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Swarna Bharat Party is only party that supports and defends all freedom: Interview with Party President Vishal Singh

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By Tarun Pratap

Swarna Bharat Party claims to be India’s only liberal party. It came into existence almost three years ago. Party believes that India, even though, achieved freedom in 1947  but it never became free.

NewsGram talked to the SBP President Vishal Singh about the politics in India and SBP’s status and future plans.

NewsGram: Please tell about the ideology behind the formation and functioning of the party.

Vishal Singh: Swarna Bharat is India’s first liberal party.

SBP is designed from scratch as a liberal party which advocates the philosophy of liberty and truth. It is not dependent on any individual, and aims to provide the sole national platform for all Indian liberals for all times to come.

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Vishal Singh

India’s governance is in shambles. India’s governance failure is systemic, and comprehensive. But our major parties refuse to implement any reforms, pandering, instead, to caste and religion – and to the lowest common denominator. Claiming socialist goals, they subsidize the rich and are hands-in-glove with corrupt business. Crony capitalism is rife. The voice of the people is blocked through numerous anti-free speech laws. There is no one in the elected assemblies of India to speak for our freedoms.

In this domain of total under-performance, China is rushing ahead in many fields and poses an increasing strategic threat to India. India needs to get its act together to become a major power. That can only happen if India is committed to human liberty and truth. India needs to launch a frontal attack against illiberal and poverty-creating ideas.

That’s why Swarna Bharat Party – to speak – and fight – for our freedoms and our future. SBP fills a deeply-felt void in India’s political landscape, which is populated by corrupt, socialist parties. None of these parties can possibly provide India with corruption-free governance to deliver freedom, equality of opportunity, the rule of law, and justice to every citizen.

SBP is the only party in India that supports and defends ALL your freedoms. So, people should join us to defend their liberty.

NG: What do you think about the current political scenario of India and where does SBP stand?

VS: The current scenario in India is a mess. People had lots of faith in Modi to bring change, but that has disappeared. Many people still have faith in AAP which will also fail. People have to understand that all Indian political parties try to fix India with socialism. This simply will not work. Indians need to wake up and take steps before it is too late. Already our best talent wants to leave the country. Everyone wants reservation. The situation is alarming. SBP is working hard to convince people about the perils of socialism. We have a full blueprint on how to transform India. We are ready to do the job. We are just waiting for India to be ready.

NG: I saw the recent launch of the official website of the party, what are the plans of the party to increase its reach and connect with people?

VS: We are continuously on looking out for leaders who really believe in liberty. Leaders are the ones who will convince people why all current political parties are doomed to fail and why freedom and liberty are the only way to make India strong. We do have outreach programs. We are converting our manifesto into regional languages which will help masses to learn more about us.

NG: How strong is the base of the party outside India and within India?

VS: We are a very small group as of now but we are all deeply committed in reforming India. There is huge interest in us in last one year. People now are taking us more seriously. The experiments of Modi and AAP are failing. People cannot still forget corrupt congress. There is growing interest in our value proposition of liberty. I see us only growing from here.

NG: Sir, your party talks about being only liberal party in India, please put some light on that?

VS: This is a very good question. In India as well as the word liberal would mean a person very closely associated with left. We are the true classical liberals. A classical liberal is a person who believes in a limited state. A state which has a very limited role, unlike left liberals who want the state to become a nanny state. I would strongly encourage people to visit our website swarnabharat.in/sbp-manifesto to read the detailed manifesto.

NG: What in your opinion, Indian politics lacks? I mean there is right, left and centre and still a void? When AAP came, there were lot of talk of alternate politics but with time it could not prove it, do you think SBP can do that?

VS: As I told all Indian political parties are same. They offer the same brand of socialism. Left, right and centre have no meaning in India. They are all socialist. All of them want more state control. Modi came with the slogan of limited government, but all his actions are diametrically opposite to what he was saying during elections.

AAP is a one man party and will suffer the same fate as BJP. SBP is rooted to idea of liberty. We are ready today but we will wait for India to be ready. As I said I would encourage people to read our manifesto.We have the time-bound plan to transform India into a sone ki chidiya gain.

NG: What are the immediate and future plans for the party?

VS: The immediate and future plans for party remain same – to convince India of the value of liberty. On this front we are reaching out in various ways – direct contact,social media, press releases.

I would like to call upon people and especially young people to read our manifesto, mull over it and join us. The revolution in India has to begin first in the minds of people. When minds change action happens automatically.  We hope that in coming days India will see the value of liberty – the core proposition of SBP.

