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Sujoy Ghosh’s Ahalya: An attempt at deconstructing the power structure

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Picture credit: andhrapulse.com
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By Sreyashi Mazumdar

Reviving the vestiges of Hindu mythology, Sujoy Ghosh’s attempt at recreating the titillation and a subversive idea of patriarchy has kicked off a furor across the board.

Picture credit: indiatoday.in

Ranging from applauds to criticism, literary ostracization to video leaks, the 14 minutes saga, Ahalya, has left people stupefied at the maverick’s masterpiece. If mulled over considerably, Ghosh’s new take at the forlorn mythological character has rendered a new method of presenting myth with a post-modernistic approach.

The original story kicked off with Brahma’s daughter Ahalya marrying Gautama. Being irked at the duo’s union, Indra donned Gautama’s look and bewitched the charismatic and coveted Ahalya. Gautama on running into Ahalya and Indra’s conjugal moves punished both of them. Ahalya was turned into a stone whereas Indra was cursed with a thousand female genitals hanging from his body.

 

Ghosh’s masterwork despite being a revamped version brings forth a modernized take on the same. The story kicks off with inspector Indra knocking at the door. The tale in its very first scene unravels the mythological characters, with a tinge of stealth and spookiness encapsulating it. Ahalya, in the mythological version, was portrayed as coy and overmodest; however, Ghosh’s Ahalya was charismatic and bold feigning to be demure.

Contrary to the original version, it was the stealthy lass who entices Indra, while Gautam Sadhu (Gautama)- Ahalya’s grey-haired husband- witnesses the furtive advances of her unbridled spouse and Inspector Indra’s lechery gradually creeping in. However, cracking upon the stereotype Ghosh’s Ahalya gets salvaged despite her adultery and Indra gets fixated and reduced to a doll.

From Ramayan to Mahabharat, every Indian mythological cock-a-hoop had a tinge of patriarchy engraved in it. Be it Sita being asked not to transgress the Lakshman rekha or Draupadi being at receiving end, begging and wailing for help, while Pandavas stood helplessly at the behest of their adversaries’ advances.

Picture credit: missmalini.com
Picture credit: missmalini.com

Every Indian mythological tell-tale sets forth a tone of a strong patriarchal order where in the woman is nothing less than a medium to corroborate the strength and virility of the male characters. Lord Rama wouldn’t have been charismatic and enchanting enough had not Sita’s vehement cries for help, after being abducted by Ravana, juddered Rama and forced him to put his prowess at work.

Similarly, despite Ahalya being the prime character of the mythological tale, was reduced to a mere tool, a bait with Gautama’s and Indra’s prowess nibbling on it. Indra in a bid to get back at Gautama used Ahalya as a pawn. Despite, Ahalya’s unadulterated intentions and being beguiled in a trap, she was censured and chastised.

Ghosh’s version of Ahalya has touched upon issues like- deconstructed patriarchy, chauvinistic normativity, female virility and sexuality respectively. The furtive advances of Ahalya ravel out a new era wherein female adultery isn’t ostracized and castigated.

Further, his attempt at deconstructing the generalized power order, has set forth a stage to present mythological narratives with a post-modernistic flavour; for instance, may be a refurbished Ramayan might roll out a plot wherein Rama has to give an Agnipariksha for accusing Sita of adultery, or where Pandavas’ virility get tested to which Draupadi stands helplessly.

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  • theupscaleinc

    This is great

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Women Are Rarely “Put Front And Center” At The Heart Of Climate Action

Feminism doesn't mean excluding men

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Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017.
Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017. VOA

Women must be at the heart of climate action if the world is to limit the deadly impact of disasters such as floods, former Irish president and U.N. rights commissioner Mary Robinson said on Monday.

Robinson, also a former U.N. climate envoy, said women were most adversely affected by disasters and yet are rarely “put front and center” of efforts to protect the most vulnerable.

“Climate change is a man-made problem and must have a feminist solution,” she said at a meeting of climate experts at London’s Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Entrepreneurship.

“Feminism doesn’t mean excluding men, it’s about being more inclusive of women and – in this case – acknowledging the role they can play in tackling climate change.”

Research has shown that women’s vulnerabilities are exposed during the chaos of cyclones, earthquakes and floods, according to the British think-tank Overseas Development Institute.

In many developing countries, for example, women are involved in food production, but are not allowed to manage the cash earned by selling their crops, said Robinson.

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Earth depletion, Pixabay

The lack of access to financial resources can hamper their ability to cope with extreme weather, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of the event.

“Women all over the world are … on the front lines of the fall-out from climate change and therefore on the forefront of climate action,” said Natalie Samarasinghe, executive director of Britain’s United Nations Association.

“What we — the international community — need to do is talk to them, learn from them and support them in scaling up what they know works best in their communities,” she said at the meeting.

Also read: Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wines

Robinson served as Irish president from 1990-1997 before taking over as the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and now leads a foundation devoted to climate justice. (VOA)