogative. In my initial days, I have had press call me ugly. They called me names for my appearance in a film where I was not required to look glamorous. An article was written on me, titled ‘10 things that one hates about Richa Chadha’ by a publication. If a journalist tries to belittle me, I would rather grow a thick skin, instead of taking the negativity to my heart.”

criticise, Richa Chadha, Gender, discrimination, female, male
Instead of trial by media, it should be trial by law: Richa Chadha on #MeToo. Flickr

“There is a difference between critiquing and being mean to someone, and I know that,” she added.

Over the past few years, Richa has also been trolled – whether in 2016 for her comment on the commonality between herself and Pakistani actor Fawad Khan at the Indian Film Festival of Melbourne, or when random social media users called her names. However, she always gives the trollers back.

Richa is gearing up for “Panga” next year, and her gameplan is very much in place.

“I will be continuing experimenting with my work and I will be in a good space in the coming future, also because this is what the wisdom and experiment teach you. These days actors get encouraged to do experimental work but I have been doing it since my early days,” said the actress who portrayed a grandmother in the film “Gangs Of Wasseypur” when she was just 24 years old.

ALSO READ: World Leaders Gathering in New York for United Nations Summit on Climate Change

Asked about where she gathers confidence from, Richa said: “There are women before me like Smita Patil, Shabana Azmi, and Deepti Naval who have shown the courage of doing experimental films and of course they are inspirational for us.”

“Also, I am happy the way women are getting appreciation beyond their age. You know, when people say there is one Meryl Streep, I disagree, there are also Helen Mirren, Nicole Kidman, and Judi Dench, and everyone is nailing it in the films they do! Because age has nothing to do with performance,” she smiled. (IANS)

Next Story

Mothers Who are Dissatisfied with Their Male Partners Spend More Time Talking to Their Baby Boy

The quality of a couple's relationship is known to be related to developmental outcomes such as their behaviour and educational attainment

0
Mothers, Male, Partners
It's possible that the mum is trying to compensate for the poor relationship she has with her partner by putting more time and effort into her relationship with her other close male social partner, her son. Pixabay

If you find that your wife is spending more time talking to the baby boy at home, check whether your relationship is heading in the right direction or not.

According to researchers from University of Cambridge, mothers who are dissatisfied with their male partners spend more time talking to their infants — but only if the child is a boy.

“It’s possible that the mum is trying to compensate for the poor relationship she has with her partner by putting more time and effort into her relationship with her other close male social partner, her son,” said Elian Fink from the Centre for Family Research and the Faculty of Education.

The quality of a couple’s relationship is known to be related to developmental outcomes such as their behaviour and educational attainment in school-aged children, but has been little studied in relation to parent-infant talk, despite parent-infant talk being important for the child’s development.

Mothers, Male, Partners
If you find that your wife is spending more time talking to the baby boy at home, check whether your relationship is heading in the right direction or not. Pixabay

To examine the relationship between the quality of a couple’s relationship and parent-infant talk, researchers studied 93 first-time, heterosexual parents and their interactions with their infants.

The team asked parents about the quality of their couple relationship and how satisfied they were and then gave the infants at age seven months a wearable ‘talk pedometer’ that recorded naturalistic parent-infant talk for a full day in which both parents were at home.

The researchers used software to provide an automated analysis of the frequency of adult spoken words to their infant and of parent-infant ‘conversations’.

After taking depression into account (because of its links with both couple relationship quality and parent-infant talk), the researchers found that the more dissatisfied a couple reported their relationship to be, the more the mother spoke to her infant.

Also Read- Teenagers Who are Not in Romantic Relationship have Good Social Skills, Low Depression

Mothers who reported the quality of their relationship to be ‘low’ used around 35 per cent more words than a mother whose relationship was ‘average’ and started around 20 per cent more conversations.

However, these effects were only found with infant sons, not daughters, said the findings published in the Journal of Family Psychology.

The researchers did not analyse the content of the mother-infant talk, so it is not possible to say whether the mother was complaining to her infant or talking positively.

“What is particularly interesting is that mums only seem to compensate when they have infant sons, not daughters. It could be that mothers’ view their daughters as mini versions of themselves rather than of their partners,” said Fink.

Mothers, Male, Partners
According to researchers from University of Cambridge, mothers who are dissatisfied with their male partners spend more time talking to their infants — but only if the child is a boy. Pixabay

Regardless of infant gender, fathers showed significantly less overall talk and initiated fewer conversations than did mothers, even though fathers are increasingly becoming involved in parenting.

Also Read- Blood Pressure-Lowering Effect of Exercise Significantly Reduces When People Rinse their Mouths with Mouthwash

“Finding time to talk to children is very important. Using opportunities within the daily routine, such as mealtimes and bedtime, to have conversations with your child may help foster later child talk,” Fink noted. (IANS)