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Surge in diabetes can hamper India’s economic growth

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Mumbai: With diabetes affecting a large section of India’s population, the chronic health condition can adversely affect the country’s economic growth, experts have warned.

“The financial burden of diabetes on India over the next 10 years can increase drastically and threaten the productivity level of the workforce in the country and loss of national income,” said Dr. Avinash Phadke of SRL Diagnostics in Mumbai.

“Diabetes must be made a national health priority, else it will impact India’s growth as an emerging economy,” Phadke said.

A recent study from the University of East Anglia showed that it reduces people’s employment chances and wages around the world.

The study published earlier this year in the journal PharmacoEconomics looked into the economic impact of Type-II diabetes worldwide.

They were surprised to find not only a large cost burden in high-income countries but also in low and middle-income countries – where people with this disease and their families face high costs for treatment.

“Diabetes affects 382 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 million by 2035. It is a chronic disease that has spread widely in recent decades – not only in high-income countries, but also in many populous low and middle-income countries such as India and China,” said lead researcher Till Seuring.

Phadke said that diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India with more than 62 million individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.

“It may affect 79.4 million individuals by 2030,” Phadke pointed out.

(IANS)

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People Who Take Cholesterol-Lowering Statins are at Higher Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

More than a quarter of middle-aged adults use a cholesterol-lowering drug, according to estimates

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Research, Cholesterol, Diabetes
Statins are a class of drugs that can lower cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. Pixabay

People who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at twice the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a new study.

Statins are a class of drugs that can lower cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. More than a quarter of middle-aged adults use a cholesterol-lowering drug, according to estimates.

The study, published in the Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews journal, found that statin users had more than double the risk of diagnosis compared to those who didn’t take the drugs. Those who took the cholesterol-lowering drugs for more than two years had more than three times the risk of diabetes.

“The fact that increased duration of statin use was associated with an increased risk of diabetes – something we call a dose-dependent relationship – makes us think that this is likely a causal relationship,” said the study’s lead author Victoria Zigmont, a graduate student at the Ohio State University.

Research, Cholesterol, Diabetes
People who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at twice the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Pixabay

“Statins are very effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. I would never recommend that people stop taking the statin they’ve been prescribed based on this study, but it should open up further discussions about diabetes prevention,” Zigmont added.

For the study, the researchers included over 4,000 men and women who did not have diabetes, were candidates for statins based on heart disease risk and had not yet taken the drugs at the start of the study. About 16 per cent of the group – 755 patients – were eventually prescribed statins during the study period.

Researchers also found that statin users were 6.5 percent more likely to have a troublingly high HbA1c value – a routine blood test for diabetes that estimates average blood sugar over several months.

Also Read- Research: Policies Need to be Context-Specific to Improve Women’s Lives in Rural India

“Although statins have clear benefits in appropriate patients, scientists and clinicians should further explore the impact of statins on human metabolism, in particular the interaction between lipid and carbohydrate metabolism,” said co-author Steven Clinton, a Professor at the varsity. (IANS)