Monday May 21, 2018

Study Shows That Drug to treat bleeding may benefit some stroke patients

A drug, currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, may benefit patients with stroke caused by bleeding in the brain -- intracerebral haemorrhage, a clinical trial suggests.

0
//
19
Children and adults treated with oral antibiotics may have a higher risk of developing kidney stones, according to a new study.
Antibiotics, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

A drug, currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, may benefit patients with stroke caused by bleeding in the brain — intracerebral haemorrhage, a clinical trial suggests.

Intracerebral haemorrhage occurs when a diseased blood vessel within the brain bursts, allowing blood to leak inside the brain.

The study, published in the journal The Lancet, found that giving tranexamic acid (TXA) to people who had experienced intracerebral haemorrhage reduced the number of deaths in the early days following the stroke.

It also showed that both the amount of bleeding in the brain and the number of associated serious complications were lower in the patients who had received the TXA treatment, the researchers from the University of Nottingham said.

 

For the study, researchers recruited more than 2,000 patients who were diagnosed as having had bleeding in the brain -- confirmed by CT scan -- from 124 hospitals in 12 countries between 2013 and 2017.
representational image, Pixabay

Patients who received TXA treatment experienced lower associated serious complications — such as pneumonia and brain swelling — as compared to those who had not, the researchers added.

 

However, the trial found no difference in the number of people who were left disabled or had died at three months after their stroke — the study’s primary outcome.

“While we failed to show significant benefits three months after stroke, the reduction in early deaths, amount of bleeding on the brain and serious complications are signs that this drug may be of benefit in the future,” said co-author Nikola Sprigg, Professor at the University of Nottingham.

For the study, researchers recruited more than 2,000 patients who were diagnosed as having had bleeding in the brain — confirmed by CT scan — from 124 hospitals in 12 countries between 2013 and 2017.

They were randomly sorted into two patient groups — one received TXA within eight hours of their stroke and another was given a saline placebo.

Also Read: Study Shows That 3 Cups of Coffee or Tea Daily May Cut Risk of Stroke

CT scans of the patients’ brains were performed 24 hours after their stroke and their progress was monitored and measured at day two and day seven after their stroke. The final follow up was performed at 90 days.

The researchers have highlighted the need for further studies to find out whether giving an earlier dose of TXA might be beneficial for patients. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Smoking Before 15 May Develop Risk of Drug Problem in Boys

The data were then correlated with the age at which they started using cannabis, the researcher said.

0
//
8
If boys start smoking pot in early teenage life, they may be at a higher risk of developing drug problem as a young adult, a new study has said.
Representational Image. Pixabay

If boys start smoking pot in early teenage life, they may be at a higher risk of developing drug problem as a young adult, a new study has said.

The findings, published in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, suggested that boys who start smoking pot before the age of 15 are much more likely to have a drug problem at 28 than those who start at 15 or after.

According to the researchers, in these teens, the risk of having a drug abuse problem by age 28 is 68 per cent. But if they start smoking between 15 and 17 the risk drops to 44 per cent.

“The odds of developing any drug abuse symptoms by age 28 were non-significant if cannabis use had its onset at ages 15 to 17, but were significant and almost doubled each year if onset was before age 15,” the researchers, including Charlie Rioux from Universite de Montreal, said.

For the study, the researchers recruited 1,030 boys. Every year between ages 13 and 17, they were asked if they had consumed cannabis at all in the previous year.

At the age of 17, 20 and 28, the boys were again asked if they consumed cannabis as well as other drugs, including hallucinogens, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilisers, heroin and inhalants.

The data were then correlated with the age at which they started using cannabis, the researcher said.

If boys start smoking pot in early teenage life, they may be at a higher risk of developing drug problem as a young adult, a new study has said.
Early smoking can lead to drug problems in boys. Pixabay

The results confirmed that the younger boys started smoking marijuana, the more likely they had a drug problem later as young men.

Drug Controller of India: Drugs Controller of India to Introduce New Vaccine Specific Regulations

Even if those who start smoking cannabis at 17 years were at lower risk, frequent users — 20 or more times a year — at age 17 had almost double the chance of abuse by age 28 than occasional users.

“Since peer influence and delinquency were identified as early risk factors for earlier cannabis onset and adult drug abuse, targeting these risk factors in prevention programmes may be important, especially since prevention strategies working on the motivators of substance use have been shown to be effective,” Rioux noted. (IANS)

Next Story