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Supreme Court seeks Government’s response on a plea regarding the Tuberculosis Medicines

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Medicines (representational image), Wikimedia

Delhi, Jan 13, 2017: The Supreme Court on Friday sought the government’s response on a plea regarding the tuberculosis medicines. The government ha said that the existing stocks of tuberculosis medicine can be utilized for giving daily doses to patients.

Chief Justice Jagdish Singh Khehar and Justice D.Y. Chandrachd sought the government’s response as PIL petitioner Raman Kakkar said that the government could well use its existing stocks for giving daily doses of tuberculosis medicine to the patients.

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Kakkar, a Haryana-based medical officer associated with revised national TB control programme of India, is seeking the implementation of the government decision to administer TB doses to patients every day instead of the earlier practice of thrice a week.

He pointed out that TB medicines stocked with the government could be utilized for the present and arrangement for the future could be made in due course.

The court on Friday asked the Deputy Director General (TB) in the Health and Family Welfare Ministry to file an affidavit stating the government position on the plea.

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In December 2016, the central government told the top court that it had decided to phase out the intermittent doses regime and switch over to daily doses.

The court was told that the switch-over would commence in five states.

Kakkar moved the top court for shifting to daily doses regime after studying 5,300 cases where he found the reappearance of the disease in patients who were treated and cured by giving doses thrice a week.

He found that in many cases, the resurfacing of the disease proved to be fatal. (IANS)

 

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New Vaccine for Tuberculosis Shows Promise

Two peptides (small proteins), which are normally found in tuberculosis bacteria, were synthesised and then bound extremely tightly to an adjuvant (a stimulant) that was able to kick-start the immune response in the lungs

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World, Population, Tuberculosis
The study, published in European Respiratory Journal, shows that one in four people in the world carries tuberculosis bacterium in the body. Pixabay

Researchers have successfully developed and tested a new type of vaccine targeting tuberculosis (TB).

Published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the early-stage vaccine was shown to provide substantial protection against TB in a pre-clinical laboratory setting.

“Tuberculosis is a huge world-wide health problem. It’s caused by a bacteria that infects the lungs after it’s inhaled, is contagious and results in approximately 1.6 million deaths per year globally,” said study co-author Anneliese Ashhurst, who is affiliated with both the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney.

The research programme targeting the deadly disease took over five years of effort to be implemented.

FILE – A tuberculosis patient receives treatment at a clinic in Jakarta, Indonesia. VOA

A team of scientists created the advanced synthetic TB vaccine and have now demonstrated its effectiveness using mouse models.

Two peptides (small proteins), which are normally found in tuberculosis bacteria, were synthesised and then bound extremely tightly to an adjuvant (a stimulant) that was able to kick-start the immune response in the lungs.

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“We were then able to show that when this vaccine was inhaled into the lungs, it stimulated the type of T cells known to protect against TB. Importantly, we then demonstrated that this type of vaccine could successfully protect against experimental airborne TB infection,” Ashhurst said.

“The important thing is that the vaccine actually gets to the lungs because that’s where you first see TB. Ultimately, we would love to see a form of this vaccine available for use in an easily inhaled nasal spray which would provide life-long TB protections,” said researcher Warwick Britton. (IANS)