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Syrian Doctors appeal to President Barack Obama to End Bombings, Sieges in Aleppo

While commending Russia's willingness to consider a three-hour pause in military action in Aleppo, the U.S. supports the U.N.'s call for a long-term cease-fire

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FILE - A medic inspects the damage inside Anadan Hospital, sponsored by Union of Medical Care and Relief Organizations, after it was hit by an airstrike in the rebel-held city of Anadan, northern Aleppo province, Syria, July 31, 2016.

August 11, 2016: Aleppo, the second-largest city in Syria, where the civil war broke out in the county five years ago and remains caught in the battle for control between rebels and pro-government forces. As the fighting has included numerous attacks on medical facilities, a group of Syrian doctors sent a letter to U.S. President Barack Obama describing the devastation and pleading for action to stop attacks against civilians. The doctors are quite afraid that the attack on medical facilities will wipe out medical services in Aleppo in a month if they continue at the same rate.

“What pains us most, as doctors, is choosing who will live and who will die. Young children are sometimes brought into our emergency rooms so badly injured that we have to prioritise those with better chances, or simply don’t have the equipment to help them.”

In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Elizabeth Trudeau said attacks against civilians must stop.

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“The United States has repeatedly condemned the indiscriminate bombing of medical facilities by the Assad regime in Aleppo and elsewhere in Syria. The attacks, I think, as illustrated in this letter are appalling. They must cease,” Trudeau said Thursday during the daily briefing.

Sieges in Aleppo left many people in need of food and medical aid. The United Nations has tried coordinated deliveries but has been hindered by ongoing violence.

FILE – In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian citizens and firefighters gather where a rocket hit the Dubeet hospital in the central neighbourhood of Muhafaza in Aleppo, Syria, May 3, 2016.

The U.S. is working with the U.N. and others, including Russia, to “find a diplomatic approach to reducing the violence in a sustainable way, and allow unimpeded lifesaving humanitarian access into places like Aleppo,” according to Trudeau.

While commending Russia’s willingness to consider a three-hour pause in military action in Aleppo, the U.S. supports the U.N.’s call for a long-term cease-fire.

“Any pause is good, anything that cuts the violence,” said Trudeau, adding “the U.N. has come out and they’ve said that the three hours are not enough” and Washington supports the U.N. on this.

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Attempts at U.N.-led peace talks, which included efforts by the United States and Russia to coordinate Syria’s warring sides, have also been unsuccessful.

“For five years, we have face death from above on a daily basis. But now we face death from all around,” the doctors wrote. “For five years, the world has stood by and remarked how ‘complicated’ Syria is while doing little to protect us.”

The doctors said they do not need tears, sympathy or prayers, but to be free from bombings and international action to prevent any future sieges. (VOA)

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Americans Tend to Rely on Social Media for News which is often Unreliable: Report

Those who rely on social media and peers for news, on the other hand, don't see those platforms as reliable yet still choose to get their news from these sources

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The findings of a research suggest that perceived reliability is not the only factor that drives what Americans choose as their go-to News sources on Social Media. Pixabay

Owing to lack of time and competing demands, one-third of Americans rely on news platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly social media and peers, says a new report.

The other two-thirds of the public consider their primary news sources trustworthy, mainly print news and broadcast television, according to the report from California-based non-profit RAND Corporation.

“A lack of time and competing demands may explain why a third of Americans turn to news sources they deem less reliable, which suggests improving the quality of news content or teaching people how to ‘better consume’ news isn’t enough to address ‘Truth Decay,'” said Jennifer Kavanagh, senior political scientist and co-author of the report.

“Media companies and other news providers may need to provide more easily accessible and digestible ways for individuals to consume high quality investigative journalism”.

“Truth Decay” is a phenomenon defined as diminishing reliance on facts, data and analysis in public life.

The report draws from a national survey of 2,543 Americans to examine how reliability, demographics and political partisanship factor into news choices and how often people seek out differing viewpoints in the news.

About 44 per cent of respondents reported that news is as reliable now as in the past, while 41 per cent said it has become less reliable and 15 per cent – mostly women, racial and ethnic minorities and those without college degrees – said it is more reliable.

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Owing to lack of time and competing demands, one-third of Americans rely on News platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly Social Media and peers, says a new report. Pixabay

Respondents who lean on print and broadcast platforms were more likely to deem them reliable.

Those who rely on social media and peers for news, on the other hand, don’t see those platforms as reliable yet still choose to get their news from these sources.

“The findings suggest that perceived reliability is not the only factor that drives what Americans choose as their go-to news sources,” said Michael Pollard, a sociologist and lead author of the report.
“Despite acknowledging that there are more reliable sources for news, people with demands on their time may be limited to using less reliable platforms.”

Asked whether they ever seek out alternate viewpoints when catching up on the news, 54 per cent said they “sometimes” do, 20 percent said, “always or almost always,” 17 per cent said “infrequently,” and 9 percent said, “never or almost never.”

The report also identified the four most common combinations of news media types consumed by Americans: print publications and broadcast television, online, radio, and social media and peers.

Those who are college-educated were less likely to get their news from social media and peers, instead opting for radio and online sources.

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Media companies and other News providers may need to provide more easily accessible and digestible ways for individuals to consume high quality investigative journalism, especially on Social Media. Pixabay

Those with less than a college education were more likely to report “never or almost never” seeking out news with alternate viewpoints.

“Those who are married were three times more likely than singles to rate their peers as the most reliable source for news,” said the report.

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Unmarried people were more likely than married people to report they “always or almost always” seek out sources with differing views. (IANS)