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South Asians in US more prone to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

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Washington: South Asians in US are more prone to heart attacks and diabetes when compared to other ethnic groups, as highlighted in a health congress here.

The American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (AAPI) has highlighted various preventive healthcare initiatives at the First World Congress on Preventive Healthcare 2015 in Houston, Texas.

Aimed at creating global awareness about preventive healthcare, the three-day Congress held from July 10-12 was part of the North American Bengali Conference (NABC) 2015, organized by Tagore Society of Houston.

The Congress highlighted that one American dies every 40 seconds in the US from cardiovascular diseases. A disproportionate burden of this risk is seen in the 3.4 million South Asians who live in the US.

The risks for heart attacks and cardiovascular deaths can be up to five times higher for South Asians when compared to other ethnic groups.

The total number of people with diabetes is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030.

In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the population, had diabetes and 13 percent of Asian Indians had diabetes.

While South Asians have a one in three lifetime risk for developing diabetes, total costs of diagnosed diabetes in the US in 2012 were $245 billion.

Dr. Sumita Chowdhury, chairperson for the Congress, appealed to the South Asian community to help conquer the epidemics of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes by joining the the South Asian Cardiovascular Registry.

Bringing together all stakeholders in the healthcare to formulate a shared vision towards prevention of disease, the Congress was intended to create sustainable measures for prevention that can be adapted worldwide and integrated into the fabric of life.

The forum was a way to evaluate the factors contributing to the increased disease risk among South Asians and help to formulate awareness campaigns to help modify risk factors that are specific to this ethnic group.

AAPI President Dr Seema Jain, highlighted various initiatives taken by the largest ethnic association of medical professionals in the US, in America and in India for preventing health risks and bringing the best healthcare to millions of people.

An estimated 1.2 million physicians of Indian origin working around the world have made enormous contributions to the world of healthcare, she said.

Jain pointed out that Indian-Americans constitute less than one percent of the population in the US, but they account for nearly nine percent of the physicians in the country.

Serving in almost all parts of America, they are estimated to provide healthcare to over 40 million patients in the US, she said.

(IANS)

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Having Milk in Breakfast Helps in Managing The Risk of Diabetes

This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels

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Milk
Drinking milk at breakfast might help manage diabetes. Pixabay

If you are diabetic, then consuming milk at breakfast can help lower blood glucose level throughout the day, suggests a study.

The findings showed that milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast reduced blood glucose even after lunch, and high-protein milk had a greater effect.

Milk with an increased proportion of whey protein had a modest effect on pre-lunch blood glucose, achieving a greater decrease than that provided by regular milk.

The high-protein treatment also reduced appetite after the second meal compared with the low-protein equivalent.

“Metabolic diseases are on the rise globally, with type-2 diabetes and obesity as leading concerns in human health,” said Professor Douglas Goff, from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Thus, there is impetus to develop dietary strategies for the risk reduction and management of obesity and diabetes to empower consumers to improve their personal health,” he added.

For the study, published in the Journal of Dairy Science, the team included over 100 persons to examine the effects of increasing protein concentration and increasing the proportion of whey protein in milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast cereal on blood glucose, feelings of satiety, and food consumption later in the day.

Also Read- Punjab Gets Tech-Savy and Eco-friendly

Although the team only found a modest difference in food consumption at the lunch meal when increasing whey protein at breakfast, they found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and high dairy protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with normal dairy protein concentration.

“This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels. Nutritionists have always stressed the importance of a healthy breakfast, and this study should encourage consumers to include milk,” Goff said. (IANS)

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