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Swarna Bharat Party is only party that supports and defends all freedom: Interview with Party President Vishal Singh

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By Tarun Pratap

Swarna Bharat Party claims to be India’s only liberal party. It came into existence almost three years ago. Party believes that India, even though, achieved freedom in 1947  but it never became free.

NewsGram talked to the SBP President Vishal Singh about the politics in India and SBP’s status and future plans.

NewsGram: Please tell about the ideology behind the formation and functioning of the party.

Vishal Singh: Swarna Bharat is India’s first liberal party.

SBP is designed from scratch as a liberal party which advocates the philosophy of liberty and truth. It is not dependent on any individual, and aims to provide the sole national platform for all Indian liberals for all times to come.

vishal
Vishal Singh

India’s governance is in shambles. India’s governance failure is systemic, and comprehensive. But our major parties refuse to implement any reforms, pandering, instead, to caste and religion – and to the lowest common denominator. Claiming socialist goals, they subsidize the rich and are hands-in-glove with corrupt business. Crony capitalism is rife. The voice of the people is blocked through numerous anti-free speech laws. There is no one in the elected assemblies of India to speak for our freedoms.

In this domain of total under-performance, China is rushing ahead in many fields and poses an increasing strategic threat to India. India needs to get its act together to become a major power. That can only happen if India is committed to human liberty and truth. India needs to launch a frontal attack against illiberal and poverty-creating ideas.

That’s why Swarna Bharat Party – to speak – and fight – for our freedoms and our future. SBP fills a deeply-felt void in India’s political landscape, which is populated by corrupt, socialist parties. None of these parties can possibly provide India with corruption-free governance to deliver freedom, equality of opportunity, the rule of law, and justice to every citizen.

SBP is the only party in India that supports and defends ALL your freedoms. So, people should join us to defend their liberty.

NG: What do you think about the current political scenario of India and where does SBP stand?

VS: The current scenario in India is a mess. People had lots of faith in Modi to bring change, but that has disappeared. Many people still have faith in AAP which will also fail. People have to understand that all Indian political parties try to fix India with socialism. This simply will not work. Indians need to wake up and take steps before it is too late. Already our best talent wants to leave the country. Everyone wants reservation. The situation is alarming. SBP is working hard to convince people about the perils of socialism. We have a full blueprint on how to transform India. We are ready to do the job. We are just waiting for India to be ready.

NG: I saw the recent launch of the official website of the party, what are the plans of the party to increase its reach and connect with people?

VS: We are continuously on looking out for leaders who really believe in liberty. Leaders are the ones who will convince people why all current political parties are doomed to fail and why freedom and liberty are the only way to make India strong. We do have outreach programs. We are converting our manifesto into regional languages which will help masses to learn more about us.

NG: How strong is the base of the party outside India and within India?

VS: We are a very small group as of now but we are all deeply committed in reforming India. There is huge interest in us in last one year. People now are taking us more seriously. The experiments of Modi and AAP are failing. People cannot still forget corrupt congress. There is growing interest in our value proposition of liberty. I see us only growing from here.

NG: Sir, your party talks about being only liberal party in India, please put some light on that?

VS: This is a very good question. In India as well as the word liberal would mean a person very closely associated with left. We are the true classical liberals. A classical liberal is a person who believes in a limited state. A state which has a very limited role, unlike left liberals who want the state to become a nanny state. I would strongly encourage people to visit our website swarnabharat.in/sbp-manifesto to read the detailed manifesto.

NG: What in your opinion, Indian politics lacks? I mean there is right, left and centre and still a void? When AAP came, there were lot of talk of alternate politics but with time it could not prove it, do you think SBP can do that?

VS: As I told all Indian political parties are same. They offer the same brand of socialism. Left, right and centre have no meaning in India. They are all socialist. All of them want more state control. Modi came with the slogan of limited government, but all his actions are diametrically opposite to what he was saying during elections.

AAP is a one man party and will suffer the same fate as BJP. SBP is rooted to idea of liberty. We are ready today but we will wait for India to be ready. As I said I would encourage people to read our manifesto.We have the time-bound plan to transform India into a sone ki chidiya gain.

