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Supreme Court seeks Government’s response on a plea regarding the Tuberculosis Medicines

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Delhi, Jan 13, 2017: The Supreme Court on Friday sought the government’s response on a plea regarding the tuberculosis medicines. The government ha said that the existing stocks of tuberculosis medicine can be utilized for giving daily doses to patients.

Chief Justice Jagdish Singh Khehar and Justice D.Y. Chandrachd sought the government’s response as PIL petitioner Raman Kakkar said that the government could well use its existing stocks for giving daily doses of tuberculosis medicine to the patients.

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Kakkar, a Haryana-based medical officer associated with revised national TB control programme of India, is seeking the implementation of the government decision to administer TB doses to patients every day instead of the earlier practice of thrice a week.

He pointed out that TB medicines stocked with the government could be utilized for the present and arrangement for the future could be made in due course.

The court on Friday asked the Deputy Director General (TB) in the Health and Family Welfare Ministry to file an affidavit stating the government position on the plea.

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In December 2016, the central government told the top court that it had decided to phase out the intermittent doses regime and switch over to daily doses.

The court was told that the switch-over would commence in five states.

Kakkar moved the top court for shifting to daily doses regime after studying 5,300 cases where he found the reappearance of the disease in patients who were treated and cured by giving doses thrice a week.

He found that in many cases, the resurfacing of the disease proved to be fatal. (IANS)

 

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Can Vinegar be Used to Treat Tuberculosis?

There is a real need for less toxic and less expensive disinfectants that can eliminate TB and non-TB mycobacteria, especially in resource-poor countries

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Nutritional therapists have known about this product for years and will often recommend it to clients to help stimulate the digestion, alkalise the body and help with weight loss
Nutritional therapists have known about this product for years and will often recommend it to clients to help stimulate the digestion, alkalise the body and help with weight loss. Pixabay

An international team of researchers has found that an active ingredient in vinegar can effectively kill mycobacteria, even the highly drug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Acetic acid in vinegar might be used as an inexpensive and non-toxic disinfectant against drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria as well as other stubborn, disinfectant-resistant mycobacteria, they found.

“For now, this is simply an interesting observation. Vinegar has been used for thousands of years as a common disinfectant and we merely extended studies from the early 20th century on acetic acid,” explained Howard Takiff, head of the laboratory of molecular genetics at the Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Investigation (IVIC) in Caracas, Venezuela.

Mycobacteria are known to cause tuberculosis and leprosy, but non-TB mycobacteria are common in the environment, even in tap water, and are resistant to commonly used disinfectants.

vinegar
Representational image. Pixabay

While investigating the ability of non-TB mycobacteria to resist disinfectants and antibiotics, Takiff’s postdoctoral fellow Claudia Cortesia stumbled upon vinegar’s ability to kill mycobacteria.

Testing a drug that needed to be dissolved in acetic acid, Cortesia found that the control with acetic acid alone, killed the mycobacteria she wanted to study.

“After Claudia’s initial observation, we tested for the minimal concentrations and exposure times that would kill different mycobacteria,” noted Takiff.

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“There is a real need for less toxic and less expensive disinfectants that can eliminate TB and non-TB mycobacteria, especially in resource-poor countries,” Takiff observed.

Whether it could be useful in the clinic or labs for sterilising medical equipment or disinfecting cultures or clinical specimens remains to be determined, said the study published in mBio, the online journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (IANS)