Home India Solar power t...

Solar power to light up Chinnaswamy cricket stadium in Bangalore

0

 

M.Chinnaswamy-Stadium-Bangalore-ipl

 

By NewsGram Staff Writer

In a first of its kind, the Chinnaswamy cricket stadium in Bangalore has decided to go green by using solar power generated from photovoltaic cells to light up the sports complex.

Set up under the Indo-German environmental partnership and installed by RonXSol Ecotech Ltd, ahead of the Indian Premier League (IPL) T20 tournament, the solar panels will generate 440 kilovolts or six lakh units per annum.

“Our stadium is the first in the country to install solar panels on the rooftop above the eastern stands to generate about 1,700 units of power daily to meet a part of our energy requirements,” a Karnataka State Cricket Association (KSCA) said.

The combined solar panels will have the potential to generate 18-lakh units per year to meet about 40-50 per cent of its peak requirement annually.

Speaking on the development, KSCA spokesman Vinay Mrutyunjaya said, “Going forward, similar panels will be installed on the western side rooftop to generate an additional 850kv after this summer.”

“We have invested Rs.3 crore to install the solar cells on top of eastern stands and will invest Rs.7 crore for similar panels on top of western stands by this year-end,” Mrutyunjaya further added.

The stadium consumes maximum energy for lighting the ground, stands, dressing rooms, pavilion and other facilities when hosting the Indian Premier League (IPL) matches in summer and day-night One-Day Internationals (ODIs) when scheduled.

Elaborating the decision to introduce solar power in the stadium, Mrutyunjaya said, “Though the city is located at about 3,000 feet and has the most salubrious climate in the country, sunlight is available in abundance for about 10 months a year, as we are in the tropical region to generate plenty of clean energy.”

“We will be saving Rs.40-50 lakh on electricity bills by using solar energy for our power needs. We will also supply to the state grid on days when matches are not played and have surplus solar power to spare,” he added.

The association plans to reduce its expenditure on power supplied by the utility provider at commercial rate by using solar power.

 

Next Story

Pandemic, Pandemonium and Booze 

Lockdown 3.0 sees long queues as liquor shops across the nation open

0
booze
People queue up to get alcohol amid lockdown across the country, Pixabay

By Varuni Trivedi

Monday, saw a nationwide brawl and chaos as the government relaxed the stringent lockdown. Serpentine queues outside liquor shops were a common sight as men and women flocked to stock up on booze amidst the third phase of lockdown. While the central government has issued clear guidelines on social distancing, it was adhered to in some places while others saw complete chaos. Some states have reported a high excise earning as the liquor sales soared high after relaxations.

As the Delhi government on Sunday announced implementing the latest lockdown relaxations suggested by Union Ministry of Home Affairs around 150 liquor shops located outside the coronavirus containment zones opened on Monday. To get their hands on booze people flouted social distancing norms, a liquor shop in New Delhi’s Malviya Nagar saw more than a hundred people lined up,  the Police were called to take charge of the situation. Many other cities saw a similar scenario, people had gathered outside shops as early as 6 am in the morning. In some places the situation got out of control and shops were shut by the owners before the set time. However, the sale of liquor in malls, restaurants and permit rooms is still prohibited across the nation during lockdown 3.0.

booze
Liquor sales soared on Monday amidst lockdown relaxation. Pixabay

Social distancing went down the gutters in Mumbai, Bengaluru, and Kolkata too as people were seen in queues as long as 1 to 2kms outside liquor shops. In some cities, the Police had to resort to mild lathi-charge in order to get a hold of the situation. However, interestingly enough at some shops in Bengaluru staffers were seen thermal screening the customers in fear of COVID-19 spread. In UP’s Mirzapur a shopkeeper was seen showering petals on his customer.

According to the excise department Uttar Pradesh recorded a sale of over 100 crores on Monday itself, the Principal Secretary, Excise, Sanjay Bhoosreddy said: “I don’t think there would be any single industry with just less than one lakh workforce that gives ₹100 crore revenue (to the state exchequer) in a day”. Likewise, Karnataka’s excise department released a statement estimating the value of liquor sales on the first day to be around 450 million rupees. Mahasamund district’s women in Chhattisgarh staged a protest against the liquor shops opening condemning the government’s decision. Other places however saw a considerable number of women outside liquor shops. 

Also Read: Celebrities Across Country Question the Decision to Open Liquor Shops

The country saw a bittersweet situation where on one side the uncontainable happiness on the faces of customers was unmatchable while on the other side social distancing norms were flouted and the Police faced a tough time in managing the crowds. A lot of places witnessed utter chaos which led the owners to shut down the shops before time.

