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Swarna Bharat Party is only party that supports and defends all freedom: Interview with Party President Vishal Singh


By Tarun Pratap

Swarna Bharat Party claims to be India’s only liberal party. It came into existence almost three years ago. Party believes that India, even though, achieved freedom in 1947  but it never became free.

NewsGram talked to the SBP President Vishal Singh about the politics in India and SBP’s status and future plans.

NewsGram: Please tell about the ideology behind the formation and functioning of the party.

Vishal Singh: Swarna Bharat is India’s first liberal party.

SBP is designed from scratch as a liberal party which advocates the philosophy of liberty and truth. It is not dependent on any individual, and aims to provide the sole national platform for all Indian liberals for all times to come.

Vishal Singh

India’s governance is in shambles. India’s governance failure is systemic, and comprehensive. But our major parties refuse to implement any reforms, pandering, instead, to caste and religion – and to the lowest common denominator. Claiming socialist goals, they subsidize the rich and are hands-in-glove with corrupt business. Crony capitalism is rife. The voice of the people is blocked through numerous anti-free speech laws. There is no one in the elected assemblies of India to speak for our freedoms.

In this domain of total under-performance, China is rushing ahead in many fields and poses an increasing strategic threat to India. India needs to get its act together to become a major power. That can only happen if India is committed to human liberty and truth. India needs to launch a frontal attack against illiberal and poverty-creating ideas.

That’s why Swarna Bharat Party – to speak – and fight – for our freedoms and our future. SBP fills a deeply-felt void in India’s political landscape, which is populated by corrupt, socialist parties. None of these parties can possibly provide India with corruption-free governance to deliver freedom, equality of opportunity, the rule of law, and justice to every citizen.

SBP is the only party in India that supports and defends ALL your freedoms. So, people should join us to defend their liberty.

NG: What do you think about the current political scenario of India and where does SBP stand?

VS: The current scenario in India is a mess. People had lots of faith in Modi to bring change, but that has disappeared. Many people still have faith in AAP which will also fail. People have to understand that all Indian political parties try to fix India with socialism. This simply will not work. Indians need to wake up and take steps before it is too late. Already our best talent wants to leave the country. Everyone wants reservation. The situation is alarming. SBP is working hard to convince people about the perils of socialism. We have a full blueprint on how to transform India. We are ready to do the job. We are just waiting for India to be ready.

NG: I saw the recent launch of the official website of the party, what are the plans of the party to increase its reach and connect with people?

VS: We are continuously on looking out for leaders who really believe in liberty. Leaders are the ones who will convince people why all current political parties are doomed to fail and why freedom and liberty are the only way to make India strong. We do have outreach programs. We are converting our manifesto into regional languages which will help masses to learn more about us.

NG: How strong is the base of the party outside India and within India?

VS: We are a very small group as of now but we are all deeply committed in reforming India. There is huge interest in us in last one year. People now are taking us more seriously. The experiments of Modi and AAP are failing. People cannot still forget corrupt congress. There is growing interest in our value proposition of liberty. I see us only growing from here.

NG: Sir, your party talks about being only liberal party in India, please put some light on that?

VS: This is a very good question. In India as well as the word liberal would mean a person very closely associated with left. We are the true classical liberals. A classical liberal is a person who believes in a limited state. A state which has a very limited role, unlike left liberals who want the state to become a nanny state. I would strongly encourage people to visit our website to read the detailed manifesto.

NG: What in your opinion, Indian politics lacks? I mean there is right, left and centre and still a void? When AAP came, there were lot of talk of alternate politics but with time it could not prove it, do you think SBP can do that?

VS: As I told all Indian political parties are same. They offer the same brand of socialism. Left, right and centre have no meaning in India. They are all socialist. All of them want more state control. Modi came with the slogan of limited government, but all his actions are diametrically opposite to what he was saying during elections.

AAP is a one man party and will suffer the same fate as BJP. SBP is rooted to idea of liberty. We are ready today but we will wait for India to be ready. As I said I would encourage people to read our manifesto.We have the time-bound plan to transform India into a sone ki chidiya gain.

NG: What are the immediate and future plans for the party?

VS: The immediate and future plans for party remain same – to convince India of the value of liberty. On this front we are reaching out in various ways – direct contact,social media, press releases.

I would like to call upon people and especially young people to read our manifesto, mull over it and join us. The revolution in India has to begin first in the minds of people. When minds change action happens automatically.  We hope that in coming days India will see the value of liberty – the core proposition of SBP.

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Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Nalini Mishra

    Great insights by Vishal Singh. Amazing perspective. I wish SBP all the very best.

Next Story

Pentavalent vaccine: Doctors raise red flag

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive

the new Hepatitis B vaccine for adults is called Heplisav-B.
India's PV to be reexamined because of its harmful effects. .
  • Pentavalent vaccine was introduced in India six years ago
  • It is since then have been a cause of many deaths
  • Doctors want it to be reexamined before continuing its use

Pentavalent vaccine (PV), that was introduced by India a little over six years ago, doubled the deaths of children soon after vaccination compared to the DPT (Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus) vaccine, according to a new study that calls for a “rigorous review of the deaths following vaccination with PV”.

Health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine. Wikimedia Commons
PV has been cause of many deaths in past years. Wikimedia Commons

Government records show that there were 10,612 deaths following vaccination (both PV and DPT) in the last 10 years. There was a huge increase in these numbers in 2017, which the Health Ministry has promised to study. “The present analysis could be a starting point in the quest to reduce the numbers of such deaths,” authors of the new study say.

The study by Dr Jacob Puliyel, Head of Pediatrics at St Stephens Hospital, and Dr V. Sreenivas, Professor of Biostatistics at the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), both in New Delhi, is published in the peer-reviewed Medical Journal of Dr D.Y. Patil University.

PV is a combination of the DPT vaccine and two more vaccines against Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) and hepatitis B. Starting December 2011, PV was introduced into India’s immunisation programme to replace DPT vaccine in a staged manner with a view to adding protection against Hib and Hepatitis B without increasing the number of injections given to infants.

Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons
Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons

But sporadic reports of unexplained deaths following immunisation with PV had been a matter of concern. Puliyel, Sreenivas and their colleagues undertook the study to find out if these deaths were merely coincidental or vaccine-induced.

The authors obtained data of all deaths reported from April 2012 to May 2016 under the Right to Information Act. Data on deaths within 72 hours of administering DPT and PV from different states were used.

For their study, the authors assumed that all deaths within 72 hours of receiving DPT are natural deaths. Using this figure as the baseline, they presumed that any increase in the number of deaths above this baseline among children receiving PV must be caused by this vaccine.

Also Read: With Medicine Running Out, Venezuelans With Transplant Live in Fear

According to their analysis of the data provided by the government, there were 237 deaths within 72 hours of administering the Pentavalent vaccine — twice the death rate among infants who received DPT vaccine.

Extrapolating the data, the authors have estimated that vaccination of 26 million children each year in India would result in 122 additional deaths within 72 hours, due to the switch from DPT to PV.

“There is likely to be 7,020 to 8,190 deaths from PV each year if data from states with the better reporting, namely Manipur and Chandigarh, are projected nationwide,” their report says.

It is important to make sure that these vaccines are reexamined peroperly. VOA

The authors note that while the study looks at the short-term increase in deaths (within three days of vaccination) it does not calculate the potential benefits of PV on infant mortality, for example by protection against lethal diseases like Haemophilus influenza.

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive. “These findings of differential death rates between DPT and PV do call for further rigorous prospective population-based investigations,” the study concludes. IANS