Tuesday October 23, 2018

Study Shows That Drug to treat bleeding may benefit some stroke patients

A drug, currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, may benefit patients with stroke caused by bleeding in the brain -- intracerebral haemorrhage, a clinical trial suggests.

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A drug, currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, may benefit patients with stroke caused by bleeding in the brain — intracerebral haemorrhage, a clinical trial suggests.

Intracerebral haemorrhage occurs when a diseased blood vessel within the brain bursts, allowing blood to leak inside the brain.

The study, published in the journal The Lancet, found that giving tranexamic acid (TXA) to people who had experienced intracerebral haemorrhage reduced the number of deaths in the early days following the stroke.

It also showed that both the amount of bleeding in the brain and the number of associated serious complications were lower in the patients who had received the TXA treatment, the researchers from the University of Nottingham said.

 

For the study, researchers recruited more than 2,000 patients who were diagnosed as having had bleeding in the brain -- confirmed by CT scan -- from 124 hospitals in 12 countries between 2013 and 2017.
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Patients who received TXA treatment experienced lower associated serious complications — such as pneumonia and brain swelling — as compared to those who had not, the researchers added.

 

However, the trial found no difference in the number of people who were left disabled or had died at three months after their stroke — the study’s primary outcome.

“While we failed to show significant benefits three months after stroke, the reduction in early deaths, amount of bleeding on the brain and serious complications are signs that this drug may be of benefit in the future,” said co-author Nikola Sprigg, Professor at the University of Nottingham.

For the study, researchers recruited more than 2,000 patients who were diagnosed as having had bleeding in the brain — confirmed by CT scan — from 124 hospitals in 12 countries between 2013 and 2017.

They were randomly sorted into two patient groups — one received TXA within eight hours of their stroke and another was given a saline placebo.

Also Read: Study Shows That 3 Cups of Coffee or Tea Daily May Cut Risk of Stroke

CT scans of the patients’ brains were performed 24 hours after their stroke and their progress was monitored and measured at day two and day seven after their stroke. The final follow up was performed at 90 days.

The researchers have highlighted the need for further studies to find out whether giving an earlier dose of TXA might be beneficial for patients. (IANS)

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Anaemia Drug Can Aid in Recovery After Heart Attack

However, further studies will be needed to confirm if the same benefits are seen in humans, they noted

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Heart Disease
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Drugs currently undergoing development to treat anaemia — lack of blood — could be repurposed to help prevent people with Type-2 diabetes from developing heart failure, according to a new research.

Researchers found that after a heart attack, a protein called HIF acts to help heart cells survive.

In people with diabetes, fats accumulate within the heart muscle and stop the HIF protein from becoming active. This means that a person is more likely to suffer lasting heart muscle damage, and develop heart failure after a heart attack.

“After a heart attack, people with Type-2 diabetes are more likely to develop heart failure more quickly, but we have not fully understood the reasons why that is the case,” said lead researcher Lisa Heather, research student at the University of Oxford in the UK.

“What we have shown with this research is that the metabolism of people with Type-2 diabetes means they have higher levels of fatty acids in the heart. This prevents signals going to the heart protective protein telling it to ‘kick-in’ after a heart attack,” she added.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

In the study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the team treated diabetic rats with a drug known to activate the HIF protein, and were able to encourage the heart to recover after a heart attack.

However, these initial results suggest that several drugs known to activate HIF and currently undergoing phase-III clinical trials to treat people with anaemia, could potentially be given to people with diabetes, immediately after a heart attack in the future, the researchers said.

Also Read- Samsung Introduces New Portable SSD X5 in India

“This research in rats has not only identified the mechanism that could explain why people with Type-2 diabetes have poorer outcomes after a heart attack, but also a practical way this might be prevented,” the researchers explained.

However, further studies will be needed to confirm if the same benefits are seen in humans, they noted. (IANS)