 

Next Story

Find Out How Solar Power Can Improve Healthcare System in Rural India

Solar power can improve healthcare in rural India, say leaders

0
solar power healthcare
In a letter to the government of India, leaders called for action, making the case for solarising all unelectrified sub-centres in rural India. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Nearly 20 leaders from think tanks, research groups, renewable energy companies, sustainable development organisations and industry associations on Thursday said India’s weak healthcare infrastructure in rural areas are being exposed due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

In a letter to the government of India, they called for action, making the case for solarising all unelectrified sub-centres in rural India. The ongoing COVID-19 crisis has highlighted several existing systemic gaps in services, especially to the rural poor.

Inadequate healthcare infrastructure is one of them. Over 39,000 sub-centres, the first point of contact between primary healthcare system and the community, serving 230 million people in rural India lack electricity. This severely impacts their capacity to offer optimal healthcare to patients.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news

Decentralised renewable energy (DRE) can play a significant role in solving this problem quickly and affordably, for less than Rs 30 per person in initial capital expenditure. The letter outlines four key interventions that the government can undertake in order to help alleviate the situation.

solar power healthcare
India’s weak healthcare infrastructure in rural areas are being exposed due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Pixabay

They are:

First, expanding the programme to solarise clinics, drawing from the example of Chhattisgarh which has successfully done this. Second, allocating dedicated funding towards this initiative, which would amount to just 0.6 per cent of the current 2020-21 energy and healthcare budget.

Third, ensuring long-term operations and sustainability by working through existing structures. And fourth, promoting innovation in order to develop more financially viable and energy-efficient medical equipment.

Also Read- Irrfan Khan Not Just an Artist but a Legend: Fanboy Priyanshu Chatterjee

The letter is being sent to the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, the National Centre for Disease Control, the National Health Systems Resource Centre, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, the Ministry of Power, and Niti Aayog.

“Sustainable health infrastructure that leverages innovative, decentralised and energy efficient solutions will bring huge dividends for health in rural India,” Centre for Environmental Health Deputy Director Poornima Prabhakaran said. “Transitioning to renewable energies across healthcare operations will ensure efficient service delivery and improved health outcomes.” (IANS)

Next Story

Solar Power Starts Growing in Vietnam

Vietnam Goes Big on Solar Power

0
Solar Power
Solar power is making a strong showing in Vietnam after years of shuttling from one extreme to the other. Pixabay

Solar power is making a strong showing in Vietnam after years of shuttling from one extreme to the other, with the nation looking sometimes like it would revert to coal, and other times like it would invest in renewable energy.

By the end of last year Vietnam had surpassed Malaysia and Thailand to reach the largest installed capacity of solar power in Southeast Asia, with 44% of the total capacity, according to figures from Wood Mackenzie, a firm that sells consulting services in the energy industry.

The figures show that Vietnam is serious about solar power, an issue that had been up for debate for years. Solar supporters were encouraged to see the government offer a high feed in tariff (FIT), a fee pioneered in Germany to let solar panel owners sell power to the grid. This helped push Vietnam to reach 5.5 gigawatts of solar capacity last year.

Vietnam is also planning to construct more power plants fed with coal, casting doubt on the goal of more clean energy. Public resistance to coal appears to have shelved some of the construction, at least for now.

Solar Power
Solar power installation near a wind turbine at the Phu Lac wind farm in southern Vietnam’s Binh Thuan province. Pixabay

“FITs have proven to be an effective policy tool to induce rapid growth in renewables, and Vietnam’s build is another example of that,” Rishab Shrestha, a solar analyst at Wood Mackenzie, said. He added that “project economics will continue to remain attractive in large parts of Vietnam.”

Like other nations, Vietnam has yet to deal with some of the potential drawbacks of solar power, such as how to dispose of photo voltaic panels responsibly. The panels contain toxic chemicals like lead and cannot be recycled easily.

However solar and other renewable power, such as from wind, remains one of the cleanest options for Vietnam at the moment. It joins a growing global trend, from California, which enacted a law this year to require all new homes come with solar panels, to India, where railways are switching to solar power.

Next, Vietnam will have to decide how much it will pay for solar power. The tariff used to be more than nine U.S. cents per kilowatt hour but that price expired in June. Investors are waiting on a decision, which is being jointly prepared by three ministries, the Office of the Government, and the state power utility, according to Duane Morris Vietnam LLC, a law firm that advises clients on solar power. As part of the process, Vietnam Electricity, the state utility, sent a letter to the trade ministry with recommendations on how to set the tariff and who would be eligible.

Also Read- Tech Giant Samsung Bags Top Position in US Home Appliances Market For Fourth Consecutive Year

“The submission letter is not very clear,” said Oliver Massmann, general director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC, in a blog post.

However he predicts that the government will settle on a tariff of just over seven U.S. cents per kilowatt hour for ground-mounted solar power projects, and a slightly higher tariff for floating solar power projects. Vietnam is pushing investors to provide power more affordably as consumption needs rise in the fast-growing economy. (VOA)