  • Nalini Mishra

    Great insights by Vishal Singh. Amazing perspective. I wish SBP all the very best.

Next Story

India Needs to Improve its Educational Outcomes to Catch up with China

To catch up with China, India needs to lay emphasis on improving its educational outcomes

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The Article 30 of the Constitution gives religious and linguistic minorities “the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.”
India needs to improve its educational outcomes to catch up with China. Pixabay

By Amit Kapoor

Both China and India started building their national education systems under comparable conditions in the late 1940s. Different policies and historical circumstances have, however, led them to different educational outcomes, with China outperforming India not just in terms of its percentage of literate population and enrollment rates at all levels of education, but also in terms of number of world-class institutions in higher education, and greater research output.

The roots of China’s successful education system date back to the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), which unintentionally expanded access to the primary education through democratising the schooling system, which was previously elitist in character, thus addressing the problem of mass illiteracy.

In contrast, India continued to focus on its higher education system since independence and only realised the importance of basic education in 1986, keeping it behind China and many other countries in Asia in educational development. In terms of enrollment, China reached a 100 percent gross enrollment rate (GER) in its primary education in 1985, whereas, India attained that level only in 2000.

In terms of secondary school enrollment, India and China both started at the similar rates in 1985, with about 40 percent of their population enrolled in secondary schools. However, due to a wider base of primary school students, the rate of increase in China has been much faster than in India, with 99 percent secondary enrollment rate in China and 79 percent in India in 2017.

India is closing in on the Chinese rate in terms of access to education, but on the literacy level front, there is a huge gap in the percentage of literate populations in the two countries. In the age group of 15-24 years, India scores 104th rank on literacy and numeracy indicator, compared to China’s 40th rank.

The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which assesses after every three years the domain knowledge of 15-year-old students in reading, mathematics, science and finance, revealed that students in China performed above the OECD average in 2015. Moreover, one in four students in China are top performers in mathematics, having an ability to formulate complex situations mathematically. Further, China outperforms all the other participating countries in financial literacy, by having a high ability to analyse complex finance products. For India, the comparable data is not available as it was not a participating country in PISA 2015.

abroad, study
Representational image.

However, in India, the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2017 provides data for rural youth, aged 14-18, with respect to their abilities to lead productive lives as adults. According to this survey, only about half of the 14-year-old children in the sample could read English sentences, and more than half of the students surveyed could not do basic arithmetic operations, like division. For basic financial calculations, such as managing a budget or making a purchase decision, less than two-thirds could do the correct calculations.

With regard to the higher education system, both India and China dominate the number of tertiary degree holders because of their large population size, but when it comes to the percentage of the population holding tertiary degrees, only about 10 per cent and 8 per cent of the population possess university degrees in China and India, respectively. By contrast, in Japan, almost 50 per cent of the population holds a tertiary degree, and in the United States, 31 per cent of the population hold a tertiary degree.

In terms of the international recognition of universities, the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Ranking for 2019 places seven of the China’s universities in the top 200, compared to none for India. The global university rankings, which are based on various performance metrices, pertaining to teaching, research, citations, international outlook and industrial income, shows progress for several of China’s low-ranked universities, largely driven by improvements in its citations.

In fact, the Tsinghua University has overtaken the National University of Singapore (NUS) to become the best university in Asia due to improvements in its citations, institutional income and increased share of international staff, students and co-authored publications.

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While India has progressed in terms of massification of education, there is still a lot which needs to be done when it comes to catching up with the China’s educational outcomes. China’s early start in strengthening its primary and secondary education systems has given it an edge over India in terms of higher education. Moreover, Chinese government strategies are designed in line with the criterion used in major world university rankings, especially emphasis is on the two factors which weigh heavily in the rankings — publications and international students.

The relentless publications drive, which is very evident in China, is weak in India and has led to a growing gap in the number of publications contributed by the two countries. Further, China enrolled about 292,611 foreign students in 2011 from 194 countries, while India currently only has 46,144 foreign students enrolled in its higher education institutions, coming from 166 countries. The large number of international enrollments in China is a reflection of its state policies granting high scholarships to foreign students.

To catch up with China, India needs to lay emphasis on improving its educational outcomes. Massification drive for education has helped India raise its student enrollments, but a lot needs to be done when it comes to global recognition for its universities. Further, it needs to focus on building the foundation skills which are acquired by students at the school age, poor fundamental skills flow through the student life, affecting adversely the quality of education system. (IANS)