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Son of Nigerian Immigrant Anthony Oshinuga Fulfills his childhood Dream of Flying Aircraft

Oshinuga began his pilot training 8 years ago and earned his commercial flying license in 2013 and he first entered national flying competitions in 2014

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Anthony Oshinuga living his dreams!
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  • Oshinuga began his pilot training 8 years ago and earned his commercial flying license in 2013
  • He runs a small tour company called Air Oshinuga, he flies over the wine country of Temecula in his second aircraft, a 1940s-era Cessna buffed
  • In 2015, he flew as a rookie in the Reno National Championship Air Race in Nevada, placing second in the biplane category

TEMECULA, CALIF, SEPT 06, 2016:  Son of a Nigerian immigrant fulfills his desires to fly. Anthony Oshinuga arrives early most of the days at a California airport to check his vintage Cessna aircraft, ready to shuttle passengers over Temecula Valley, the booming wine country north of San Diego. He has been fulfilling his childhood dreams! Later he would  fly loops and rolls in his Pitts Special, an aerobatic aircraft.

Oshinuga was born in 1981. His parents belonged to Lagos, Nigeria, and they later moved on to Austin, Texas in the previous year. His dreams for aviation began when he was 5 years old. “I was taken by what was going on,” he recalls. “I told my father, that’s exactly what I want to do.”

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He runs a small tour company called Air Oshinuga, he flies over the wine country of Temecula in his second aircraft, a 1940s-era Cessna buffed and polished so it looks brand new. He has partnership with two of the many wineries in this valley, the largest wine-producing region in southern California.

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Pilot Anthony Oshinuga

“We provide clients with 30-minute aerial scenic flights over Temecula, and then we land and they go down there and do wine tasting,” he explained.

Oshinuga began his pilot training 8 years ago and earned his commercial flying license in 2013. He first entered national flying competitions in 2014.

“That’s when I went to the US National Aerobatic Championships (in Denison, Texas), and placed fourth out of 25 competitors,” he recalls. “Since then, things have been really blossoming in the arena of aerobatics and air shows and air racing.”

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In 2015, he flew as a rookie in the Reno National Championship Air Race in Nevada, placing second in the biplane category.

Oshinuga pursued Engineering from the University of California, Riverside. He says that Engineering pays his bills but Aviation is what is his heart calls for!

– prepared by Manthra Koliyer with inputs from VOA

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U.S. Appeals Court Refuses To Enforce Asylum Ban On Immigrants

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Asylum, Trump
A migrant family from Central America waits outside the Annunciation House shelter in El Paso, Texas, after a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer drops them off. VOA

A divided U.S. appeals court late Friday refused to immediately allow the Trump administration to enforce a ban on asylum for any immigrants who illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

The ban is inconsistent with an existing U.S. law and an attempted end-run around Congress, a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in a 2-1 decision.

“Just as we may not, as we are often reminded, ‘legislate from the bench,’ neither may the Executive legislate from the Oval Office,” 9th Circuit Judge Jay Bybee, a nominee of Republican President George W. Bush, wrote for the majority.

Refugees, Migrants, Asylum seekers, Trump
Men line up for dinner outside a shelter housing members of the migrant caravan, in Tijuana, Mexico. VOA

A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Justice, Steven Stafford, did not have comment. But he referred to an earlier statement that called the asylum system broken and said the department looked forward to “continuing to defend the Executive Branch’s legitimate and well-reasoned exercise of its authority to address the crisis at our southern border.”

Trump proclamation

At issue is President Donald Trump’s Nov. 9 proclamation that barred anyone who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border between official ports of entry from seeking asylum. Trump issued the proclamation in response to caravans of migrants approaching the border.

A lower court judge temporarily blocked the ban and later refused to immediately reinstate it. The administration appealed to the 9th Circuit for an immediate stay of Judge Jon Tigar’s Nov. 19 temporary restraining order.

In a dissenting opinion Friday, 9th Circuit Judge Edward Leavy said the administration “adopted legal methods to cope with the current problems rampant at the southern border.” Nothing in the law the majority cited prevented a rule categorically barring eligibility for asylum on the basis of how a person entered the country, Leavy, a nominee of Republican President Ronald Reagan, said.

Refugees, Migrants, Asylum seekers, Trump
Honduran migrant Genesis Belen Mejia Flores, 7, waves an American flag at U.S. border control helicopters flying overhead near the Benito Juarez Sports Center serving as a temporary shelter for Central American migrants, in Tijuana, Mexico. VOA

Federal law is clear

In his Nov, 19 ruling, Tigar sided with legal groups who argued that federal law is clear that immigrants in the U.S. can request asylum regardless of whether they entered legally.

The president “may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden,” the judge said in his order.

Also Read: Refugees’ Entitled To Claim The Right To Asylum in The U.S: U.N.

The ruling led to an unusual public dispute between Trump and Chief Justice John Roberts after Trump dismissed Tigar — an appointee of Trump’s predecessor — as an “Obama judge.”

Roberts responded with a statement that the federal judiciary doesn’t have “Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges.” (VOA)