NG: What are the immediate and future plans for the party?

VS: The immediate and future plans for party remain same – to convince India of the value of liberty. On this front we are reaching out in various ways – direct contact,social media, press releases.

I would like to call upon people and especially young people to read our manifesto, mull over it and join us. The revolution in India has to begin first in the minds of people. When minds change action happens automatically.  We hope that in coming days India will see the value of liberty – the core proposition of SBP.

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Swarna Bharat Party condemns government’s healthcare policy in Karnataka

The privatisation of health policies was opposed by SBP

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Health policies of Karnataka being opposed by SBP
SBP asks government to work on government hospitals rather then privatising them. Facebook
18th November 2017:
Mr Asif Iqbal, Karnataka State coordinator of Swarna Bharat Party (SBP), today strongly opposed the communist, anti-market and anti-people policy of the Congress Karnataka government to cap healthcare charges in the private sector.
Mr Iqbal said that the Siddaramaiah government should start learning basic economics. Good intentions do not necessarily lead to good outcomes. This communist policy will shut down many hospitals and drive away thousands of health professionals. In this way, it will hurt everyone, including the poor. No communist society has ever done well, and this communist policy will badly harm Karnataka.
In a free market people voluntarily give their custom to the service provider who gives them the best service at the lowest cost. Simultaneously, the desire for profits motivates healthcare providers to provide good quality healthcare while keeping their costs down. And they can’t charge whatever they wish since they are forced by the competition among hospitals to keep prices low. Anyone who makes a profit in such a competitive environment is signalling that he has successfully and efficiently served the people. That is the best outcome for society.
Mr Iqbal said that a government’s role is to create the environment for market-led profitable investments, thereby serving the needs of the community. But instead of identifying and addressing any barriers to investment, the Congress communists are attacking the very existence of the health sector.
Mr Siddaramaiah should remember that the taxpayer does not subsidise private medical establishments, nor should there be any such subsidy. These establishments buy land at commercial rates, pay commercial taxes and get utilities like water and electricity at commercial rates. In fact, SBP understands that most private hospitals and clinics do not break even for the first 5-10 years and most earn barely enough to stay in business.
Mr Iqbal said that instead of Mr Siddaramaiah worrying about the private sector (which is already badly shackled with thousands of rules and infrastructure constraints), he should look within – at the total mismanagement of government hospitals. The private sector is the last ray of hope for the people of Karnataka. Now the anti-people Congress wants to extinguish even this last ray of hope.
SBP also opposes many other aspects of the new health laws, such as a district redressal body that comprises six members but with only one doctor member. Further, there are already several avenues for patients to complain, including consumer courts, civil courts, medical bodies. Creating another body is unnecessary and will only increase fear in doctors’ mind. SBP demands a complete repeal of the new law.

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Dalai Lama says that India and China have great potential

The spiritual leader feels that both the countries are doing compassionate works

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Dalai Lama talks about India and China
Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai says that India and China can work together. VOA

New Delhi, Nov 19

Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have “great potential” and they could work together at a “practical level”.

“I think, a great potential… India and China combined are doing more compassionate work… At a practical level also. Imagine two billion people working together,” he told reporters here after inaugurating Smile Foundation’s initiative, The World of Children.

The spiritual leader, who has lived in India in self-imposed exile since 1959, said neither country had the “ability to destroy the other”.

“Whether you like it or not, you have to live side by side,” he said.

Underlining the ancient spiritual connection between the two countries, he said Chinese Buddhist Hsuan Tsang visited Nalanda (now in Bihar) and brought Nalanda Buddhist traditions to China.

“All thinkers of Nalanda are Indian. So Nalanda’s tradition is India’s tradition,” he said.

The Nalanda traditions had turned Tibetans, who were warriors, into more compassionate, peaceful and non-violent nation, he said.

“So sometimes in Delhi, teasing my Indian friend, (I say) if Tibet still remained in the previous way of life, like Mongols, Chinese invasion may not have taken place,” the Dalai Lama said in a lighter vein.

