Saturday August 18, 2018

Study Shows That Drug to treat bleeding may benefit some stroke patients

A drug, currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, may benefit patients with stroke caused by bleeding in the brain -- intracerebral haemorrhage, a clinical trial suggests.

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A drug, currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, may benefit patients with stroke caused by bleeding in the brain — intracerebral haemorrhage, a clinical trial suggests.

Intracerebral haemorrhage occurs when a diseased blood vessel within the brain bursts, allowing blood to leak inside the brain.

The study, published in the journal The Lancet, found that giving tranexamic acid (TXA) to people who had experienced intracerebral haemorrhage reduced the number of deaths in the early days following the stroke.

It also showed that both the amount of bleeding in the brain and the number of associated serious complications were lower in the patients who had received the TXA treatment, the researchers from the University of Nottingham said.

 

For the study, researchers recruited more than 2,000 patients who were diagnosed as having had bleeding in the brain -- confirmed by CT scan -- from 124 hospitals in 12 countries between 2013 and 2017.
representational image, Pixabay

Patients who received TXA treatment experienced lower associated serious complications — such as pneumonia and brain swelling — as compared to those who had not, the researchers added.

 

However, the trial found no difference in the number of people who were left disabled or had died at three months after their stroke — the study’s primary outcome.

“While we failed to show significant benefits three months after stroke, the reduction in early deaths, amount of bleeding on the brain and serious complications are signs that this drug may be of benefit in the future,” said co-author Nikola Sprigg, Professor at the University of Nottingham.

For the study, researchers recruited more than 2,000 patients who were diagnosed as having had bleeding in the brain — confirmed by CT scan — from 124 hospitals in 12 countries between 2013 and 2017.

They were randomly sorted into two patient groups — one received TXA within eight hours of their stroke and another was given a saline placebo.

Also Read: Study Shows That 3 Cups of Coffee or Tea Daily May Cut Risk of Stroke

CT scans of the patients’ brains were performed 24 hours after their stroke and their progress was monitored and measured at day two and day seven after their stroke. The final follow up was performed at 90 days.

The researchers have highlighted the need for further studies to find out whether giving an earlier dose of TXA might be beneficial for patients. (IANS)

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Scientists Develop Potential Approach to Treat Dementia, Stroke

"It also shows that these changes may be reversible, paving the way for potential treatments," Williams added

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The article provides information on the topic "Scientists Develop Potential Approach to Treat Dementia, Stroke". (IANS)

Stopping blood vessel cells from becoming dysfunctional may reverse the symptoms of small vessel disease (SVD) — major cause of dementia and stroke — and prevent brain damage in older adults, scientists have found.

The study, led by the University of Edinburgh, found that SVD occurs when cells that line the small blood vessels in the brain become dysfunctional causing them to secrete a molecule into the brain.

The molecule stops production of the protective layer that surrounds brain cells — called myelin — leading to brain damage.

“This important research helps us understand why small vessel disease happens, providing a direct link between small blood vessels and changes in the brain that are linked to dementia,” said Anna Williams from University of Edinburgh’s MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Scotland.

“It also shows that these changes may be reversible, paving the way for potential treatments,” Williams added.

1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay
1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay

In the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team used rat model and found that treating them with drugs that can reverse changes in blood vessels in the brain associated with cerebral small vessel disease.

“The findings highlight a promising direction for research into treatments that could limit the damaging effects of blood vessel changes and help keep nerve cells functioning for longer,” said Sara Imarisio, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Research in Britain.

Also Read: Sleep Disorder Linked with Brain Changes Found in Dementia

However, further studies are needed to test whether the treatment also works when the disease is firmly established, researchers said.

Dementia is one of the biggest problems facing society, as people live longer and the population ages.

Estimates indicate there are almost 47 million people living with dementia worldwide and the numbers affected are expected to double every 20 years, rising to more than 115 million by 2050. (IANS)