He said nobody in the world wanted violence but it was happening “because our minds are dominated by destructive emotions due to short-sightedness”.

“Nobody wants problems. Yet, many problems are our own creation.”

The Dalai Lama said the existing modern education was oriented to material values. India can take lead in improving the education system by combining modern education with ancient knowledge, he said. (IANS)

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Cleaning of Ganga is not impossible, but it is very difficult.

The holy river is also one of the most polluted river

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Ganga in Haridwar
A pile of garbage lies on the riverbank along the Ganges riverfront known as "Har ki Pauri," the most sacred spot in the Hindu holy town of Haridwar where devotees throng. VOA

– Saket Suman

About five years ago, when Financial Times journalist and author Victor Mallet began living in Delhi, he was shocked to discover that the Yamuna — “this beautiful river of Indian legend and art” — was chocked with untreated sewage and industrial waste after it had passed through the city on its way to Mathura, Agra and on to join the Ganga at Allahabad He wondered “how a river so sacred to so many Indians could also be so polluted and neglected” and then set out to record the plight of the Ganga.

His exhaustive journey led him to various key locations on the river, including its source at Gaumukh and Sagar Island and the Sunderbans at its mouth in the Bay of Bengal. This culminated in the publication of “River of Life, River of Death” (Oxford University Press/Rs 550/316 pages).

“My conclusion is that it is not impossible (to clean the Ganga) — but it is very difficult. Narendra Modi is the latest of several Indian prime ministers to announce plans to rescue the Ganga — in fact, I would say he has been the most fervent — but like his predecessors, he has struggled to implement these plans despite the availability of funds from India itself and from international donors such as the World Bank and Japan.

“Clearly, the Ganga has enormous problems of physical pollution from sewage, industrial toxins and pesticide run-off. Too much of the water is diverted for irrigation in the dry season, which can leave parts of the river without water before the monsoon. But with political will and public support — I don’t think anyone in India objects to saving the river — it can be done,” Mallet told IANS in an email interview from Hong Kong.

The important thing, he maintained, is to change mindsets and he noted in this context that it is quite common among devout Hindus to say: “Ma Ganga is so spiritually pure that nothing we throw in the river will sully her or make a difference.”

The author said that sensible holy men and environmentalists who care for the Ganga term this as nonsense — and the reason it’s not true is that the Ganga’s very spiritual power arises from its physical properties as a life-giver, as a provider of water and fertility.

“That’s why rivers have always been worshipped in ancient times, including in England. So if you destroy the river’s life-giving qualities through pollution, you destroy the source of her spiritual importance,” he added.

In the book, he also states that it is not impossible to clean the Ganges, “as river clean-ups in Europe and America have shown”.

Elaborating on this, he said: “When I was a child living in London, my mother always told me not to fall in the Thames because the river was so filthy that if I fell in I would have to go to hospital and have my stomach pumped! Yet today the Thames is clean — muddy, but virtually free of industrial pollution and untreated sewage — because successive governments and water and sanitation companies have stopped the pollution.

“The same is true of the Rhine in continental Europe and the Chicago river in the United States. The great thing about rivers is that you don’t have to scrub them clean — you just have to stop polluting them and the natural flow of the river does the rest.”

Mallet maintained that the record on the Ganga has so far been disappointing in terms of implementation, but hoped that there will be a change now that there is a new minister in charge.

“If you clean the Ganga by improving sanitation, you not only save the goddess, you also create thousands of jobs in infrastructure development, and save the lives of thousands of children who die each year because of bad water, poor hygiene and stomach bugs. Likewise, if India curbs its greenhouse gases — and this seems to be happening anyway because alternative energy such as solar power is now very competitive on price — then that will also help it to reduce the kind of air pollution that has recently been afflicting Delhi and the whole of North India,” he maintained.

Mallet went on to add that he learnt a lot about the mythology and the history of the river — and the history of India — in the course of his research for the book.

“In a way, India is so rich in civilisations and stories that you can never say you have completed your work as a researcher and writer. You can at least make a start, and also explain the contemporary political, social, religious and environmental issues that affect the river and the country as a whole,” Mallet said. (IANS)